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  1. #1
    interzone's Avatar
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    Gestational Diabetes Test and Primal Eating

    ****Updated in post #7****

    I found some old threads on this but wanted to bring the issue up again to see if anyone has links to research articles or other advice for me.

    I am 25 weeks pregnant and did the 1 hour oral glucose tolerance test on Monday. Passing is <140mg/dL, and my glucose level at 1 hour was 146mg/dL. I've done some preliminary research, and it appears that my low carb (<160g every day, <125g most days) and high protein diet may have set me up to fail. I certainly don't get 100g carbs (and certainly not 100g glucose!) in a single sitting, so I'm having a very hard time understanding how this test would be physiologically relevant to my way of eating or would tell me anything useful. Furthermore, at 12 weeks I had a non-fasting blood glucose test about 2 hours after breakfast (eggs, ham, banana) and the number was 71mg/dL.

    I thought that perhaps I had two options:
    1) Carb-load the three days prior to the 3 hour test
    2) Refuse the 3 hour test but agree to test my glucose myself after meals or let the OB's office test me after breakfast/lunch.

    Thanks everyone for any tips/suggestions/etc!
    Last edited by interzone; 02-07-2012 at 11:53 AM.

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    I would refuse the test. That's what I did when I was pregnant.

    There are two factors at work here for you: 1.) Drinking that sugar-loaded crap is something you would (I assume, since you're here) never, ever do in your normal life, so your body's response to it has no bearing on what is happening with the rest of your pregnancy (in other words, you're right - it's physiologically irrelevant to you). I happen to think that method is an utterly ridiculous way to test for GD, which is one of the many reasons I refused to even do the 1-hour test. 2.) If you're eating primally, you're already pretty much eating as if you have diabetes, in a sense. So why test for something you're already controlling with diet (especially if the test is designed to induce the condition)?

    If you're concerned or have a family history of GD, get a blood glucose meter and test frequently for a while. Many midwives use this as an effective test for GD.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danielle5690 View Post
    I would refuse the test. That's what I did when I was pregnant.

    There are two factors at work here for you: 1.) Drinking that sugar-loaded crap is something you would (I assume, since you're here) never, ever do in your normal life, so your body's response to it has no bearing on what is happening with the rest of your pregnancy (in other words, you're right - it's physiologically irrelevant to you). I happen to think that method is an utterly ridiculous way to test for GD, which is one of the many reasons I refused to even do the 1-hour test. 2.) If you're eating primally, you're already pretty much eating as if you have diabetes, in a sense. So why test for something you're already controlling with diet (especially if the test is designed to induce the condition)?

    If you're concerned or have a family history of GD, get a blood glucose meter and test frequently for a while. Many midwives use this as an effective test for GD.
    +1

    The 3 hr test made me so sick too - a sugar bomb like that is no good. Testing your glucose is the way to go. Tell the doc, lets assume I failed the test, now what? They have you keep an eye on your actual blood glucose and then add meds/insulin if you can't maintain. If your glucose is a little high post meal, then take a 20-40min walk and test again. Unless you are way out of control, a good diet and moderate exercise after a meal should keep you healthy. At least this is what I've seen for friends w/ GD.

  5. #5
    interzone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
    Thank you so much for this! I saw another Wolf article about Using HbA1C instead of OGTT and found it very informative as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Danielle5690 View Post
    I would refuse the test. That's what I did when I was pregnant.

    There are two factors at work here for you: 1.) Drinking that sugar-loaded crap is something you would (I assume, since you're here) never, ever do in your normal life, so your body's response to it has no bearing on what is happening with the rest of your pregnancy (in other words, you're right - it's physiologically irrelevant to you). I happen to think that method is an utterly ridiculous way to test for GD, which is one of the many reasons I refused to even do the 1-hour test. 2.) If you're eating primally, you're already pretty much eating as if you have diabetes, in a sense. So why test for something you're already controlling with diet (especially if the test is designed to induce the condition)?

    If you're concerned or have a family history of GD, get a blood glucose meter and test frequently for a while. Many midwives use this as an effective test for GD.
    No family history of GD or Type II despite many overweight/obese relatives eating SAD. I did forget to mention that I'm having di/di twins, so there are 2 placentas pumping out hormones and competing with me for fuel.

    I agree with you and Mud Flinger that testing my own glucose is probably the best way to go. If my regular diet is keeping my serum glucose low enough I don't see a need for any other intervention or for making me take a bolus of glucose that is larger than the total sugars I eat in 2-3 days.

    Thanks guys!

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    The GTT is not reliable unless you eat at least 150g carbs for 3 days prior to the test. I did the test about 6 years ago and had no problems at all with either the test or immediately returning to my low-carb level. It was negative for diabetes.

    My current endo relies on my A1C to monitor my blood glucose.

    It's critical to know whether or not you have gestational diabetes, so you should ask the doctor whether the A1C would be adequate to determine that. If not, I'd advise you to take the GTT.

    For me, the health of my child would be paramount, and if you have gest. diabetes, it's critical for the doctor to know.

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    interzone's Avatar
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    Exclamation Update!

    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    This thread is nearly a month old, but I thought I would update it for any other Primal Preggos who might be in a similar situation.

    My OB told me that my only options were to either do finger sticks every day after every meal (basically treating me like I have GD) or to take my chances with the 3 hour glucose tolerance test (OGTT). I opted to do the OGTT at 28 weeks and did 3 days of carb-loading prior to the test. Most of them were PB-approved carbs like white rice, fruit, and potatoes. I did drink a couple of non-diet sodas for the concentrated sugar and good heavens were they ever nasty. I don't know how I ever drank that junk before!

    I got my results back yesterday and here they are (in mg/dL):
    Fasting: 63 (normal <106)
    1 hour: 76 (normal <191)
    2 hour: 73 (normal <166)
    3 hour: 85 (normal <146)

    No sign of GD which is good, and I was amazed by how low my numbers were. I attribute this to 80% PB and would like to thank Mark and all of you for giving the tools, information, and advice that have helped me live a much healthier lifestyle.

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