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Thread: 40+/injuries/muscle mass page

  1. #1
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    Primal Fuel


    Evening


    Ive been looking at this site for months. Mr. Sisson, you are doing great things here. Ive made your beef burgundy and my two sons say its their favorite dish ever. I am convinced now that diet is 80% of the fight.


    On the other 20%. I'm 46 and am struggling to keep muscle mass. I'm 6'1" and pushing 190. I struggle with elbow tendonitis and had a torn pec four years ago so am limited to pushups and flys with no more than 40 pounds. I just can't seem to get that hardness that I had in my chest, stomach, biceps when I was young. I know alot of that is a function of age but it is still frustrating. My routine is a couple of 30 minute whole body weight workouts a week and two Bikram yoga's a week. I know some arent sold on yoga but it has done wonders for my flexibility and balance, and probably save me from back surgery.


    Can any 40 and 50 somethings give me any words of wisdom?


  2. #2
    stryker902's Avatar
    stryker902 is offline Junior Member
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    JPG,

    46 here and I feel your pain. literally..!!

    I have backed off on the weights myself and gone to

    jeffrey lyons Pilate's for Men and other bodyweight exercises. I realized i am more concerned about flexibility,balance and functional body strength as opposed to bulging muscles. You can obtain a very toned strong flexible body with bodyweight exercises Feels more primal to me than pushing weights. Pilate's was originally designed by boxer\wrestler Joseph Pilates for other boxers, wrestlers. But when he was asked to train the german army he came to America and started in NYC where it cought on with the dance companies. The book by jeff Lyons is his original 100 exercises to keep in top form.

    Brian


  3. #3
    PrimalWannabeGirl's Avatar
    PrimalWannabeGirl is offline Senior Member
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    Hey, there...I'm 54 years old, former long-distance cyclist and Crossfit addict, two years out from extensive injuries and surgery and just starting to engage in regular physical activity.


    I just finished reading the Primal Blueprint, and if I could hug Mark Sisson for writing it, I would. If it was around prior to my overtraining and breaking, I might have avoided the injuries, burnout, and adrenal fatigue that has taken me two years to recover from.


    I don't know if it's words of wisdom, but from my experience, I would say there is one magic word for 'older' folks: RECOVER, RECOVER, RECOVER.


    PWG (Sooze)


  4. #4
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    Hi jpg, like PWG done the long distance cycling, tapped out the adrenals etc, mid to late forties.


    If I were you I would give the bikram a miss, and move to ashtanga, you will gain flexible strength, its great for men that want muscle without the bulk. bikram regardless of what anyone says engages the sympathetic nervous system which is bad for your adrenals. When we get to a certain age, they really do take longer to recover, so you want to protect them from any unnecessary stress. I have practiced ashtanga and vinyasa with some men with beautiful bodies, in their middle age, from practicing ashtanga, very strong and light.


  5. #5
    ascent's Avatar
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    JPG,


    At this point in life, we're all suffering at least a few nagging injuries, whether it's from an accident of some sort or just the natural by-product of an athletic lifestyle.


    That said, I've found the PB approach to food and exercise tends to address a lot of the chronic-use problems. I did Crossfit for years, along with jiu-jitsu, climbing and distance running and whatever else popped up. Now I tend to focus more on a sport (climbing or surfing) and work out when I can't get out to the rock or the beach.


    So, I guess my best advice is to make your workout fun (pick a sport/activity and use it as the centerpiece) and then hit the gym (or better: outside) a couple times a week for short, intense lifting/body-weight exercises and some sort of sprints.


    In addition to Mark's guidelines for exercise, you might check out some of Art De Vaney and Clarence Bass' stuff regarding muscle mass and older folks. At a bare minimum, it will inspire you.


    Yoga seems like a good thing to explore, especially if you find it beneficial and fun.


    Finally, to echo Sooze above: Recovery is something we need to focus on, especially after particularly intense workouts. Eat right and sleep enough and you'll feel and look as healthy as you are.


    Good luck.


  6. #6
    one_eye_mike's Avatar
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    Huh, I'm 45 and hit the weights hard. With proper form you shouldn't be injuring your self. There's guys much older then me at my gym that lift very intensely, like me.


    I've not shown any lack of ability to increase muscle mass. You might look into having your testosterone and HgH level checked.


  7. #7
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    Thanks for the great advice. Shelby, can you elaborate on your comments? It sounds like you are pretty attuned to the two yogas. Why would bikram tap the adrenals, but ashtanga wouldnt. I would love to do bikram twice a week and ashtanga twice a week, eliminating weights altogether. But I have 30 years of going to the gym 3 days a week in my genes, and pulling the plug altogether makes my head spin. I'm pretty convinced that the years in the gym (using bad-self taught form) is what has screwed my body up.


  8. #8
    Roland's Avatar
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    I'm 42 and gaining mass just fine, so keeping it shouldn't be a huge issue. Resistance training once or twice a week, assuming enough load, should do it to keep it.


    I don't know how you tore your pec, but switching to a safer chest exercise than the fly would be a good step. Weighted pushups or db bench presses with good and safe form would likely be better. The fly puts your pec in an extreme stretch position with little support to save you.


  9. #9
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    jpg, sorry I missed your questions, see the hot yoga thread for an elaboration on why Bikram is 'anti-yoga' IMO.


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