Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Cardivascular disease and life expactancy rate's page

  1. #1
    MvEssen's Avatar
    MvEssen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Utrecht, Netherlands
    Posts
    256

    Cardivascular disease and life expactancy rate's

    Shop Now
    I'm just searching around on the internet for some information about health and I was wondering.

    Life expactancy since 1900 has increased with huge amounts (almost 40 years).
    Cardiovascular disease has been dropping quite a bit since around 1970.

    Does anyone know the reasons for these good things?

  2. #2
    DeeDub's Avatar
    DeeDub is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    444
    In Medieval Britain, life expectancy at birth was 30 - life expectancy at age 21 was a surprisingly high 64. By the 16th century, for the non-peasant class, that was up to a very modern-looking 71.

    Basically, the really big change is that we've gotten much better at keeping kids from dying, and poor people from starving.

  3. #3
    DeeDub's Avatar
    DeeDub is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    444
    That has some pretty interesting social policy ramifications. It kinda implies we are wasting a lot of money on health care for people who have achieved adulthood, as we're not really accomplishing a whole lot more than the old Leechers and Bleeders and Potioners accomplished.

    Alternately, it could be looked at as adult health care is what enables immensely unhealthy lifestyles to not kill us sooner.

    Either way, it's a sobering thought.

  4. #4
    Dig62's Avatar
    Dig62 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    98
    It is true that cardiovascular deaths specifically have dropped 69% since 1963, even adjusting for age... however I think most of us can agree that it probably doesn't have much to do with diet. As a whole we're eating more junkfood than ever. I think it's likely more due to better and quicker intervention.

    2010 NHLBI Fact Book, Chapter 4, Disease Statistics

  5. #5
    choppedliver's Avatar
    choppedliver is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    111
    The short answer is that immunization, vaccines, and improvements in infant care have basically elminated routine deaths that were widespread in medieval Europe. The higher infant mortality rate basically cuts the life expactancy in half.

    So just because we have higher expectancy now doesn't necessarily mean we're living longer than the average medieval European who made it past 40. What also factors in is lower death rates from accidents, falls, duels, traumas, etc. All those incidents have been reduced because of improvements in safety standards in recent years (except for traffic deaths).

    It's not apples to apples. Also factor in that many people check into nursing homes before expiring, which may lengthen their lives but should not count as their "useful life." In medieval Europe, people just died, or were left to die with very little terminal, hospice care. We have everything from liver and kidney transplants to dialysis and angioplasty.

  6. #6
    paleo-bunny's Avatar
    paleo-bunny is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    SW England, UK
    Posts
    2,667
    Quote Originally Posted by choppedliver View Post

    ...So just because we have higher expectancy now doesn't necessarily mean we're living longer than the average medieval European who made it past 40. What also factors in is lower death rates from accidents, falls, duels, traumas, etc. All those incidents have been reduced because of improvements in safety standards in recent years (except for traffic deaths).

    It's not apples to apples. Also factor in that many people check into nursing homes before expiring, which may lengthen their lives but should not count as their "useful life." In medieval Europe, people just died, or were left to die with very little terminal, hospice care. We have everything from liver and kidney transplants to dialysis and angioplasty.
    This seems to be true. I study art history as a hobby and it's very noticable that the majority of great artists going all the way back to the 14th century lived to an average age of 80 - the rest mostly died of venereal disease or suicide in their 20s or 30s. During the 20th century the pattern is similar with the average life expectancy perhaps 5-10 years longer. Generally great artists are much longer lived than average - I think that's something to do with the benefit of appreciation of nature and being creative. Bear in mind that artists were generally quite poor up until the 20th century.

    I think it's a valid occupation for comparison as the lifestyle hasn't changed much over the centuries. Bear in mind that a much higher proportion of employment was hard manual labour up until the 20th century, and this was a factor in shortening lifespan.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

  7. #7
    DeeDub's Avatar
    DeeDub is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    444
    I suspect it's the other way around - the longer you live, the better your chances of becoming a great artist, as you get to improve/expand your skills for longer, develop more experiences to draw on, produce a larger body of work, and, frankly, have more time to properly market yourself.
    Last edited by DeeDub; 01-15-2012 at 12:46 PM.

  8. #8
    paleo-bunny's Avatar
    paleo-bunny is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    SW England, UK
    Posts
    2,667
    Quote Originally Posted by DeeDub View Post
    I suspect it's the other way around - the longer you live, the better your chances of becoming a great artist, as you get to both improve/expand your skills for longer, develop more experiences to draw on, can produce a larger body of work, and, frankly, have more time to properly market yourself.
    Not at all. Most of the greats became recognised as such during their twenties or thirties and got the commissions to prove it.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

  9. #9
    peril's Avatar
    peril is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    2,679
    Back on topic

    The age-adjusted mortality rate from CVD has definitely fallen as our diets have deteriorated, but they're not related. Indeed, rates of CVD diagnosis have increased dramatically and in many parts of the world CVD is the number one or two killer. We have simply improved our acute care. I managed to have a significant heart attack and had five stents emplaced in two lesions in two visits to the cath lab, yet only had four days off work. That is a credit to modern medicine. Pity that their chronic care of CVD sucks completely
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

  10. #10
    MvEssen's Avatar
    MvEssen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Utrecht, Netherlands
    Posts
    256
    You guys are awesome, all makes a lot of sense.

    I geuss there's no way of finding out the (succesful) operation rate on cardiovascular disease?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •