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Thread: Any mushroom hunters out there? page 2

  1. #11
    NWPrimate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Urban Forager View Post
    Like you we walk in the woods just about every day and being able to gather food at the same time has added an extra dimension to our walks. I think you will really enjoy it.
    I'm sure I'd enjoy it. I've had a strong "hunter-gatherer" instinct as long as I can remember. Nothing is more satisfying that bringing home some fish that I had a blast catching. I can't tell you how many hours I spent as a kid catching frogs, snakes, crawfish...just about anything. As an adult, I realized that my fishing obsession was just a way to continue my love of "messing with animals".

    I took my son berry picking at the end of last summer, and it was a wonderful experience.

    Even before going paleo/primal I realized that any time I engaged in these activities, or even gathering wood on a camping trip, I get a deep sense of what can be described as "this is what we're supposed to be doing".

    That said, I still have a healthy fear of eating a poisonous mushroom. I know anecdotes like the biology professor story stick in our head even though we never hear about the thousands of great meals people have without incident, but it's still quite unsettling to think of poisoning yourself or family.

  2. #12
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    I think every one has heard horrible stories of mushroom poisonings. It's too bad because there are very few mushrooms that are dangerous. The thing to do is learn form some one who is very experienced and not get reckless and try and eat anything unless you are 100% sure you know what it is. It is a good idea to start with a mushroom that is easy to identify like chanterelles.

    Foraging is so satisfying, like you said, for berries or wood, it just feels right. I love it when I find a forgotten fruit tree in abandoned lot, it's like a gift.

  3. #13
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    I Googled Florida mushrooms and apparently hallucinogenic mushrooms are really popular here. Who knew. Apparently they grow wild in cow pastures and people can get arrested for having them but only if they know what they are. If you don't know what they are I guess it's okay to eat them and then "hear colors". Pass.

    So when do the yummy ones start growing in Washington?
    "If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat?" - Tom Snyder, talk show host

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    The key to getting started is to search for mushrooms that have no poisonous look-alikes or whose look-alikes are easy to identify by sight. I wouldn't try eating anything I had to ID with a microscopic exam of the spores. For fun I ID mushrooms I am pretty sure I don't want to eat just for the practice. I use David Arora's Mushrooms Demystified and take lots of pictures from all angles. I send the pics with my ID and explain why I came to my conclusion to my friend who is happy to confirm my ID. So far I have been right every time.
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    That Arora book is top notch. Comprehensive, with much more humor than you'd expect.

    Found on my hike yesterday:


    The chanterelles are ginormous out here, although they have a nasty habit of surrounding themselves with poison oak

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    Oh wow, I'm so jealous. We found chanterelles a couple months ago but haven't seen many mushrooms since. Maybe they've come back from the recent rains. Gotta get out there again. And yeah, Arora's book is really funny, like the pictures of what happens when you get too greedy and how people usually get sick from wild mushrooms.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  7. #17
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    Same here I need to go out and see if there are any chanterells. I haven't seen any for a couple of months.

    We've been gathering a lot of black trumpets. I'll see if I can post some pictures later today. I haven't posted any pictures yet so cross your fingers and I'll see if I can make that happen.

  8. #18
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    We gathered these black trumpets on a walk a couple of weeks ago. We weren't expecting to find anything so we were unprepared, I had to run back to the car to get a knife and basket.
    IMG_2656.jpg
    We ate as many as we could fresh and dried the rest. This what they look like dried.
    IMG_2657.jpg

  9. #19
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    From what I've seen, chanterelles grow slowly and are extremely persistent. Of all the popular edibles they seem by far the most bug- and weather-proof. I'm almost certain the ones I found had been there for weeks, if not months...one was approaching dinner-plate size. Around here I just look for coast live oak/poison oak/madrone thickets, with emphasis on deep duff and water-retaining declivities if it's been on the dry side. With their neon-orange coloring, at least they don't actively hide from you like some others (black morels in spring undergrowth back East, e.g.).

  10. #20
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    I just checked my chanterelle spot and I didn't see any, but I did see some small black trumpets. The trumpets are related to chanterelles and are also bug and weather proof. Where we are they grow near tan oak and huckleberry. The trumpets are easy to miss because they blend in with the duff.

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