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Thread: Olives, Anyone? page 2

  1. #11
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel


    High, high sodium due to the typical brining......not that that stops me.


  2. #12
    Tarlach's Avatar
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    Aren't all olives processed (and otherwise inedible)?


    That meant Grok didn't eat them so they could only fall into the loose 20% part of PB.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  3. #13
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    if curing in salt (brine) is 'processing'. which would make salt-cured jerky part of the 20% as well.


  4. #14
    Tarlach's Avatar
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    I doubt Grok salt brined beef. But the two things aren't the same.


    Grok ate unsalted meat, so that is paleo food + salt. Salt would be in the 20%

    Olives are not paleo as Grok wouldn't have eaten them.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  5. #15
    FlyNavyWife's Avatar
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    I'm more interested in eating "real foods" that our bodies can use to our advantage (versus foods like wheat which act to our detriment) than in eating what Grok would have ACTUALLY eaten out there in the wilderness.


    Olives are fair game in my book. yum yum.

    Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

  6. #16
    fbw's Avatar
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    since olives grow near sea water, it is possible the brining came about because some grok found fallen olives in salt water and ate them and found them good. in fact, it is pretty plausible. just like it was a while before grok cooked food, pastoral food production (which olives are a borderline case of, rather than agricultural) was one of those grey areas where grok transitioned to herding and tending fruit and gardens and then on to the partial horrors of agriculture...


    pastoral food seems reasonably primal, which olives are.


  7. #17
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    I'm with FNW on the logic of eating real food, not necessarily exactly what Grok would have consumed.


    (For me, the rationale behind this lifestyle is based on science, not evolution...which is, like creation, a THEORY, peeps -- let's see you reproduce it.)


    Besides, no individual Grok would have eaten the entire spectrum of foods we consider paleo/primal. Arctic Grok never saw a papaya, and Equator Grok never chewed on a seal. Does that mean we, their descendants, can't digest both foods now that transportation technology makes them available to us? Obviously not.


    Please pass the olives.

    Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

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  8. #18
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    That's a stretch, fbw. A long one.


    Not that an olive tree may not have grown next to the Adriatic or something, but even if it did, sea water is no where near strong enough to brine. And then, what would prevent said olives from just washing away? And then Grok would have to make the connection with salt (whazzthat?) to preservation.


    I don't recall any mention of olive preservation in the bible. Probably because they didn't have salt. They sure did use the oil, though. I've seen an olive press ground into rock several thousand years old.


    Not likely.


  9. #19
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    @OTB -- Eh? Salt is mentioned in the Old Testament, including in some early books (like Leviticus), as a seasoning, disinfectant, and offering.


    ...and you could always take a bite of Lot's wife...

    Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

    Latest post: Stop Being Stupid

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