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Thread: Teaching Health Classes . . . page

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    adkatsim's Avatar
    adkatsim is offline Junior Member
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    Teaching Health Classes . . .

    Hi everyone, I know Mark did a post about Health/PE classes in schools a while ago, but I'm just starting to do a little secondary-level teaching through my university, and I'm having a lot of trouble reconciling the lessons I have to teach with the knowledge that I now have about nutrition and fitness. As a student teacher/teaching intern, I can't really change the prescribed lessons, but it's hard to be enthusiastic about telling middle school kids that fat is bad for them! Any advice?

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    Corvidae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adkatsim View Post
    Hi everyone, I know Mark did a post about Health/PE classes in schools a while ago, but I'm just starting to do a little secondary-level teaching through my university, and I'm having a lot of trouble reconciling the lessons I have to teach with the knowledge that I now have about nutrition and fitness. As a student teacher/teaching intern, I can't really change the prescribed lessons, but it's hard to be enthusiastic about telling middle school kids that fat is bad for them! Any advice?
    I work in science education, albeit for online digital solutions rather than in a classroom anymore. In my work, I too get frustrated with dealing with the inaccurate nutritional information in the textbooks I have to work with. My strategy has been to try and ignore the incorrect advice as much as possible and try and stress the aspects of it that will help the students make better health choices in the future. Examples: Most of my work on nutrition focused on understanding how to read nutrition and ingredient labels and understanding how macronutrients are broken down by the body. I also spent a lot of time explaining diabetes and blood sugar and how theyre tied to insulin; i cant tell the student to ignore the ADA advice, but at the very least i can help them understand their own situation much better, since in my experience, people are being trained to accept what their doctors tell them without question.

    Also since I work with the entire field of biology, not just nutrition, i throw in other nuggets throughout my coursework as well, such as using dwarf-wheat as an example of gibberellin mutations, and i just handily mention that 99% of the wheat on the planet is now this mutant.
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    primalrob's Avatar
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    the whole health class/nutrition class thing comes up here a lot. personally, i don't see why there's a need to editorialize the subject by saying one thing is good while another thing is bad. you can teach about macro and micro nutrients and their effects on the body without support one way or the other. and, as is true with most school subjects, if you feel you do have to teach what the ADA says, it's your job as an educator to provide other views as well. granted, middle schoolers may be a bit young for critical thinking...but it doesn't hurt to teach them that there is usually more than just one truth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Man is Truth View Post
    Doesn't it hurt you though, as an educator in a state-funded top-down command-cartel? The public union officials responsible for protecting your employment status certainly are not known for their brave defiance of convention and rejection of norms.
    yeah, school districts aren't wild about subversion, but nutrition and health are sciences, and sticking to the science is pretty safe. preaching primal is probably a bad idea, but teaching about the effects of sugar, the problems with processed food, and benefit of local and organic options is a win win. i think most people can stand behind the major principles of the primal blueprint...the fun stuff like jumping up and down about how awesome bacon is isn't really part of that.

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