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  1. #1
    aria1's Avatar
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    Help me please desperate with acne!

    Hi, I'm Aria. I started Paleo on 1st February 2012. I went straight hardcore.
    The foods I eat only consist of : Grass-fed beef,Onions,Garlic,Broccoli,Asparagus,Parsley,Coco nut milk(I make it myself,not canned), Organic Coconut oil, Coconut flour organic.

    Drinks: Only Rooibus Red tea and water.

    I also take Vitamin D 10,000iu. It's cold in Canada!

    The reason I don't eat eggs is because I don't have much money so I can't buy organic/pastured ones. I also have a mild allergy to eggs.What money I have I choose to spend it on grass-fed beef. That's the only meat I can find which is grass-fed. Poultry I can't afford most times to buy pastured. I'm looking to add wild salmon in my food but so far have only come across farmed so did not buy it. Fruits I cut because of their sugars.

    I've had acne since I was 10. Years on antibiotics didn't do anything. Now I'm 23 and before going Paleo I got around 2 big pimples every week but since starting!..I've not had a clear face. I get 2 to 3 huge pimples and before they can heal another bunch I can see already making it's way to show up! My face is a mess! I've stopped with foundation/makeup since going paleo also so I don't know what to do! I also get 8-9hours of sleep every night.

    Please please someone help me!! Is it an initial breakout? Some say there's no such thing. Is it isn't than what is it?? Because its making my life very hard!

  2. #2
    AMonkey's Avatar
    AMonkey is offline Senior Member
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    Its really hard to pin point what could cause spots in some people, its entirely possible you are cursed with bad genetics. But from what I've read, things that can help:

    -cut out dairy
    -cut out wheat
    -don't touch your face (this one definitely applies to me)
    -cut out facial products or very carefully select the ones you use (I don't wash my face with anything else than cold water, many facial products irritate my skin and cause spots, I use jojoba oil to moisturise)
    -change your pillow cover regularly

    I don't know if the 10,000 IU of vitamin D is necessary. And maybe the problem is something more abstract like "well your hormones and skin were all out of whack on a generic diet, now they need time to reset on paleo!" or something.

  3. #3
    Mama_Jane's Avatar
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    Here is a link from Cave Girl Eats

    http://cavegirleats.com/2011/04/27/wap-me-pretty/

    good luck -- in that vein you can make your own sauerkraut for pretty cheap--

    Basic Recipe for Sauerkraut

    1 litre glass jar with plastic lid or spring lid
    1 Cabbage Medium sized (1kg)
    1 tablespoon sea salt
    4 tablespoons of Kefir whey (you may use already fermented sauerkraut for an innoculant or simply add another tablespoon of salt.) or yogurt whey
    1 tablespoon of carraway seeds or fresh chopped dill.

    Germans have always sliced the cabbage with a specially made machine and pounded them with a wooden mortar in a large crock to bruise the cell walls.
    Grate cabbage with a hand grater or process in a food processor, then mix in a large food grade plastic bucket (get them at a hardware store) with the salt and Kefir whey. Pound with a meat mallot or wooden pounder of some kind. I’ve been known to use a pick handle, a clean one of course. Pound until the juices cause suction when you pull the pounder out of the mix.

    Press the mixture into a clean glass jar using a wooden spoon. Press firmly until the juice rises to the top and covers the mixture, which it will do when it is pounded enough. Leave at least one inch or more of space at the top of the jar to allow for expansion.
    Cover the kraut and store the jar in a cupboard for 3-5 days (depending on the ambient temperature) before transferring to the refrigerator. The sauerkraut may be consumed after a couple of weeks, though if you allow the fermentation process to continue for a month or so in the refrigerator you will be well rewarded with a most delicious flavour. I love sauerkraut at 4 months old.

    As with all fermenting, follow your nose. If it smells putrid or you have any doubts about the quality, then discard the sauerkraut and start again.
    from How to Make Sauerkraut

  4. #4
    Mama_Jane's Avatar
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    Here is a link from Cave Girl Eats

    http://cavegirleats.com/2011/04/27/wap-me-pretty/

    good luck -- in that vein you can make your own sauerkraut for pretty cheap--

    Basic Recipe for Sauerkraut

    1 litre glass jar with plastic lid or spring lid
    1 Cabbage Medium sized (1kg)
    1 tablespoon sea salt
    4 tablespoons of Kefir whey (you may use already fermented sauerkraut for an innoculant or simply add another tablespoon of salt.) or yogurt whey
    1 tablespoon of carraway seeds or fresh chopped dill.

    Germans have always sliced the cabbage with a specially made machine and pounded them with a wooden mortar in a large crock to bruise the cell walls.
    Grate cabbage with a hand grater or process in a food processor, then mix in a large food grade plastic bucket (get them at a hardware store) with the salt and Kefir whey. Pound with a meat mallot or wooden pounder of some kind. Iíve been known to use a pick handle, a clean one of course. Pound until the juices cause suction when you pull the pounder out of the mix.

    Press the mixture into a clean glass jar using a wooden spoon. Press firmly until the juice rises to the top and covers the mixture, which it will do when it is pounded enough. Leave at least one inch or more of space at the top of the jar to allow for expansion.
    Cover the kraut and store the jar in a cupboard for 3-5 days (depending on the ambient temperature) before transferring to the refrigerator. The sauerkraut may be consumed after a couple of weeks, though if you allow the fermentation process to continue for a month or so in the refrigerator you will be well rewarded with a most delicious flavour. I love sauerkraut at 4 months old.

    As with all fermenting, follow your nose. If it smells putrid or you have any doubts about the quality, then discard the sauerkraut and start again.
    from How to Make Sauerkraut

  5. #5
    MrsToon's Avatar
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    Check out www.crunchybetty.com for lots of ideas for a natural face routine. A member of my family has cystic acne, she refuses to go on antibiotics and is trying to clear it up naturally. She has started washing her face with raw, unfiltered honey every night, and is reporting excellent results! Redness is going away, swelling and angry cysts are deflating, and her skin just looks happier overall.

    My current skincare routine includes washing my face with honey and/or ground oatmeal/almonds. I then apply either lemon juice or organic Apple Cider Vinegar. I also use lavendar essential oil on my nose. I am working to decrease blackheads on my nose in particular.

    Hope this gives you some ideas. The honey wash is really amazing! Be sure your face is very dry when you apply the honey. Just a few splashes of water afterwards will rinse it away like magic.

  6. #6
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    My acne was caused by a lack of saturated fat and too low calories. Give it time, and also possibly try intermittent fasting to lower insulin. Insulin is a direct cause of acne; ie "skin diabetes".
    PDF Ebook The Fast-5 Diet and the Fast-5 Lifestyle | Free PDF Ebooks Files @AcrobatPlanet.Com

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    Could be wrong, but I thought I'd seen some pretty convincing info that acne was essentially an inflammatory issue driven by omega 3 : 6 imbalance and insulin disruption. Eating primal should resolve that, but it may not happen overnight, and likely won't.

    If you're keeping grain and sugar out of the picture (and I would urge you to minimize both even as part of an 80/20 splurge), and eating good omega 3 sources (fish, chia, grass-fed meats), this will resolve in time. Washes, scrubs, topical treatments are mere Band-Aids, IMO.

  8. #8
    thanatos's Avatar
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    I've had acne all my life and it cleared after going primal but it takes time. I suspect the omega3/6 balance thing is correct. If I slip up and have wheat too I get some back.

  9. #9
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    Easy ways for me to induce acne:

    Wash my face.
    Eat soybean oil, high fructose corn syrup, etc.
    Use hot water in the shower on my face, dryness, then acne as it oils up to correct the dryness.

    Easy ways to knock a zit back down in a day if I do get one:

    Dandelion tea - pull a whole dandelion, wash it, finely chop it up (root and leaves) and steep in just-cooler-than-boiling water for about ten minutes.
    Green tea.
    Young, bitter, or granny smith apples.
    Wild greens like stinging nettle.


    Turquoisepassion:
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    the buttstuff...never interested.
    He gives me Lamprey Kisses in the midnight sea
    Flubby tubby gums latching onto me
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
    Could be wrong, but I thought I'd seen some pretty convincing info that acne was essentially an inflammatory issue driven by omega 3 : 6 imbalance and insulin disruption. Eating primal should resolve that, but it may not happen overnight, and likely won't.

    If you're keeping grain and sugar out of the picture (and I would urge you to minimize both even as part of an 80/20 splurge), and eating good omega 3 sources (fish, chia, grass-fed meats), this will resolve in time. Washes, scrubs, topical treatments are mere Band-Aids, IMO.
    Yes. That's the epigenetic case for acne. The continual insulin spikes and systemic inflammation due to food sensitivities can cause androgen spikes (which directly leads to an increase in sebum output rate) and increased inflammatory response to inflamed lesions.

    However, hyperkeratinization and retention hyperkeratosis are two things you have to worry about. This can't necessarily be controlled by diet, though some argue otherwise (by saying lectin content can affect ZAG enzymes that help skin cell turnover). I believe this is a fairly genetically based ill that, for many, can't be corrected with diet alone.

    I used to keep a regimen log on Acne.org. You can look me up for more posts I make: Vanbelle. I also have a blog which I review the relevant research on acne but I WON'T be linking to that because it's a hot mess right now. But anyway, my acne is what brought me to a primal lifestyle. I'm on this forum now to lose weight. Here's a post I wrote back in the day about various causes of acne vulgaris:

    The causes of acne are vast. Sticky skin cells, premature apoptosis, excess proliferation and improper maturation of sebocytes/corneocytes, impaired ability to exfoliate, deficiency in exoliating skin enzymes (to break up desmosome adhesion), improper and low-quality (even thick) sebum composition, overproduction of sebum, bacterial imbalances and bacterial overgrowth, hyperkeratinization/retention hyperkeratosis, progesterone/estrogen imbalances, testosterone dominance, overactive immune response, sensitivity and gut irritation to specific foods, allergies and topical sensitivity, to name a few.
    I also wrote about diet on the skincare forum.

    Going to a nutritionist for your acne?

    The truth: of all the knowledge a nutritionist can give you, that and even more is available for free. You do not have to pay a nutritionist $150.00 an hour for basic fundamentals. I also believe it is better to research for yourself. It is much safer to get primary over secondary sources of information.

    Here's some suggestions where to begin:
    1 Cut out major allergens. This includes dairy, gluten, wheat, soy, and maybe eggs.
    2 Cut out processed food. No more cakes, cookies, pies, pastries. No fast food. No more grains either, like breads, oatmeal, rice, corn. Replace processed, syrup drinks with water and tea.
    3 Cut out as much sugar as possible. Eliminate fruits high in fructose. Only eat the fruits with the best fiber-to-sugar ratio, like cherries and berries. No juice.
    4 Eat high-quality (and humanely slaughtered) animals. Make sure the chicken is organic and hormone free, the beef is grass fed, and the fish is wild. If you're going to eat pork, make sure it's uncured and nitrite-free. Avoid tuna from a can and cold cuts (deli slices).

    The above steps will help insulin resistance or hypoglycemia; you'll have eliminated wheat and sugar and surely are eating foods low in carbs, which can help alleviate gastrointestinal issues and regulate bacterial overgrowth like Candida; and finally, you'll have added in animal foods that help re-balance your omega 3 fats, which will prevent inflammation.

    5 Make nutritionally dense vegetables apart of your diet. Broccoli, kale, chard, are spinach (leafy greens) are all good.
    6 Get a food sensitivity/intolerance test. This way, you can see if you are allergic to things like dairy and eggs. If not, feel free to drink raw milk and farm-fresh eggs. An elimination diet could work too (though not as accurate).
    7 If you like, add in supplements. Specific vitamins, probiotics, and fish oil capsules (or evening primose oil if you react adversely to fish oil); herbs like saw palmetto and agnus castus; natural DHT-blockers, and so on. Ginger and turmeric for inflammation too.

    Any persisting inflammation should be completely eliminated, once you have given up food intolerances. Supplements can repair vitamin and mineral deficiencies, restoring balance to the body.

    People I like on nutrition:
    Mark Sisson
    Sean Croxton
    Robb Wolf
    Loren Cordain
    Kurt Harris
    Chris Kresser
    William Davis
    Petro Dobromylskyj (Hyperlipid)
    Stephan Guyenet
    Martin Berkhan
    Brad Pilon
    Zoe Harcombe
    Martin Berkhan
    Also, beware of "natural regimens" as one poster mentioned. While natural regimens might work for some, I don't believe they're as helpful. I'll explain. One of the main reasons natural regimens (i.e. less-irritating) work is due purely to skin sensitivity. Synthetic detergents can alter the skin's pH, causing major bacterial population overgrowth of p.acnes, the major bacteria you need to be worrying about. Not to mention you dry the skin and disrupt its natural protective acid mantle that forms when left alone. If you're genetically apt to maintain your skin's health without products, or with less-harsh natural DIY regimens, go ahead. Here's another post:

    A "Natural Approach"

    For a time I tried DIY skincare. This was completely new to me, yet made a lot of sense. I liked the idea of creating the most customized and chemical-free products for myself. I used products such as:

    apple cider vinegar
    green tea
    tea tree oil
    grapeseed oil, castor oil, jojoba oil, olive oil
    manuka honey 12+ & 16+
    Egyptian Magic Cream
    Aztec Indian Secret Healing Clay
    witch hazel
    aloe vera
    rose water
    essential oils

    Before I say anything else, I'd also like to share my experience with the oil cleansing method. Be careful: oils are not created equal--and I'm not just speaking of comedogenicity.

    The method the oil was extracted and processed is extremely important as well:

    "Regular, mass-produced vegetable oils have turned rancid from the time they were produced, because they are extracted using high heat. Having gone bad, the oils are then deodorised and various chemicals are also added to remove the bad smell, give the oil a nice colour."

    Polyunsaturated oils are prone to spoiling:

    "polyunsaturated fats - unlike saturated fats - are highly unstable and they spoil easily when exposed to heat, light and air. By the time they reach you, most would have already turned rancid. And rancid oils are highly toxic."

    For these reasons, make sure your oils are cold pressed, stored in dark bottles, kept away from heat, and preferably unrefined and organic as well. If you order your oil online, I'm not sure the regulations on preserving the oil quality. Exposure to heat could be a reality (and even the oils shipped to stores from the manufacturer are at risk). Bottom line: oils vary greatly in quality! Beware.

    My skin did experience clearing during a portion of trying these products. However, I didn't stick with it for long. Here's the problem I fear I had: quality assurance, and shelf life. I fear I left my oils out and they got rancid, and then green tea eventually grew stale. I think part of trusting a company now to make my skincare for me, is that they are discerning oil quality and homogenizing and preserving the mixtures with safe ingredients. This way, I don't have to worry about anything going rancid or stale. They are just safer to use.

    Overall, I believe in natural derivatives like oils, extracts, hydrosols, distillates and so on. I also believe, in the same way not every dermatologist's prescription will work for you, neither will every natural derivative.
    Also, good on you for getting rid of your makeup. Acne cosmetica can be a huge problem. You can, however, wear mineral makeup.

    Overall, I'd recommend stick with primal. As for a regimen:

    Most skincare kits employ very basic ingredients: salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, glycolic acid and so on. Often times the kit will have a salicylic wash and benzoyl peroxide moisturizer. ProActiv has a sulfur mask, and I've heard this indeed does work. But, overall, most skincare kits do not have lasting results. Kits, like AcneFree and Noxema, usually damage the skin and makes breakouts worse.

    This is my point: do not rely on kits. It's important to customize a regimen for you.

    Note that, a normal regimen would have the following setup:

    1 cleanser, rinse
    2 mask, wash off
    3 tone
    4 exfoliate with any liquid toners
    5 serums
    6 sprays, mists
    7 moisturizers
    8 healing powders (daytime) or spot treatments (nighttime)

    (Steps 3-6 tend to be considered the "water-based" part of your routine. Step 7 is the lipophilic, or "oil-based"part of your routine. Oils, moisturizers and so on are step 7. It's a good idea to order your products based on this characteristic.)

    You do not need every step here. Anything beyond 3-4 steps means your regimen doesn't have great products to begin with.
    Any exfoliants (mandelic, azelaic, lactic, beta or other alpha hydroxy acids) should be limited and antibacterials, like benzoyl peroxide, need to be introduced on a periodized basis to adjust. Topical efficacy adjusts when the skin densensitizes as well (not to BP), so it's important to continually ramp up exfoliants on a bimonthly basis, eventually until you're only adjusting your routine every two months.

    This is probably WAY more than you wanted, but if there's anything I know about, it's acne. Happy to share my knowledge.
    Last edited by kcarol; 03-01-2012 at 07:02 PM.

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