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Thread: Chronic Lower Back Pain Solutions??? page 3

  1. #21
    yodiewan's Avatar
    yodiewan is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jammies View Post
    Interesting that you say this, because I just got a rumble roller last week. While it does feel great on the tight muscles in my mid and lower back, it has really aggravated my lower back. I have a flare of pain in my iliosacral joint that is really bothering me now too. I am planning to return it. Did you have any issues with that?
    I have a straight foam roller. But I never roll my lumbar area. I do my thoracic spine and glutes, but I don't roll across the lumbar region. I've heard that the lumbar spine is built for stability, not flexibility, so it makes sense to me not to roll over it.

  2. #22
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    vikismith is offline Junior Member
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    Some time due to extra exercise there be a back pain. We should maintain a balance between our exercise. We can also use any back pain remover machine that is very helpful because they helps in muscles exercise.

  3. #23
    Neckhammer's Avatar
    Neckhammer is offline Senior Member
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    Find a good Chiropractor. They can help with alignment and mobility, then set you up with a proper strengthening program.

    My long story short. Herniated disc at L5/S1 about 15 years ago. Tried PT and other things and eventually the ortho wanted to schedule a laminectomy surgery. Went to a Chiropractor instead. Couple of months of treatment and no more pain radiating to the leg, or in the back. Even able to compete as collegiate wrestler. 15-20 years later now I still go in for a tune up once in a while to help keep healthy. Still doing some heavy lifting and strengthening too. One relapse a couple years ago, but only took 2 weeks of intensive chiro treatment to get under control this time....I figure its due to my continued work on mobility and periodic visits as prevention.

  4. #24
    KimT's Avatar
    KimT is offline Senior Member
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    I've been down this road, almost 14 years ago. L5-S1 herniation followed by multiple rounds of PT, 3 epidurals, numerous chiropractic visits, nerve damage in leg, a few episodes of passing out due to the pain, finally led to a microdiscectomy after six years of battling it (docs thought I was too young to operate on). Would I do it again? Knowing what I know now? Maybe, maybe not. I think I'm one of the more fortunate ones in that I haven't needed another surgery. The stats say that only 50% are successful. It took me 4 months to return to work after surgery. I started to change my life a year after with diet and exercise and I hardly ever have back pain now, but still have a spot that is extremely painful and can't be touched where the scar is.

    All that background to say I get it, I've been there. The most important question is, what caused it? No doc gave me that answer. I'm currently doing studies in Neurosomatic therapy and have taken multiple courses in resistance stretching. More than likely it's caused by a postural imbalance and is you bodies way of dealing with the problem and trying to protect itself. Could be, like I found in my case, stronger dominant side muscularly in the hip, tighter fascially in the opposite side, which caused the disc to protrude. After surgery and PT, nobody ever told me really how to fix the issue and prevent it from happening again. They said, "never bend over at the waist again to pick anything up." That was it. I'm still learning and working through some issues that probably caused the problem to bein with. Getting to the root of the cause is hard because not many people do that kind of work.

    My husband treated a lady with 4 bulging discs and got her out of pain and kept her from surgery, all from stretching and doing fascial work. A lot of it was in her arm. Anatomy trains is a great resource to trace fascial lines.

    Anyway, if you have any questions, let me know. Best of luck!

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