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Thread: Making Beef Broth - Bacteria Issue? page

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    dprest's Avatar
    dprest is offline Junior Member
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    Making Beef Broth - Bacteria Issue?

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    I made beef broth this weekend. I first roasted the bones (had meat on them) for 45 minuets at 325 deg and then simmered them (adding water in pot).

    Between the roasting process in the oven and the simmering/boiling process - the bones (with substantial meat attached) sat out at room temp for approx 45 minutes. I had meant to only leave them out for 15 (I stepped out and could not get back until later than expected) - yes stupid. Do you foresee any issues with bacteria, etc from this process. I would appreciate the insight from the MDA forum. Thanks

  2. #2
    sbhikes's Avatar
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    No. The bacteria were killed from the cooking.
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    Uncephalized's Avatar
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    LOL no. You killed all the bacteria once by roasting, then a few colonized while it was out, then you killed them again by boiling.

    I regularly eat meat that's been sitting out for a day or more after cooking, at room temperature, with no ill effects. IMO people are way over-paranoid about meat contamination.
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  4. #4
    Tneah's Avatar
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    No, not at all. U are boiling again.

    I have made broth and put in our second fridge to jell up and separate later into smaller blocks. Sometimes I forget about it and return to it a week later. The fat layer that skims the surface seems to seal out everything and it smells and taste fresh stil. I toss the fat and keep the broth and freeze.

  5. #5
    dbalch's Avatar
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    I understand your concern. New bacteria could have formed and grew after you killed any by the boiling. If the broth has sat at room tempature for too long, just reboil it to kill any of the new bacteria.

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