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Thread: Diatomaceous earth - anyone have bad side effects? page 8

  1. #71
    noodletoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojohaligo View Post
    3.FOOD GRADE DIATOMACEOUS EARTH HEALTH BENEFITS FOR
    "As a daily supplement, many believe that its most beneficial use is for internal cleansing by aiding in the elimination of intestinal parasites, which are not able to develop an immunity to the sharp edges of DE." - this is the part that bothers me.
    me too. no matter how tiny i prefer not to purposefully ingest shards of anything.

    4.Diatomaceous earth has many benefits
    "The sharp points found on fossilized diatom exoskeletons create a safe and non-toxic strong abrasive that scrubs intestinal walls and cuts up any parasites present in the digestive tract."
    what else is it cutting up if i am parasite-free? i live with clean municipal water and don't keep any farm animals in my condo.

    5. Diatomaceous Earth - food grade powder - More Than Alive
    "Diatomaceous Earth is very hard. On the hardness scale where diamonds are a 9, DE is a 7. This is very important, because as those millions of tiny hard and sharp DE cylinders pass through the small and large intestines, they "scrub" the walls. After only a few months of taking DE, the intestine wall is no longer coated with mucus and molds but CLEAN!!"
    YIPES! mucous on my intestinal linings is SUPPOSED to be there. i'm not supposed to be squeaky clean in there.

    6.Benefits Of Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth | LIVESTRONG.COM
    "Its abrasive components are able to remove layers of toxins stuck to the colon walls."
    the colon cleanses itself, without pointy bits jabbing and stabbing their way through.

    yeah, erm, no thanks.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    – Ernest Hemingway

  2. #72
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    hmm.. if i ate this, and i admit i am curious, i wouldn't do tablespoons at a time for the simple fact that if stomach acid doesn't melt it down it might feel like defecating a loofa
    beautiful
    yeah you are

    I mean there's so many ants in my eyes! And there are so many TVs, microwaves, radios... I think, I can't, I'm not 100% sure what we have here in stock.. I don't know because I can't see anything! Our prices, I hope, aren't too low!

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by bloodorchid View Post
    defecating a loofa
    snort-laughing
    My sorely neglected blog - http://ThatWriterBroad.com

  4. #74
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    All truth passes through three stages

    First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. ~Arthur Schopenhauer, German philosopher

    4.Diatomaceous earth has many benefits
    "The sharp points found on fossilized diatom exoskeletons create a safe and non-toxic strong abrasive that scrubs intestinal walls and cuts up any parasites present in the digestive tract."

    what else is it cutting up if i am parasite-free? i live with clean municipal water and don't keep any farm animals in my condo.
    Do you walk barefoot in the grass? Parasites from bird & dog poop. Do you shake people's hands, or unconsciously wipe your nose or rub eyes during the day? Do you think the people's hands you shake or the meat or veggies you eat, or the door knobs you open, or the money you handle is not subjecting you/us to at least some buggers? Ok, we don't live in a tropical fecal/bacterial/parasitic schmorgasbord like India (been there, done that: those tropical worms & parasites & got rid of them too w/out drugs, numerous times in different 3rd world countries). Even American inner-city dwellers are exposed to buggers very day. They live on us, in us, around us, & mostly its a happy mutual coexistence. Sometimes not.

    I have been sick w/ buggers maybe 8 times in 35 years of international travel in some dirty places. Once or twice I prayed for death, to end the suffering. I've brought sickness home to the USA. I've since learned how to not get sick when I travel, & D.E. is a part of that international travel kit, for emergencies only as it is kinda bulky.

    5. Diatomaceous Earth - food grade powder - More Than Alive
    "Diatomaceous Earth is very hard. On the hardness scale where diamonds are a 9, DE is a 7. This is very important, because as those millions of tiny hard and sharp DE cylinders pass through the small and large intestines, they "scrub" the walls. After only a few months of taking DE, the intestine wall is no longer coated with mucus and molds but CLEAN!!"

    YIPES! mucous on my intestinal linings is SUPPOSED to be there. i'm not supposed to be squeaky clean in there.

    Dude, I don't consume D.E. daily for months. Never said I did, nor did I endorse that out right. I merely posted 10 search results, & NOT all 10 of them were testimonials btw. Cherry pick much?

    I do D.E. in short bursts, for a few weeks, twice a year during seasons' change, like now & in the spring. I do know people who have done it daily for a long time, but my own results and theirs are inadmissible, coz....are we're lying...? Like there's some conspiracy, or that website selling it for $5 a lb is some syndicate getting rich off that wholesale price...

    I bought mine from my local farmer dude I get my organic grass-fed milk & pastured eggs from. He likely is making a lot more bucks buying it from those guys for $5/lb or even $4/lb in bulk & reselling it to idiots like me for $14/lb! My nails, skin & hair (yes I do have hair), all are healthier, after just 1 week (impossible? People been saying the same thing abt Primal sometimes too, 1 week full Primal, feeling great!) People have been mentioning this to me the past couple of weeks, about my skin glowing ... Coincidence? Maybe...

    I'm eating the same massive amounts of avos, coconut fat, butter, red palm oil & olive oil & meats & cheeses as before, still drinking the same 8-10 glasses of filtered water. So what changed...? The D.E. this past week

    Ridicule &/or dismiss it all you want, I'll continue to do D.E. 2-3 times a year, regardless of what others think. The science is there if you'll take your head out of the real sand & do some reading (Googling doesn't automatically mean its crap, same with Wiki, though some Wiki IS CRAP, lol.

    As there are medical & university studies in PDF form online, the search engine used is irrelevant. The science is science (if it's good science) & testimonials DO matter to those people who lives its affects (my testimonial matters to me), regardless of where or how you access it, (or whether you discount it or ridicule it).

    My testimonial is my story, my truth, so piss off if you think I've got some hidden agenda, like I profit somehow if you order or take D.E. I spend time here to learn from Monsieur Sisson, & to learn from others here who are smarter, more experienced or better read than I am, to help others and to be helped. Sometimes there's entertainment on hand too. But there's some real pissants here too. That's life... I'm sticking around til I get my fill...

    Don't others ridicule, discount & poke holes into Paleo/Primal living too? Sheesh...
    Last edited by Betorq; 09-30-2012 at 06:45 PM.
    "Science is not belief but the will to find out." ~ Anonymous
    "Culture of the mind must be subservient to the heart." ~ Gandhi
    "The flogging will continue until morale improves." ~ Unknown


  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojohaligo View Post
    "Diatomaceous Earth is extremely hard. Where diamonds are a 9, Diatomaceous Earth is a 7.
    That is not true. The hardness of DE is only 1 to 1.5. I addressed this myth here:

    Alt/Trad Medical Review

  6. #76
    Betorq's Avatar
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    James, save your breath, or your keyboard stroke...

    Anyone who is curious can find the info, or try D.E. for themselves. It's not like eating glass nor is it sand.
    "Science is not belief but the will to find out." ~ Anonymous
    "Culture of the mind must be subservient to the heart." ~ Gandhi
    "The flogging will continue until morale improves." ~ Unknown


  7. #77
    meeme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Betorq View Post
    James, save your breath, or your keyboard stroke...

    Anyone who is curious can find the info, or try D.E. for themselves. It's not like eating glass nor is it sand.
    I've been following this thread with interest and I will do more research. I may even try it for myself and I'm wondering if I can use this with my horses for parasites fall and spring. As I said, I'll do research.

    Thank You both for the information and my thanks to everyone for the discussion. I had not known about using DE internally. Only while gardening organically.

  8. #78
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    Biol Trace Elem Res. 2002 Dec;89(3):251-61.
    Silicon deprivation decreases collagen formation in wounds and bone, and ornithine transaminase enzyme activity in liver.
    Seaborn CD, Nielsen FH.
    Source

    University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI, USA.
    Abstract

    We have shown that silicon (Si) deprivation decreases the collagen concentration in bone of 9-wk-old rats. Finding that Si deprivation also affects collagen at different stages in bone development, collagen-forming enzymes, or collagen deposition in other tissues would have implications that Si is important for both wound healing and bone formation. Therefore, 42 rats in experiment 1 and 24 rats in experiment 2 were fed a basal diet containing 2 or 2.6 microg Si/g, respectively, based on ground corn and casein, and supplemented with either 0 or 10 microg Si/g as sodium metasilicate. At 3 wk, the femur was removed from 18 of the 42 rats in experiment 1 for hydroxyproline analysis. A polyvinyl sponge was implanted beneath the skin of the upper back of each of the 24 remaining rats. Sixteen hours before termination and 2 wk after the sponge had been implanted, each rat was given an oral dose of 14C-proline (1.8 microCi/100 g body wt). The total amount of hydroxyproline was significantly lower in the tibia and sponges taken from Si-deficient animals than Si-supplemented rats. The disintegrations per minute of 14C-proline were significantly higher in sponge extracts from Si- deficient rats than Si-supplemented rats. Additional evidence of aberrations in proline metabolism with Si deprivation was that liver ornithine aminotransferase was significantly decreased in Si-deprived animals in experiment 2. Findings of an increased accumulation of 14C-proline and decreased total hydroxyproline in implanted sponges and decreased activity of a key enzyme in proline synthesis (liver ornithine aminotransferase) in Si-deprived animals indicates an aberration in the formation of collagen from proline in sites other than bone that is corrected by Si. This suggests that Si is a nutrient of concern in wound healing as well as bone formation.


    Biol Trace Elem Res. 2002 Dec;89(3):239-50.
    Dietary silicon and arginine affect mineral element composition of rat femur and vertebra.
    Seaborn CD, Nielsen FH.
    Source

    University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI, USA.
    Abstract

    Both arginine and silicon affect collagen formation and bone mineralization. Thus, an experiment was designed to determine if dietary arginine would alter the effect of dietary silicon on bone mineralization and vice versa. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to groups of 12 in a 2 x 2 factorially arranged experiment. Supplemented to a ground corn/casein basal diet containing 2.3 microg Si/g and adequate arginine were silicon as sodium metasilicate at 0 or 35 microg/g diet and arginine at 0 or 5 mg/g diet. The rats were fed ad libitum deionized water and their respective diets for 8 wk. Body weight, liver weight/body weight ratio, and plasma silicon were decreased, and plasma alkaline phosphatase activity was increased by silicon deprivation. Silicon deprivation also decreased femoral calcium, copper, potassium, and zinc concentrations, but increased the femoral manganese concentration. Arginine supplementation decreased femoral molybdenum concentration but increased the femoral manganese concentration. Vertebral concentrations of phosphorus, sodium, potassium, copper, manganese, and zinc were decreased by silicon deprivation. Arginine supplementation increased vertebral concentrations of sodium, potassium, manganese, zinc, and iron. The arginine effects were more marked in the silicon-deprived animals, especially in the vertebra. Germanium concentrations of the femur and vertebra were affected by an interaction between silicon and arginine; the concentrations were decreased by silicon deprivation in those animals not fed supplemental arginine. The change in germanium is consistent with a previous finding by us suggesting that this element may be physiologically important, especially as related to bone DNA concentrations. The femoral and vertebral mineral findings support the contention that silicon has a physiological role in bone formation and that arginine intake can affect that role.


    Biol Trace Elem Res. 1994 Aug;42(2):151-64.
    Effects of germanium and silicon on bone mineralization.
    Seaborn CD, Nielsen FH.
    Source

    United States Department of Agriculture, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, ND 58202.
    Abstract

    The chemical properties of Ge are similar to Si. This study investigated whether Ge can substitute for, or is antagonistic to, Si in bone formation. Sixty male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to treatment groups of 12 and 6 in a 2 x 4 factorially arranged experiment. The independent variables were, per gram fresh diet, Si (as sodium metasilicate) at 0 or 25 micrograms and Ge (as sodium germanate) at 0, 5, 30, or 60 micrograms. Results confirmed that Ge does not enhance Si deprivation and provided evidence that Ge apparently can replace Si in functions that influence bone composition. When Si was lacking in the diet, calcium and magnesium concentrations of the femur were decreased; this was reversed by feeding either Ge and/or Si. Similar effects were found for zinc, sodium, iron, manganese, and potassium of vertebra. There were some responses to Si deprivation that Ge could not reverse; Ge did not increase femur copper, sodium, or phosphorus or decrease molybdenum of vertebra, effects that were evoked by Si supplementation. Additionally, some findings suggested that 60 micrograms Ge/g diet could be a toxic intake for the rat. On the other hand, some responses induced by Ge indicate that this element may be acting physiologically other than as a substitute for Si. Germanium itself affected bone composition. Germanium supplementation decreased Si and molybdenum in the femur and increased DNA in tibia. Regardless of the amount of Si fed, animals fed 30 micrograms Ge/g diet had increased tibial DNA compared to animals fed 0 or 60 micrograms Ge; however, tibial DNA of animals fed 30 micrograms Ge was not statistically different from those animals fed 5 micrograms Ge. Thus, Ge may be of nutritional importance.


    Biol Trace Elem Res. 1992 Aug;34(2):185-95.
    Silicon metabolism. The interrelations of inorganic silicon (Si) with systemic iron (Fe), Zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) pools in the rat.
    Najda J, Gmiński J, Drózdz M, Danch A.
    Source

    Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Silesian Medical Academy, Medyków, Poland.
    Abstract

    The influence of silicon treatment on the levels of trace elements zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and iron (Fe) in serum and tissues was studied in rats. The concentrations of silicon, iron, and zinc were estimated in samples of sera and tissues of rats receiving per os a soluble, inorganic silicon compound--sodium metasilicate nonahydrate (Na2SiO3.9H2O), dissolved in the drinking water. An increase of copper concentrations in liver and aortic walls in the experimental group was observed, with simultaneous reduction of zinc amounts in serum and all the tissue samples in the course of the experiment. The iron concentrations in the analyzed samples did not show any significant changes between both groups. The silicon levels in serum and in all the examined tissues were significantly higher in the tested group. The results provide evidence for the silicon interaction with copper and zinc, which could result in a number of metabolic process modifications, antiatheromatous activity among them.


    Biol Trace Elem Res. 1991 Dec;31(3):235-47.
    The effect of silicon (Si) on lipid parameters in blood serum and arterial wall.
    Najda J, Gminski J, Drozdz M, Flak A.
    Source

    Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Silesian Medical Academy, Katowice, Poland.
    Abstract

    The influence of silicon treatment on the levels of lipid parameters of blood serum and aortic wall was studied in rats. The concentrations of total cholesterol, phospholipids, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-phospholipids were measured in sera of rats receiving per os a soluble, inorganic silicon compound--sodium metasilicate nonahydrate (Na2SiO3.9H2O)--dissolved in the drinking water. In the aortic tissue levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids were estimated. An increase in HDL-cholesterol and HDL-phospholipid concentrations, with a simultaneous decrease of LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels, was observed in the sera of the tested group. The levels of total cholesterol and phospholipids in the sera, as well as the concentrations of lipids in the aortic walls, showed no significant differences. The results obtained could provide evidence for the existence of an additional mechanism of silicon antiatheromatous action, concerning the modification of activity of enzymatic systems involved in lipids metabolism.

  9. #79
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    J Nutr Health Aging. 2007 Mar-Apr;11(2):99-110.
    Silicon and bone health.
    Jugdaohsingh R.
    Source

    Rayne Institute, Gastrointestinal Laboratory, St Thomas' Hospital, London. ravin.jugdaohsingh@kcl.ac.uk
    Abstract

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health.

    Full article: SILICON AND BONE HEALTH


    Nutr J. 2010 Oct 14;9:44.
    Absorption of silicon from artesian aquifer water and its impact on bone health in postmenopausal women: a 12 week pilot study.
    Li Z, Karp H, Zerlin A, Lee TY, Carpenter C, Heber D.
    Source

    Center for Human Nutrition, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. zli@mednet.ucla.edu
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:

    Decreased bone mineral density and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women represents a growing source of physical limitations and financial concerns in our aging population. While appropriate medical treatments such as bisphosphonate drugs and hormone replacement therapy exist, they are associated with serious side effects such as osteonecrosis of the jaw or increased cardiovascular risk. In addition to calcium and vitamin D supplementation, previous studies have demonstrated a beneficial effect of dietary silicon on bone health. This study evaluated the absorption of silicon from bottled artesian aquifer water and its effect on markers of bone metabolism.
    METHODS:

    Seventeen postmenopausal women with low bone mass, but without osteopenia or osteoporosis as determined by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) were randomized to drink one liter daily of either purified water of low-silicon content (PW) or silicon-rich artesian aquifer water (SW) (86 mg/L silica) for 12 weeks. Urinary silicon and serum markers of bone metabolism were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks and analyzed with two-sided t-tests with p < 0.05 defined as significant.
    RESULTS:

    The urinary silicon level increased significantly from 0.016 ± 0.010 mg/mg creatinine at baseline to 0.037 ± 0.014 mg/mg creatinine at week 12 in the SW group (p = 0.003), but there was no change for the PW group (0.010 ± 0.004 mg/mg creatinine at baseline vs. 0.009 ± 0.006 mg/mg creatinine at week 12, p = 0.679). The urinary silicon for the SW group was significantly higher in the silicon-rich water group compared to the purified water group (p < 0.01). NTx, a urinary marker of bone resorption did not change during the study and was not affected by the silicon water supplementation. No significant change was observed in the serum markers of bone formation compared to baseline measurements for either group.
    CONCLUSIONS:

    These findings indicate that bottled water from artesian aquifers is a safe and effective way of providing easily absorbed dietary silicon to the body. Although the silicon did not affect bone turnover markers in the short-term, the mineral's potential as an alternative prevention or treatment to drug therapy for osteoporosis warrants further longer-term investigation in the future.

    Full article: Absorption of silicon from artesian aquifer water and its impact on bone health in postmenopausal women: a 12 week pilot study


    Science. 1970 Jan 16;167(3916):279-80.
    Silicon: a possible factor in bone calcification.
    Carlisle EM.
    Abstract

    Silicon, a relatively unknown trace element in nutritional research, has been uniquely localized in active calcification sites in young bone. Silicon increases directly with calcium at relatively low calcium concentrations and falls below the detection limit at compositions approaching hydroxyapatite. It is suggested that silicon is associated with calcium in an early stage of calcification.


    Calcif Tissue Int. 2000 Jan;66(1):53-5.
    Effect of silicon supplement on osteopenia induced by ovariectomy in rats.
    Rico H, Gallego-Lago JL, Hernández ER, Villa LF, Sanchez-Atrio A, Seco C, Gérvas JJ.
    Source

    Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Alcalá, 28801, Madrid, Spain.
    Abstract

    The effect of silicon (Si) supplement on preventing bone mass loss induced by ovariectomy (OVX) in rats was investigated. Three groups of 15, 100-day-old female Wistar rats each, with a mean initial weight of approximately 260 g per animal, were selected for the present study. One of the experimental group consisting of 15 OVX rats was fed a diet supplemented with 500 mg of Si per kg of feed (Si + OVX). The other two groups consisting of 15 OVX and 15 sham-OVX rats did not receive these supplements. Morphometric (weight and length) and densitometric studies with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were performed on the whole femur and 5th lumbar vertebra of each animal 30 days after the experiment. The Si + OVX rats did not show a loss of bone mass induced by OVX at axial level (5th lumbar vertebra) or periphery (femur). Nonetheless, a significant increase (ANOVA with Bonferroni/Dunn post hocs test) of longitudinal development of the femur (P < 0.0001) was patent. These results, obtained through the measurements of axial and peripheral bones, warrant closer scrutiny in connection with the Si inhibitory effect on bone mass loss as well as the stimulatory effect on bone formation. Both actions, namely, inhibition of resorption and stimulation of formation, infer that Si may have a potential therapeutic application in the treatment of involutive osteoporosis.


    J Bone Miner Res. 2004 Feb;19(2):297-307. Epub 2003 Dec 16.
    Dietary silicon intake is positively associated with bone mineral density in men and premenopausal women of the Framingham Offspring cohort.
    Jugdaohsingh R, Tucker KL, Qiao N, Cupples LA, Kiel DP, Powell JJ.

    Source

    Gastrointestinal Laboratory, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom. ravin.jugdaohsingh@kcl.ac.uk

    Abstract

    The role of dietary silicon in bone health in humans is not known. In a cross-sectional, population-based study (2847 participants), associations between dietary silicon intake and BMD were investigated. Dietary silicon correlated positively and significantly with BMD at all hip sites in men and premenopausal women, but not in postmenopausal women, suggesting that increased silicon intake is associated with increased cortical BMD in these populations.

    INTRODUCTION:

    Osteoporosis is a burgeoning health and economic issue. Agents that promote bone formation are widely sought. Animal and cellular data suggest that the orthosilicate anion (i.e., dietary silicon) is involved in bone formation. The intake of silicon (Si, approximately 30 mg/day) is among the highest for trace elements in humans, but its contribution to bone health is not known.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    In a cross-sectional, population-based study, we examined the association between silicon intake and bone mineral density (BMD) in 1251 men and 1596 pre- and postmenopausal women in the Framingham Offspring cohort (age, 30-87 years) at four hip sites and lumbar spine, adjusting for all potential confounding factors known to influence BMD and nutrient intake.

    RESULTS:

    Silicon intake correlated positively with adjusted BMD at four hip sites in men and premenopausal women, but not in postmenopausal women. No significant association was observed at the lumbar spine in any group. Categorical analysis by Si intake, or energy-adjusted Si intake, supported these findings, and showed large differences in BMD (up to 10%) between the highest (> 40 mg Si/day) and lowest (< 14 mg Si/day) quintiles of silicon intake. A significant association at the lumbar spine in men was also observed. Further analyses indicated that some of the effects seen for moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages on BMD might be attributed to Si intake.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    These findings suggest that higher dietary silicon intake in men and younger women may have salutary effects on skeletal health, especially cortical bone health, that has not been previously recognized. Confirmation of these results is being sought in a longitudinal study and by assessment of the influence of silicon intake on bone markers in this cohort.

  10. #80
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    Bone. 2003 Feb;32(2):127-35.
    Orthosilicic acid stimulates collagen type 1 synthesis and osteoblastic differentiation in human osteoblast-like cells in vitro.
    Reffitt DM, Ogston N, Jugdaohsingh R, Cheung HF, Evans BA, Thompson RP, Powell JJ, Hampson GN.
    Source

    Gastrointestinal Laboratory, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH, UK.
    Abstract

    Silicon deficiency in animals leads to bone defects. This element may therefore play an important role in bone metabolism. Silicon is absorbed from the diet as orthosilicic acid and concentrations in plasma are 5-20 microM. The in vitro effects of orthosilicic acid (0-50 microM) on collagen type 1 synthesis was investigated using the human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63), primary osteoblast-like cells derived from human bone marrow stromal cells, and an immortalized human early osteoblastic cell line (HCC1). Collagen type 1 mRNA expression and prolyl hydroxylase activity were also determined in the MG-63 cells. Alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin (osteoblastic differentiation) were assessed both at the protein and the mRNA level in MG-63 cells treated with orthosilicic acid. Collagen type 1 synthesis increased in all treated cells at orthosilicic acid concentrations of 10 and 20 microM, although the effects were more marked in the clonal cell lines (MG-63, HCCl 1.75- and 1.8-fold, respectively, P < 0.001, compared to 1.45-fold in the primary cell lines). Treatment at 50 microM resulted in a smaller increase in collagen type 1 synthesis (MG-63 1.45-fold, P = 0.004). The effect of orthosilicic acid was abolished in the presence of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors. No change in collagen type 1 mRNA level was seen in treated MG-63 cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin were significantly increased (1.5, 1.2-fold at concentrations of 10 and 20 microM, respectively, P < 0.05). Gene expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin also increased significantly following treatment. In conclusion, orthosilicic acid at physiological concentrations stimulates collagen type 1 synthesis in human osteoblast-like cells and enhances osteoblastic differentiation.


    BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008 Jun 11;9:85.
    Choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid supplementation as an adjunct to calcium/vitamin D3 stimulates markers of bone formation in osteopenic females: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
    Spector TD, Calomme MR, Anderson SH, Clement G, Bevan L, Demeester N, Swaminathan R, Jugdaohsingh R, Berghe DA, Powell JJ.
    Source

    Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, Kings College, London, UK. tim.spector@kcl.ac.uk
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:

    Mounting evidence supports a physiological role for silicon (Si) as orthosilicic acid (OSA, Si(OH)4) in bone formation. The effect of oral choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid (ch-OSA) on markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) was investigated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.
    METHODS:

    Over 12-months, 136 women out of 184 randomized (T-score spine < -1.5) completed the study and received, daily, 1000 mg Ca and 20 microg cholecalciferol (Vit D3) and three different ch-OSA doses (3, 6 and 12 mg Si) or placebo. Bone formation markers in serum and urinary resorption markers were measured at baseline, and after 6 and 12 months. Femoral and lumbar BMD were measured at baseline and after 12 months by DEXA.
    RESULTS:

    Overall, there was a trend for ch-OSA to confer some additional benefit to Ca and Vit D3 treatment, especially for markers of bone formation, but only the marker for type I collagen formation (PINP) was significant at 12 months for the 6 and 12 mg Si dose (vs. placebo) without a clear dose response effect. A trend for a dose-corresponding increase was observed in the bone resorption marker, collagen type I C-terminal telopeptide (CTX-I). Lumbar spine BMD did not change significantly. Post-hoc subgroup analysis (baseline T-score femur < -1) however was significant for the 6 mg dose at the femoral neck (T-test). There were no ch-OSA related adverse events observed and biochemical safety parameters remained within the normal range.
    CONCLUSION:

    Combined therapy of ch-OSA and Ca/Vit D3 had a potential beneficial effect on bone collagen compared to Ca/Vit D3 alone which suggests that this treatment is of potential use in osteoporosis. NTR 1029.

    Full article: Choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid supplementation as an adjunct to Calcium/Vitamin D3 stimulates markers of bone formation in osteopenic females: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    This is just a sampling of the research on silica available if one chooses to look. But as I pointed out there are those who are either too lazy to do the research or don't know how to read studies. So they prefer to respond with name calling and other personal attacks since they love to argue but have nothing to back up their claims with. So the best they can hope for is that their belief of constantly attacking those who prove them wrong will drive those people away.

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