Just finished watching, 'Guns, Germs' Steel' and 'The Amazing Human Journey'. Both insightful documentaries, about early human history and the growth and spread of human population. How interesting to see what a dramatic impact cereal crops have had on the ability of populations to grow and flourish. From the Fertile Crescent and Egypt, to China and Asia... the ability to farm, harvest and store grains gave those populations the 'edge' over hunter and gathers (who essentially stayed at the same levels of development). Whether you think those developments are good (in hindsight) we wouldn't all be sitting here in front of our laptops on this forum without them... and, well, lets face it, we had no real choice in the matter eh?

And yet, in their wake they left massive areas of deforested, desertification land... I never realized that it was all a result of farming!

So, the massive paradox...

Here we are, at the end of this massive leap forward, in a right sorry state. Environmentally and health wise, because of said cereal crops! With mental illness rates soaring, suicides, depression, plighting us... environmental degradation as a result of centuries of farming, blindness and stupidity and ignorance about our connection to the earth and it's fragility... I feel like I've been a part of a huge human-scientific experimental failure!

And it doesn't stop there.

Today I read about yet more destruction of hunter gatherers. Yet more knowledge lost. More people facing the end of their ways (the old ways). And the picture accompanying this, made me weep. It's here:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...0731951&type=1

I have more respect for a Warrior that protects life—for us, for our children and grandchildren and future generations –than for a false civilization and their interests!

While newspapers and television talk about the lives of celebrities, ...the chief of the Kayapo tribe received the worst news of his life: Dilma, 'The new president of Brazil, has given approval to build a huge hydroelectric plant (the third largest in the world).

It is the death sentence for all the people near the river because the dam will flood 400,000 hectares of forest. More than 40,000 Indians will have to find another place to live. The natural habitat destruction, deforestation and the disappearance of many species is a fact. '

What moves me in my very bowels, making me ashamed of being part of Western culture, is the reaction of the chief of the Kayapo community when he learned of the decision—his gesture of dignity and helplessness before the advance of capitalist progress, modern predatory civilization that does not respect the differences ...