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Thread: Good result with "grocery store" foods? page 2

  1. #11
    touchdowntodd's Avatar
    touchdowntodd is offline Senior Member
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    my results are 90-95% grocery store foods due to financial struggles to be able to afford grass fed and organic.. including stuff like butcher made salami, bacon with nitrates, etc...

    long story short it can easily be done, i have felt all of the benifits, i just have more risk long term from issues regarding the meats i eat ... that being said there are some taht argue the advantage of grass fed entirely, and its tough to find a source you can 100% trust that isnt just grass finished or anything like that
    started at 310 July 23rd 2011 ... workin and workin!

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  2. #12
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    1. Yes you can do this with conventional food.
    2. You need to exapnd your shopping horizons beyond Whole Foods, though. I have a side of local, pastured beef that cost me about $7 / lb in total. That includes the heart, tongue, it also includes filet mignon. I have 1/2 a forest-fed heritage breed pig that cost me about $4 / lb in total. She is delicious! Look for co-ops, direct sales from farms, etc. - basically just look around and see if you can get any of your food closer to the source.
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

  3. #13
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    I'd like to be able to buy the good grass-fed stuff, but I usually have to settle for grocery store meat. The only thing I won't compromise on is grocery store fish. All the good stuff they sell is farm grown and boasts that it has 'color added.' No thank you. Plus, their fish counter always smells fishy, and I've been told if you smell that, not to buy it. Fish is just something that seems like something you shouldn't settle for anything less than the freshest.

  4. #14
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    tcb
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    I have more problems finding local organic produce than meats, so yeah, I've had success eating grocery store foods. Between my local farmer and deer season, I haven't bought commercially raised meat since September '11 or so, but i'd say 75% of the veggies I eat are not organic.

  5. #15
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    I'm still looking for a good supply of grass fed beef, but in the meantime I watch sales and they are decent at times. So I take advantage of them. Otherwise, I get the store quality and that is one of the finer groceries in town. I don't eat WalMart meat if you know what I mean. I do try to get as much local produce as possible and organic whenever possible too. I figure this is a life long thing so I just do the best I can with what I have.

  6. #16
    Trifith's Avatar
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    I've been doing primal on grocery store food all along. It's working well, but I'm considering moving more organic/grassfed/etc. as the budget permits. Check the Before and After pics thread and you can see the progress I'm making.
    Warning: I'm an anarcho-capitalist political activist. It gets into everything.

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  7. #17
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    I guess I'm fortunate to live where I live because I've got a Whole Foods, Trader Joes, and the only new hybrid Publix within a mile of my house, and within 5 miles I've got a gourmet grocery called Fresh Market, two all organic groceries, a gourmet butcher that carries Kobe beef and Kurobuta pork, and a number of farmers markets that sell local produce and local seafood all year round.

    Yeah, it's expensive but when I really honestly crunch the numbers I clearly spent as much or more on fast food, chips, pizza, doctor visits, prescriptions, etc. before I started this. But I still have my limits. $20 plus for piece of Kobe beef or $20 for a little jar of honey is just crazy to me and I won't pay it unless I just have a need to feel like Thurston Howell III for a little while. Instead I find that I bounce around to all these stores throughout the week. I'll pick up some scallops and greens at the farmers market on Saturday morning, a half gallon of raw goat's milk at Food and Thought when they get it fresh on Tuesday, some Kurobuto pork chops at Jimmy P's when I'm in the area, and I always shop the sales at Whole Foods.

    Still, I'm really intrigued by the idea of growing my own. Already I've got a lot of free and effortless produce just from my trees ... avocados, papaya, mangos, starfruit, bananas, macadamias, guavas, cherries, and so on. I'd love to add some veggies but I don't really want to plant a garden. Seems like I could incorporate some things right in to the landscape without my house looking like a farm but I'm not really sure where to start. I know they grow a lot of tomatoes and blueberries in south Florida and that generally, winter is the growing season. But it seems to me that with all the shade from my trees I could probably grow stuff all summer too. Since the soil is so sandy I guess I'd need to create some raised beds and I'm not sure what to do about the bugs and rodents that would likely be competing for my food. Anybody have any tips for a wanna-be south Florida gardener?
    "If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat?" - Tom Snyder, talk show host

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by denasqu View Post
    Anybody have any tips for a wanna-be south Florida gardener?
    My attempts at gardening have failed miserably... I wish you luck. I'm going to give it another go on a limited basis this year.

  9. #19
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    I'm in South Carolina, not South Florida, but try things from the cabbage family (such as chard or kale) as winter landscape plants. Decorative cabbages have become popular around here and those used for eating wouldn't be that different. The thing that does best for me in our hot summers is japanese eggplant, which is a medium sized reasonable looking plant (I buy plant starts at Lowes). Cucumbers like heat too but are sprawling--do you have a good place for a trellis?

  10. #20
    denasqu's Avatar
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    Yeah, I've got to keep in mind that [successful] gardening is a pretty big commitment. I got a pot of herb plants a few weeks ago for my birthday and I've already killed it.

    I probably should start REAL SLOW with one thing. I love cabbage, not too crazy about cucumbers... except when they're pickles.. can you grow pickles? But a trellis would be cool. I've already got a couple with flowering stuff on them.
    "If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat?" - Tom Snyder, talk show host

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