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Thread: Dinosaur training by Brooks Kubik page

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    Blah's Avatar
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    Dinosaur training by Brooks Kubik

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    I just finished reading this book, I thought it was very well written and I'm sure it would help someone become insanely strong. I'm years away from lifting anything as heavy as he suggests and I'm yet to do any barbell work but would like to in the near future. I've got a few questions though, for any serious lifters out there, especially those who have used his ideas (the longer the better). So here goes:

    He's big on building strong tendons and ligaments, suggesting heavy singles, heavy lock outs using the top end of a lift (eg the last 2 inched of a bench or DL and heavy). Similarly for grip he suggests heavy singles for wrist lifting (curls etc) thick bars, one hand, one and two finger DL's etc. And lots of other similar ideas. Now this sound logical: put a heavy load on your tendons and ligaments, stress them and let them grow bigger and stronger (he does say to go slow, be careful, lots of rest etc.). On the downside this could just ruin your joints.

    My main question is does it work? Has people here done it for several years and are better for it, or have people done this and found that it destroyed their joints?

    Personnal stories and anecdotes would be great, scientific studies would be even better but unlikely.
    (I'm a biologist so I love science, but in this case I doubt there are studies on such advanced lifters and really I just don't have the time to go looking for myself right now)

    If people have tried this and it works without any joint damage I would be happy to add it in (with weights I can handle) when I start working on a barbell. I'll never push as hard as he suggests, since I'm not after just strenght, I want high conditioning too, but super strong grip, tendons and ligaments would be great.

    Thanks for reading
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    While I'm not super strong(415/295/505@220), I'd say I lift heavier than most people on here. I'd say I've been lifting heavy for about 5 or 6 years now(doing things like heavy singles, doubles and triples). I lifted more conventionally for about 10 years before that.

    My joints hurt much less now than before I lifted heavy. My joints, tendons and ligaments seem more resistant to injury, too. The conversations I've had with others who have done the same thing seem to confirm my experience. Of course injuries can occur, in this as in anything, but I personally see this as less risky than the alternative. In my gym, injuries seem more common in the machine users than free weight users, and more common in high rep lifters than in low, though the sample size isn't huge.

    You will likely get plenty of opinions the opposite of mine, as this is a topic of intense, unresolved debate around here. BBS and the related training styles tend to believe that style of lifting will cripple you and is ineffecient to boot. So you'll get a chance to hear both sides and make up your mind.

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    Blah,
    Read the book years ago.....followed it for a while but that style of training didn't suit my temperament or my build I thought. Brooks is a very strong, thickly muscled, thick boned man of Eastern European descent ( I think that I remember reading that's where part of his family originate from ). As such the training that works for him, may or may not work for others. That was his first book and it was written with a slightly "hardcore" approach. If I'm not mistaken I think that more recent writings have seen him mellow his approach somewhat.
    If I'm also correct he wrote ( and has just reissued ) a bodyweight training course. He turned to that style of training after suffering injuries from long term exposure to barbell training ( especially the bench press ) as he practised it. I think he's now back hitting the weights but his new affection is Olympic lifting and it's derivatives.

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    Apex,
    No need to be modest. Those are impressive numbers.

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    Thanks for the replys. My thinking is that if I add in some of these techniques at a weight thats reasonably for me, while not chasing a 400 pound bench press I should run the line between strong tendons and ligaments without the risk of extreme weights.
    www.back-to-primal.blogspot.com or on Facebook here

    My training journal if anyone is interested

    Be strong to be useful

  6. #6
    UK Guy's Avatar
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    Blah,
    Call it good timing I was just going through some old stuff and I stumbled upon an e mail conversation I'd had with Mr Kubik several years ago, which I had printed for posterity. I'd asked him about the validity of starting a rack program and whether, at my level of strength at the time, I was ready for it. He stated that if I was close to the 300 / 400 / 500 benchmarks for the bench press, squat and deadlift then I was. That was dependent on my bodyweight being a muscular 180 - 220 lbs at 5'9 to 5'11. As I was 160lbs at the time at 5'7 I could scale those benchmarks back a bit due to my lighter bodyweight. At the time, before I suffered a neck injury I had surpassed the mark in the squat, was close in the deadlift and although I didn't bench I did heavy weighted dips and was close to overhead pressing my bodyweight, and could do several handstand press ups.
    This is something for you to consider when you weigh up if you are ready to giving a rack program a try.

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