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Thread: So there's this whole duck thawing in my fridge... page

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    Greensprout's Avatar
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    So there's this whole duck thawing in my fridge...

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    I picked it up on sale frozen a few months ago. I've never cooked a duck. I recall a few threads or maybe even a MDA blog post about duck over the past year that I'll do a search for. Any suggestions for what has worked for you? Crispy roasted? Going out on a limb and doing a confit?

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    Roasted all the way. I used to have ducks so they were a fairly common dinner item. I had the best success when I lightly scored the thickest areas of the skin, however my guys were leaner than store bought duck so I didn't do much of this. Duck really needs to be well up from the pan because of the amount of fat that will render out. I like to use solid root veggies as an oven rack, so the duck would be up on onion halves, big chunks of turnip, potato halves, that kind of thing. Added bonus is tasty veggies!
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    Roasted and stuffed with a mixture of granny smith apples, onion, celery, and pork sausage. Cook the sausage first of course. You can do a bit of orange juice and honey as a basting glaze too.
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    Is it really whole? Do you need to remove the intestines first?


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    Quote Originally Posted by Knifegill View Post
    Is it really whole? Do you need to remove the intestines first?
    Ha, perhaps I should clarify...frozen in a package, whole minus head, and though I've not opened the plastic yet, I can only assume also without feathers and guts! Might include giblets, however...

    The ideas for roasting sound great, still sorting out the details of what I'll do. I think this will be dinner tomorrow. I like the idea of veggies roasted in the fat underneath, and am hoping to collect some extra fat as well.

    Anyone else have any other great ideas for duck?

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    I did this for Christmas. It was divine.
    The Best Way to Roast a Duck (Hello, Crispy Skin!) | The Hungry Mouse

    I saved the duck fat. It's so good for cooking.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I did this for Christmas. It was divine.
    The Best Way to Roast a Duck (Hello, Crispy Skin!) | The Hungry Mouse

    I saved the duck fat. It's so good for cooking.
    Thanks!! The step by step tutorial is great.

    Definitely planning to save the fat.

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    Crispy roasted. 3.5 hours at 300*F rotating once every hour. I made a duck on Monday.



    Sooo good.
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    I took mine and steamed it on a standing chicken roaster for an hour. I spiced mine with Chinese 5 spice, ginger and a few other ingredients. Basically a Peking duck recipe. Then removed it from the pot. I took a fork and poked the skin all over. Then add a few seasonings and stuck it in the oven to roast. The skin got really crispy. It was so good.

    It was our first whole duck. The kids were concerned about eating the duck. They ended up loving it. Now, they ask for it. Well, I told them once in a while.

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    I always roast a duck the same way - boring, I know, but it always comes out delicious. I pierce the skin through the fat but trying not to pierce the flesh - or the juices run out. Pierce all over - and underneath too. Rub with sea salt. Take a deep roasting tin and put the bird on a rack in the tin, roast as high as the oven will go for 20 minutes. Now turn the oven down to 160 C (320 F) and tip about a cup of boiling water into the roasting tin (this is to stop the juice that come out buying under the hot fat). Cook for around 2.5 - 3 hours, until pulling a wing / leg shows that it it will pull away easily. (Keep topping up with water - you don't want the juices to burn).

    Tip the fat and juices into a pan, spoon off the fat (keep it - divine for cooking) and make gravy with the juices left in the pan.

    The bones / giblets make a wonderful stock.

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