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  1. #1
    jenn26point2's Avatar
    jenn26point2 is offline Senior Member
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    Grass-fed hot dogs

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    I found a grass-fed meat farm in Iowa that delivers very close to my home that I'm interested in buying from. Looking at their product line, they offer beef hot dogs. Since Primal suggests using all parts of the animal to include organs and tongue, is it safe to say that grass-fed hot dogs would fit the ideal? I'm looking for something for my kids for when they turn up their noses at my dinner endeavors. Right now, all I have for them is burgers I've grilled up and stored to replace hot dogs and chicken nuggets.

    What about brats, too? Thanks!!

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    NWPrimate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenn26point2 View Post
    I'm looking for something for my kids for when they turn up their noses at my dinner endeavors. Right now, all I have for them is burgers I've grilled up and stored to replace hot dogs and chicken nuggets.

    What about brats, too? Thanks!!
    I don't think it would be ideal, but better than regular hot dogs by far.
    That said, I'm a big fan of the "They Will Eat it Eventually" school of thought.

    Just start making true primal dinners with pieces of meat and veggies. You can make these hot dogs and other foods for a special treat if you like, but stick to less processed foods as your staples.

    The kids might protest a little, but they will get hungry. I never force my son to eat anything right away, but if he doesn't eat it, it will be wrapped up and served the next time he wants something to eat. Kids will eat it well before you have to worry about them starving. This is not punishment, and you should never seem angry about it.

    Just excuse them from the table if they don't want to eat, then serve it up again when they start whining about being hungry or it's time for the next meal.

    I'm not saying you should serve up brains and fish roe in the beginning either. There's no reason to gross them out.
    Just stick with delicious steaks, poultry, pork, eggs, fish etc...at first so you're not causing undo stress.

    You can then start sneaking some tiny chopped bits of liver into their ground beef, soup...whatever.
    Then when you want to get adventurous you can start adding in new things as side dishes so that if they don't like it, the entire meal is not ruined.

    I've had fun with this and now it's gotten to the point where my 6 year old will say things to his mother like...
    "Mom, it's important to try new things!"

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    jenn26point2's Avatar
    jenn26point2 is offline Senior Member
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    Right now, my 5 year old will not eat steak, chicken breast, chicken drummies, pork chops, or any other whole meat. If it's not ground or pureed then squeezed into a casing or formed into a nugget, he won't eat it. And he's old enough that he just goes to the fridge to get whatever he wants. He's very stubborn and I'm at my wits end trying to control him - hence the burgers that he eats willingly (they're a mixture of deer burger and ground pork).

    He and my husband really drive me nuts sometimes with their food issues.

    My daughter does pretty good. If it's meat, she'll eat it. She's not too picky. Son never used to be though, so I'm just waiting for the day when daughter starts turning her nose up at foods too.

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    NWPrimate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenn26point2 View Post
    And he's old enough that he just goes to the fridge to get whatever he wants.
    To start with...no he's not.

    I am in no way telling you how to raise your son, but you can put a stop to that right away.
    If he wants something to eat, he can ask you.

    I say this in the most humble way possible, but you are not doing him any favors giving him this kind of control.

    Once he can no longer just grab whatever he wants out of the fridge, he will have no choice but to eat what you feed him.
    You are his parent, and it is your responsibility to decide what goes into his mouth and when.

    If you can muster the determination to follow the "eat it eventually" plan I mentioned before, you will win, and he will come to enjoy healthy foods. You'll have a hard couple of days, or maybe even weeks, but you will lay down a healthy way of eating that should last a lifetime.

    The sooner you do this the better, as once he is a pre-teen he will have outside food options that are out of your control, so you need to have good foundations in place before that happens.

    Again, no disrespect intended. I'm just walking a fine line between the taboo of giving parental advice and being very passionate when it comes to children and nutrition.
    Last edited by NWPrimate; 03-11-2012 at 11:41 AM.

  5. #5
    Mud Flinger's Avatar
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    I buy the unprocessed grass fed hot dogs from US Wellness meats. The kids love them. We don't have them often, but it's always an option when they don't want what I've made. I also don't buy what I don't want them to eat, so going to the fridge often either ends up in chosing another acceptable option and then they feel that they have some control. While I agree that you are the parent and need to have some control, over doing it can lead to rebellion that brings a whole other set of issues (been there - no fun). Just keep trying and keep the drama to a minimum. The occasional hot dog is not the same as the occasional donut if you get my drift. Choose yout battles wisely.

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    jenn26point2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NWPrimate View Post
    To start with...no he's not.

    I am in no way telling you how to raise your son, but you can put a stop to that right away.
    If he wants something to eat, he can ask you.

    I say this in the most humble way possible, but you are not doing him any favors giving him this kind of control.

    Again, no disrespect intended.
    What I mean by this is that he's physically capable of going to the fridge and grabbing something, and he often does, and we go round and round about it. I fight him daily about grabbing whatever he wants and tell him he has to ask me first. Unfortunately, that's not getting us anywhere.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mud Flinger View Post
    I buy the unprocessed grass fed hot dogs from US Wellness meats. The kids love them. We don't have them often, but it's always an option when they don't want what I've made. I also don't buy what I don't want them to eat, so going to the fridge often either ends up in chosing another acceptable option and then they feel that they have some control. While I agree that you are the parent and need to have some control, over doing it can lead to rebellion that brings a whole other set of issues (been there - no fun). Just keep trying and keep the drama to a minimum. The occasional hot dog is not the same as the occasional donut if you get my drift. Choose yout battles wisely.
    Sadly, he's already starting to exhibit some behaviors that I'm afraid will take him down the road to poor health and weight. I have caught him sneaking a food we've already told him no about. For instance, candy. I have it high up on the shelf in the pantry for an occasional treat (it's stuff they got on Valentine's day from their school mates) and I've caught him climbing the shelves to get it, or already eating it. Last night, he was told no by his dad when he tried to eat something (I think it was fruit snacks - they're organic), and despite his dad saying no, he opened the bag and stuffed a few in his mouth before we could stop him. The kid would eat non-stop if we would let him. It scares me to say the least.

  7. #7
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    How old is he? He may just be testing you, or if you think he's getting addicted to sugar, you can try increasing his fat intake. I buy my kids uncured, natural hot dogs. No hormones or antibiotics, no gluten, no corn, no filler. Beef and spices! When it comes to "hot dogs are unhealthy," the key issues are usually nitrites and other preservatives and fillers like corn syrup/HFCS. We do uncured sausages, too. I also make "chicken nuggets" that are cubed chicken breast dredged in coconut milk, coated with a rice-flour based seasoning, and baked. Any time a recipe calls for milk, I substitute coconut milk! Not the "beverage" stuff in the cartons - canned coconut milk, with no other ingredients. Sometimes you need to add water to get the consistency, though, and there can be some flavor issues in some recipes, so you need to experiment. Good luck!

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