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Thread: Icky, dangerous habit or Grok's good eats? page

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    LX's Avatar
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    Every week I roast myself a chicken. Partially because I love chicken and partially because a nice gelatinous chicken stock is one of the most versatile things to keep in the kitchen.


    Not long ago I cracked open a bone and tried the marrow inside - mmmMMM good. Since then I've taken to chewing the ends off the softened bones and eating the marrow inside. I'm not worried about bone shards since the bones just crumble at light pressure (the parts I eat at least). It's tasty, but is it dangerous?


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    Everyone RAVES about marrow

    Well, I say everyone... I've not tried it myself. But it's full of fatty goodness, so enjoy!

    You can even get special bone-shaped spoons to help...


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    I have chewed chicken bones since I was a kid, and my grandma gave me chicken feet from the soup. I love to knaw on bones.


    Sooze


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    I think there's lots of physical evidence of paleolithic humans cracking open bones to get at the marrow.

    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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    Try buffalo femurs for marrow


    I cooked some of these recently, and measured the marrow at about 1" by 1 1/2" in width. I skimmed off about 6 cups of marrow fat from just four bones. Tastes great in soups!


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kteague/4364729550/


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    Oh. I thought we were going to talk about nose-picking.

    Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

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    DebFM's Avatar
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    Honestly, my first thought was eating road kill! :P


    Marrow is yummy, though!


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    I always get at the marrow when I can, and also eat softened cartilage when the meat has been well enough cooked for it to be chewed easily. Also, we get some of the same goodness from "aspic", the gelatin from slow-roasting meat or chicken. Bony soups (oxtail, chicken stock, etc.) have some of this same goodness in them, too. Very healthy for the intestines. I chew on the softened ends of chicken bones as well. After all, bone is full of good things to make our own bones.


    People buy glucosamine and chondroitin and bone meal as supplements, to take for their arthritis and aches and pains --- but they throw away the very sources of it after they roast meat, eating the muscle meat and tossing the rest. I remember reading that Inuit ate the organ meat, but gave the muscle meat to their dogs.


    After I've polished off a roasted chicken, I have a little pile of the middle part of the bones, plus chewed up bits and pieces. I used to throw these away, but now I bury them in the garden. It's all food, after all, and plants and soil critters need to eat just like we do. So far I've never had any wandering animal digging them up. By the time they've been reduced to such slivers and bits, and buried under a lot of damp mulch and a little soil, they don't send out much of a "yum" message.


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    @BarbeyGirl - Ewwwwwww, lol


    @DebFM - I've done that before, but I wouldn't say it's a habit


    @PDL - I'll have to try burying the bones once the ground thaws. It'd probably do the roses some good.


  10. #10
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    LX -- ah, the roses ...


    By the way, if you drink "real" coffee, the roses love a mulch of the coffee grounds.


    I bury most of the vegetable trimmings, fruit rinds, etc., because I used to compost them, but then I read my favorite gardening book ("Gaia's Garden" by Toby Hemenway, highly recommended) and he talked about his disgust with compost piles -- first, the labor to turn them over and over, and he believes in encouraging soil life of all kinds and sizes -- a healthy soil is 70% alive by weight! Anyway, in a heap of compost material, the various critters find their own levels and associations. He calls them his "microherds", like he was a shepherd, or something. And when he turned the piles he was attacking them, busting up their houses, turning their children out in the cold! and second, he found after a compost pile was finished and he moved the material to the growing beds, that the soil under it was rich and fertile and softened down over a foot! And here was this perfect soil for growing things, in a place where nothing would be planted! So he started "sheet composting" instead, with everything starting out where it was going to end up, hiding under a tactful layer of mulch. So I started cycling the kitchen refuse directly into the beds the same way.


    Then I started looking at the beautiful dense lamb leg bones from my local source of lamb, and I just hated throwing them away. I mean, what good would all that nice bone do in a landfill?? But they were too dense to grind at home. Then I figured out what to do -- put them in the firebox of the woodstove, back in the corner, then have a fire, and when it was all cold again, shovel out the corner, now charred and fragile and easy to break up and move to the garden.


    Probably more than anyone wants to hear -- anyway, your roses should probably thank you. Plus the chicken remains won't stink up the garbage can. One hope you ate everything off there which could be eaten before setting aside the bones, or boiled it off into soup. They get less yucky that way.


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