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Thread: Dehydrated Onion vs Fresh Chopped Onion page

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    Dehydrated Onion vs Fresh Chopped Onion

    Primal Fuel
    Does dehydrated onion measure the same as fresh chopped onion when making, say, a Meatloaf?

  2. #2
    bloodorchid's Avatar
    bloodorchid is offline Senior Member
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    no, a tsp of dehydrated onion will net more than a tsp of fresh

    but i suppose it all evens out because you get more flavor with fresh
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    DruidQueen's Avatar
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    Rehydrate your onions first. Measure out about 2/3 of what the recipe calls for, put it in a coffee cup with hot water and stick it in the microwave for ~90 seconds or so. Let it sit about 5-10 minutes and then measure it. If you need some more, rehydrate a bit more.

    There may be better ways to do this, but this works for me/my family. Good luck with the meatloaf.

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    I hadn't thought about the need to rehydrate the onions first. I figured the juices in the meatloaf would take care of that. I will rehydrate them first so I won't have little onion chips to crunch on.

    When I was shopping I could only find Onion Granules; that's not the same thing so I didn't buy them. Wal Mart probably has them.

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    DruidQueen's Avatar
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    WalMart or Sam's Club has them, the brand they carry where I'm at is Tone's. The link has a picture of what the container looks like.

    Tone's Minced Onion - 15 oz shaker: Amazon.com: Grocery & Gourmet Food

    If there are oils or salt in the liquid you're going to rehydrate with, it significantly slows the rehydration time down, sometimes it won't rehydrate at all. I play with my dehydrator all the time for cooking with dried stuff. If you're making a gumbo, say, and are using dehydrated okra in it, you can let it rehydrate in the pot or rehydrate it seperately. Personally, I let that rehydrate in the pot as I prefer for my okra to not be super mushy. For stuff like onions though, I'd definetly use straight water on it seperate.

  6. #6
    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DruidQueen View Post
    WalMart or Sam's Club has them, the brand they carry where I'm at is Tone's. The link has a picture of what the container looks like.

    Tone's Minced Onion - 15 oz shaker: Amazon.com: Grocery & Gourmet Food

    If there are oils or salt in the liquid you're going to rehydrate with, it significantly slows the rehydration time down, sometimes it won't rehydrate at all. I play with my dehydrator all the time for cooking with dried stuff. If you're making a gumbo, say, and are using dehydrated okra in it, you can let it rehydrate in the pot or rehydrate it seperately. Personally, I let that rehydrate in the pot as I prefer for my okra to not be super mushy. For stuff like onions though, I'd definetly use straight water on it seperate.
    I'll check at Wal Mart. Actually, the reason I was going to use dehydrated onions instead of just chopping some was as a filler instead of bread crumbs. I've noticed meatloaf made with some kind of filler like crushed pork rinds, chopped or pureed vegetables or cheese seems to keep the texture of the meatloaf a little looser and tender. Meatloaf that doesn't have some sort of filler seem more dense.

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    DruidQueen's Avatar
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    Hmm, sounds like a good idea. I've never used any fillers in meatloaf, never thought about it. But I'm sure you could add in some dehydrated mushrooms, bell pepper flakes and garlic as well. I usually just have those in the gravy/juice that cooks out of it in the crock pot. We use deer ground meat for most stuff, so we're usually trying to get it to stick together, not make it looser.

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    Unamused Mouse's Avatar
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    Onion flour. Huh. I think you might be on to something.

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