Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Coconut Flour recipes page

  1. #1
    kimw's Avatar
    kimw is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1

    Coconut Flour recipes

    Shop Now
    I was so excited to learn about coconut flour, its health benefits, etc. Then I found a nutrition facts calculator online, and when I input the ingredients for coconut flour muffins, I almost fell off the couch!! The calories, the fat content, and the sodium are astronomical!! Of course, there are 23 g of protein in them, but WOW!

    So, I guess I would like to know if anyone can advise on this: to be concerned or not to be concerned?

  2. #2
    ib4student's Avatar
    ib4student is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    70
    What are you putting in it? Use less salt?

  3. #3
    Monika's Avatar
    Monika is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    91
    what the heck are you putting in those muffins?

  4. #4
    ChocoTaco369's Avatar
    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,614
    It's flour. All flour = processed food. Just because it's better than wheat flour doesn't make it good. Also, bear in mind that it's more calorically dense than wheat flour, so it's a great way to halt fat loss or increase fat gain. Carb intake isn't the only thing that matters, and counting carbs only appears to be successful because so many people in this world are metabolically compromised (ironically from omega 6 fats and refined flours). Dietary fat is more easily stored as body fat than carbohydrate - remember that - fat just has the advantage of keeping you much fuller much longer and generally provides more nutrient density, so people that eat higher fat/low carb tend to eat less overall calories. If you're making a cake for your birthday or cookies for a holiday, coconut flour's a great choice. Eating coconut flour pancakes and muffins every week = a decisively bad choice IMO. That's not real food.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  5. #5
    Monika's Avatar
    Monika is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    91
    @ CHOCO
    I'm not sure I understand this correctly, "Dietary fat is more easily stored as body fat than carbohydrate".

  6. #6
    unchatenfrance's Avatar
    unchatenfrance is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    788
    Did you input the information into the nutrition calculator for the whole yield or for one muffin (out of a yield of 12)? I cannot fathom how a single muffin made with any kind of flour has 23 grams of protein.

  7. #7
    ChocoTaco369's Avatar
    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,614
    Quote Originally Posted by Monika View Post
    @ CHOCO
    I'm not sure I understand this correctly, "Dietary fat is more easily stored as body fat than carbohydrate".
    It's just that - dietary fat is more easily stored as body fat than carbohydrate. Dietary fat is the simplest thing for your body to store as fat - it's already fat when you ingest it. There are benefits to dietary fat, however. Dietary fat does not cause free radical damage to the extent that carbohydrate, protein or alcohol would (assuming you're not taking in lots of PUFA's). It's the simplest macronutrient for the body to process, so it's the least stressful for us to ingest assuming it's quality fat. It also has the advantage of promoting satiety, and foods high in fat are typically high in nutrients as well. A high fat diet also promotes stable blood sugar, which is a nice thing. Basically, when you eat a high fat/low carb diet, while it's the easiest to get fat off of if you regularly overeat calories, it's the most difficult to overeat on because it promotes fullness, stable energy and high nutrition.

    Carbohydrate is more difficult to get fat off of than dietary fat if you're taking in the same caloric value. Before you eat carbohydrate, 5-10% of your calories are lost thanks to the thermic effect of food. After that, the energy is partitioned to glycogen storage. Only until your glycogen stores are full does it spill over into adipose tissue. However, there are negatives. Carbohydrate does well at immediately promoting a feeling of fullness - eating potatoes will make you feel fuller faster than eating steak - but it wears off quickly. It also causes wild swings in blood sugar, which makes your energy go through the roof and crash back down. Free radical damage is enhanced on a high carbohydrate diet because it's more difficult for your body to process, and carbohydrates are notorious for having poor nutrient density. Between a feeling of fullness that wears off quickly, poor nutrient density in foods and blood sugar swings, you find yourself constantly eating and constantly hungry on a high carbohydrate diet, resulting in chronic overeating. And with constant snacking comes constantly elevated blood sugar, which leads to insulin resistance. THAT is why people get fat off of a high carb lifestyle - poor nutrition, lack of satiety, blood sugar swings and eventually resistance to insulin and leptin. Of course, this will be much more difficult to achieve eating real foods like sweet potatoes and bananas, but the fake stuff - grain flours and processed sugars - they're an absolute nightmare.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 01-27-2012 at 01:57 PM.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  8. #8
    mosin46's Avatar
    mosin46 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    128
    1+ for coco

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •