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  1. #11
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    I don't do it regularly enough- but I find that when I do my sinuses and teeth do much better. Actually- after reading that article- I'm thinking I should step up the intensity for a bit.
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  2. #12
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    Oil pulling is an ayurvedic thing. In other words, it's bullshit for gullible white yuppies.

    Seriously, what is it with people who indiscriminately glom onto anything that's vaguely "eastern"? Other cultures need to be called out on their bullshit, too. If anything, western-judeo-christian bullshit is actually slightly less bullshitty than eastern bullshit.

    Is Oil Pulling A Scam? Debunking Oil Pulling - LisaBarger.com
    Last edited by Chaohinon; 02-14-2012 at 11:29 AM.
    “The whole concept of a macronutrient, like that of a calorie, is determining our language game in such a way that the conversation is not making sense." - Dr. Kurt Harris

  3. #13
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    It's real. There is some voodoo involved, like accupuncture, but I have been doing it 6 mo daily for 20 minutes with sesame oil. It doesn't cost any more than a bottle of sesame oil every couple months. I started mainly because I 'had' deep pockets in my gums. The dentist had to do painful deep cleanings every couple years and always told me to brush and floss better. I oil-pulled for 4 months prior to last cleaning and they were totally amazed. The hygenist accused me of getting cleaned somewhere else, she said it looked like I had just finished a professional cleaning! When they measured the pockets that were 9mm deep 6 mo earlier, the deepest one was 1mm and the rest were gone.

    Another thing I noticed, when I get home from work, I am always tempted to snack before dinner. Now, first thing I do is take a swig of sesame oil and swish on it as I'm changing my clothes, feeding the chickens, checking the mail, getting the paper...I spit it out after 15-20 minutes and rinse my mouth with plain water. At this point, I could go hours without eating. Remember, Dr. Jack Kruse says there are leptin receptors in the mouth!

    I read another pubmed article where they tore into oil pulling and the results were as good or better than commercial mouthwash, but the study said the action was from the 'emulsifying' of the oil with saliva that made it extremely effective. Prior to the study it was believed that the oil's anti-microbial or anti-fungal properties were at work, but this was not the case.

    If you get regular dental check-ups, try it for 6-8 weeks prior and don't tell the hygenist--let them be your guide.

    Tooth brushing, oil pulling and tissue regeneration: A review of holistic approaches to oral health
    Oil pulling
    Oil pulling, in CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine), is a procedure that involves swishing oil in the mouth for oral and systemic health benefits. It is mentioned in the Ayurvedic text Charaka Samhita where it is called Kavala or Gandusha, and is claimed to cure about 30 systemic diseases ranging from headache, migraine to diabetes and asthma. Oil pulling has been used extensively as a traditional Indian folk remedy for many years to prevent decay, oral malodor, bleeding gums, dryness of throat, cracked lips and for strengthening teeth, gums and the jaw.[16,17]
    Oil pulling therapy can be done using oils like sunflower oil or sesame oil. The sesame plant (Sesamum indicum) of the Pedaliaceae family has been considered a gift of nature to mankind for its nutritional qualities and desirable health effects. Sesame oil is considered to be the queen of oil seed crops because of its beneficiary effects.[18]
    Brushing is contra indicated in the cases of mouth ulcer, fever, indigestion, those who have tendency to vomit, asthma, cough, thirst.[18] Oil pulling can be used to clean the oral cavity in all these cases. Gandusha and Kavala Graha are two primary oral cleansing techniques; specialized therapy to treat as well as to prevent oral diseases. Gandusha involves filling the mouth completely with fluid so that gargling is impossible. In Gandush, the oral cavity is filled completely with liquid medicine, held for about 3-5 minutes, and then released. In Kavala Graha, a comfortable amount of fluid is retained with the mouth closed for about 3 minutes, and then gargled. It is a simple rejuvenating treatment, which, when done routinely, enhances the senses, maintains clarity, brings about a feeling of freshness, and invigorates the mind. These oral cleansing techniques can also benefit bad breath, dry face, dull senses, exhaustion, anorexia, loss of taste, impaired vision, sore throat, and all kapha related imbalances.
    A study was conducted by Asokan S et al (2009) to evaluate the effect of oil pulling with sesame oil on plaque-induced gingivitis, and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine mouthwash.[19] A total of 20 age-matched adolescent boys with plaque-induced gingivitis were selected for this study. They were divided randomly into the study or oil pulling group (Group I) and the control or chlorhexidine group (Group II) with 10 subjects in each group. Plaque index and modified gingival index scores were recorded for the 20 subjects and baseline plaque samples were also collected. There was a statistically significant reduction of the pre- and post-values of the plaque and modified gingival index scores in both the study and control groups (p < 0.001 in both). The oil pulling therapy showed a reduction in the plaque index, modified gingival scores, and total colony count of aerobic microorganisms in the plaque of adolescents with plaque-induced gingivitis.
    Oil pulling is a powerful detoxifying Ayurvedic technique that has recently become very popular as a CAM remedy for many different health ailments. Using this method, surgery or medication could be prevented for a number of chronic illnesses. The oil therapy is preventative as well as curative. The exciting aspect of this healing method is its simplicity. Ayurveda advises oil gargling to purify the entire system; as it holds that each section of the tongue is connected to different organ such as to the kidneys, lungs, liver, heart, small intestines, stomach, colon, and spine, similarly to reflexology and TCM.[18]
    Last edited by otzi; 02-14-2012 at 03:29 PM.

  4. #14
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    Another PubMed study:

    Effect of oil pulling on Strept... [J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent. 2008] - PubMed - NCBI

    BACKGROUND: Oil pulling has been used extensively for many years, without scientific evidence or proof, as a traditional Indian folk remedy to prevent teeth decay, oral malodor, bleeding gums, dryness of throat and cracked lips, and for strengthening the teeth, gums, and jaws.

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oil pulling with sesame oil on the count of Streptococcus mutans in plaque and saliva of children, using the Dentocult SM Strip mutans test, and to compare its efficacy with that of chlorhexidine mouthwash.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty age-matched adolescent boys were selected based on information obtained through a questionnaire. They were divided randomly into two groups: the control or chlorhexidine group (group I) and the study or oil pulling group (group II); there were ten subjects in each group. Plaque and saliva samples were collected from all the 20 subjects on the strips from the Dentocult SM kit and, after incubation, the presence of S. mutans was evaluated using the manufacturers' chart. The study group practiced oil pulling with sesame oil and the control group used chlorhexidine mouthwash for 10 min every day in the morning before brushing. Samples were collected from both groups after 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks and the efficacy of oil pulling was compared with that of chlorhexidine mouthwash.

    RESULTS: There was a reduction in the S. mutans count in the plaque and saliva samples of both the study and the control groups. The reduction in the S. mutans count in the plaque of the study group was statistically significant after 1 and 2 weeks (P=0.01 and P=0.008, respectively); the control group showed significant reduction at all the four time points (P=0.01, P=0.04, P=0.005, and P=0.005, respectively, at 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks). In the saliva samples, significant reduction in S. mutans count was seen in the control group at 48 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks (P=0.02, P=0.02, P=0.008, respectively).

    CONCLUSION: Oil pulling can be used as an effective preventive adjunct in maintaining and improving oral health.

  5. #15
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    Do you think this would work with MCT oil?

  6. #16
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    They were divided randomly into two groups: the control or chlorhexidine group (group I) and the study or oil pulling group (group II); there were ten subjects in each group.
    So compared to a creepy hexane-derived chemical (probably manufactured deep in the bowels of Monsanto's asshole, or something), natural food-grade oils are better for your teeth.
    “The whole concept of a macronutrient, like that of a calorie, is determining our language game in such a way that the conversation is not making sense." - Dr. Kurt Harris

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by primalsun View Post
    Do you think this would work with MCT oil?
    I tried coconut oil for a few days, and EVOO, neither of those reach the consistency that sesame oil does. I've heard sunflower oil is acceptable. Try it with sesame oil, pay attention to how it feels and how it looks when you spit it out, then try other oils. I think you are looking for a change in viscosity and emulsification that sesame oil provides the best. I doubt you will find anything definitive, but I'm sure there's somebody out there who will sell you the best oil ever.

  8. #18
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaohinon View Post
    So compared to a creepy hexane-derived chemical (probably manufactured deep in the bowels of Monsanto's asshole, or something), natural food-grade oils are better for your teeth.
    The takeaway for me is, if you are using a harsh chemical in your dental routine, try sesame oil. If you are looking for a cure for your liver--try something else.

  9. #19
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    Sounds interesting...my teeth could use some strengthening and whitening. Would it matter if I were to use refined coconut oil vs. EV?

    I'll check the health store for sesame oil too.

  10. #20
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    Ayurveda is actually it's own science, and has been studied with western-styled studies in india for many years, just as acupuncture and TCM herbalism was before it came to the US. unfortunately, you need to speak one of the many chinese dialects or indian-subcontinent languages to access these studies.

    That being said, feel free to believe whatever you want, from whatever sources you want.

    We decided to try an n-1. You know, that thing we do all over this web site? That thing we're always talking about? the N-1?

    The n=1 started with me. I decided to do it with coconut oil because I was looking for methods to manage my oral care. There are a lot of n-1s around about all kinds of things, like paleo getting rid of cavities naturally because there is less sugar and such. And throgh that, someone mentioned oil pulling and teeth whitening.

    And guess what? In about 15 days, it was whiter. And, the same for my husband once he started. And, he had what looked like little "cracks" in his teeth, and now, again about 15 days in, he doesn't look like that.

    So, n1 and n1. It's not science, but hey, seems to work.

    So, I'm going to keep doing it, and you can choose not to based on lack of science. that's cool.

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