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Thread: What vegies did Grok mainly eat? page

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    sebzzz's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    In a follow up to the recent post about problems related to high consumption of raw cruciferous vegies, I'm curious as to what vegetables did Grok really eat in a consistent basis. (The post: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...test-discovery! )


    Some good pieces of info was thrown in the post, like this one from the Weston Price foundation: http://www.westonaprice.org/Bearers-...n-Science.html


    Looks like most findings says Grok stayed away from mass amounts of green leafy vegetables. Makes sense since they are a very low source of calorie. Fruits, tubers, roots, meats and fats are much more satisfying.


    Also, never saw wild broccoli, spinach or cabbage in the woods, but I can imagine more clearly wild sources of fruits and tubers.


    Guessing that those facts are real, one could make a list of basic fruits and vegies to include abundantly in the diet while eating the others sporadically.


    Do you guys think someone could get deficient in some minerals or anti-oxidant if he lowers his intake of green vegetables? Or could it be the opposite since those vegies could potentially block the absorption of others?


    The other thing to consider is that if the main source of carbs switches from crecuferous vegies to tubers and root vegies, one would get much more fructose, witch is a problem for many people. I gess fructose wasn't that much of a problem for Grok and that we developed the problems from years of bad foods.
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    The problem with this idea is that Grok didn't have access to many (if any) edible tubers prior to about 50-60,000 years ago. Native African yams are inedible without processing.


    There were fruits available in Africa, but If you look at modern Africans, you will see that they don't think much of fruit. The quote from the botanists tracking down the historical fruit and veg of Africa was:
    [quote]

    Further, many African cultures—like many others—regarded fruits less as daily fare than a refreshing snack, child food, or some other kind of non-serious indulgence
    </blockquote>


    It&#39;s quite possible that paleo man was very similar to the Neanderthals and was highly carnivorous, which would explain our reaction to a quite low intake of carbs.


    The most well known native African fruit is watermelon, which is basically just sugar and water. I can&#39;t see it being a valuable addition to the diet.


    * Just some info for interest - broccoli and cabbage are cultivars of the same species of plant.


    The wild version is only vaguely similar in look to it&#39;s modern variations of kale, Chinese broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts or broccoli and the flower is 7 foot tall.


    Here&#39;s a shot of some of the variation we have cultivated:





    A perfect example of how much we have changed fruit and veg since cultivation.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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    You&#39;re the man, Tarlach. The more of your posts I read, the more I lean towards vlc/zc.


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    So Tarlach what veggies do you eat? I mean, like as a side to some pork belly?

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    To be honest I like all of Tarlach&#39;s advise ! I agree with Funkadelic that Tarlach is the man !!


    Tarlach you need to post your workout details before and after you started heavy strength training.. I think it will be one of the most beneficial and inspiring threads of all..


    Cheers !


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    sebzzz's Avatar
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    I can&#39;t seem to wrap my head around ZC/VLC longterm. I guess it&#39;s a big stretch for me, but I&#39;m very curious about it.


    What about the acid/base balance, low vitamin C, uric acid and all the other concerns? I hear it is more than possible to get scurvy eating ZC.


    Do the advocates think that it&#39;s good for everyone, even those with prior problems? Is the extra stress on kidneys from protein and ketone bodies a concern?

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    Tarlach's Avatar
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    @Tara: When we eat with guests (ie. make roast pork belly I will eat some broccoli, cauliflower and maybe onion and/or mushroom. We sometimes have open hamburgers with lettuce, onion, mushroom and a (very) little carrot.

    The majority of the time it is pretty much just meat.


    @sebzzz: I honestly don&#39;t think acid/base balance is worth worrying about. It is not possible to get scurvy while eating fresh meat.
    [quote]

    Vilhjalmur Stefansson, an arctic explorer who lived among the Eskimos, proved that the all meat diet they consumed did not lead to vitamin deficiencies. He participated in a study in New York&#39;s Bellevue Hospital in 1935, where he and a companion ate nothing but meat for a year while under close medical observation, yet remained in good health. Some Antarctic expeditions, such as Scott&#39;s two expeditions and Shackleton&#39;s Ross Sea party, suffered from scurvy, mainly during inland sledge journeys when the men had access to very limited range of food, virtually none of it fresh. Scurvy was rare or absent when they had access to a wider range of stored food or relied on seal meat. Refined carbohydrates seem to accelerate the process of depleting vitamin C. Insulin in the bloodstream causes all amino acids, except for tryptophan, to be stored as fat. Tryptophan competes to enter the bloodstream, causing less vitamin C to be available to the body. This could be one reason sailors and explorers, with their rations heavy with hard tack biscuits and refined carbohydrates, were so prone to scurvy.
    </blockquote>


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scurvy


    I don&#39;t believe that there is any dietary requirement for fruit and veg, but I&#39;m not going to say you shouldn&#39;t ever have any. I would suggest avoiding the stuff that is just all sugar.


    Analysis of modern hunter gatherer tribes shows we can live well on a decent range of diets. What the perfect ratio is I&#39;m yet to find out, but I think it is pretty low carb.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  8. #8
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    edit: Wow, beaten... I was just about to post about Stefansson.


    I&#39;ll post this anyway.


    Stefansson is also a figure of considerable interest in dietary circles, especially those with an interest in very low-carbohydrate diets. Stefansson documented the fact that most Inuit lived on a diet of about 90% meat and fish, often going 6–9 months a year on nothing but meat and fish—essentially, a no-carbohydrate diet. He found that he and his fellow European-descent explorers were also perfectly healthy on such a diet. When medical authorities questioned him on this, he and a fellow explorer agreed to undertake a study under the auspices of the Journal of the American Medical Association to demonstrate that they could eat a 100% meat diet in a closely-observed laboratory setting for the first several weeks, with paid observers for the rest of an entire year. The results were published in the Journal, and both men were perfectly healthy on such a diet, without vitamin supplementation or anything else in their diet except meat.[10]

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