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Thread: food to bring on ski trips page

  1. #1
    Shazkar's Avatar
    Shazkar is offline Junior Member
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    what kind of things would you suggest bringing on a day ski trip, that takes little preparation and would be good fuel for snowboarding? because out of laziness i've been buying sandwiches at 5AM and taking them with me but i would like to move away from that


    so i'm open to ideas


    buying chili at the lodges is way too expensive


    also, what if you were going on a 3 day trip and didn't have a fridge, kitchen, or car to buy things, what might you take to limit the amount you needed to buy out?


  2. #2
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    Are you talking resort skiing or backcountry (if I'm at a resort I like to try and eat on the lifts to maximize my shreddin' time)?

    For backcountry: I usually bring a little plastic tupperware dish with some chicken salad or tuna salad, a couple packets of almond butter, and a piece of fruit or two. I also have a few Kind bars and Larabars on hand just in case I end up spending more time out there than I plan ... though these things are painful to eat when cold so if I'm going to eat one I usually throw it in an inside pocket for 15 minutes so my body heat can soften it a bit.

    For resorts: cabbage wraps ... they're like a sandwich, but the meat/cheese is wrapped in a cabbage leaf instead of bread. You can eat these on the lift depending on how long of a lift ride it is. Also clementines (those little oranges that peel really easy) are good too.

    That's about all I got ... if it's a powder day and I don't have food I'll usually end up doing an impromptu IF so I can maximize time on the slopes


    As to the second question, if it's a ski-mountaineering trip, you wouldn't need a fridge ... I've found that things like butter and cheese keep pretty well for a few days in a moderately cold environment.

    Subduction leads to orogeny

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  3. #3
    LX's Avatar
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    In addition to what AmyMac suggested I'd recommend beef jerky. Hardboiled eggs are good too but they can get pretty well mushed if you fall on them.


    A hard cheese ought to be okay sitting on a counter for three days. Keep it in a ziploc baggie or wrapped so it doesn't get a rind.


    I'd get fruit or veggies you can eat raw with minimal preparation (summer squash, avacado, apples, salad fixns etc). Maybe not so good for the trail but might do for a breakfast or dinner.


  4. #4
    gazb's Avatar
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    It's just a day trip? Just eat a good big breakfast and you'll be set. I never feel the need for food when I'm snowboarding. Snowboarding's aerobic activity so burns fat not carbohydrate, so eat plenty fat (although even the leanest person should have more than enough stored fat for fuel if needed!). I was in the French alps a few weeks ago and every morning I just ate all the eggs, ham, salami, and butter I could get my hands on, and skipped the baguettes, pains au chocolat, croissants, and fruit juices. Pretty much zero carb because carbs just make me hungry again in a few hours. I saved my carb eating for the evening meals . Did the trick.


    All the skiers I know eat tons of sugary junk. I'm not sure whether this is out of flawed "carbs = energy" beliefs or because skiing (as opposed to boarding) works the anaerobic system with all the pulling yourself along with poles etc..


  5. #5
    AmyMac703's Avatar
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    @gazb ...

    I've also found that most people I know who are into outdoor sports (skiing/snowboarding, climbing, etc) eat virtually nothing but crap while engaging in these activities.

    I think part of it is because of the apparent convenience of crap foods (i.e. bagels don't get squished in your backpack the way hard boiled eggs might), but a big part of it is because of the "carbs = energy" illusion.

    I'll sometimes eat more carbs when I'm playing outside depending on the activity, but I make darn sure they're good carbs (i.e. apples, oranges, etc).

    Subduction leads to orogeny

    My blog that I don't update as often as I should: http://primalclimber.blogspot.com/

  6. #6
    Shazkar's Avatar
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    First, thanks for the advice


    Mostly these are day trips, but in the upcoming weeks I am going on 3 weekend overnight trips ( assuming my knee heals from this past Friday >.< )


    However, for day trips even, often I&#39;ll eat some bacon and several eggs early in the morning and be starving by lunch time. I can&#39;t do the whole skip lunch deal.


    Anyway, I try to bring almonds with me as a snack, that&#39;s certainly helpful... I need more meat jerky, that would probably go a long way


    However, on these longer overnights, essentially we will be leaving at 3AM on Friday, and returning to campus late Sunday night... and this is a bus trip, where we stay at motels, so my options are extremely limited... any suggestions for that kind of a trip? Perhaps canned tuna?


  7. #7
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    jerky, pemmican, smoked fish, canned fish (salmon, anchovies, herring, sardines), shredded coconut flakes, macadamia/almond/walnuts, berries, big plastic container of spinach, olives, red onions, hardboiled eggs, pre-cooked bacon, cottage cheese (if you tolerate dairy), coconut milk...


  8. #8
    John R's Avatar
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    I usually go with good jerky and shelled pistachios or cashew pieces -- lightweight, salty, hard to mess up if you fall on &#39;em.


    (My son says, "dried cranberries!" I normally avoid dried fruit myself, but I might bring a little on a heavy-exertion day like a ski trip.)


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