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Thread: New Study Credibility page

  1. #1
    cmac's Avatar
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    New Study Credibility

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    http://www.canada.com/health/Brain%2Bsc ... story.html

    Curious whether or not any of you have seen this and if so, whether or not you were privy to the types of fats fed to the rats. A freind of mine sent it to me. I have been trying to convince her not to fear fat...the right types of fat anyway and wanted to know if there was anyone who might be able to shed some light on this. If it clarified they were feeding them high amounts of Omega-6 fats, it would explain the inflammation and scarring observed, but it is pretty vague.

    Any insight would be appreciated.

    Thanks!

    cmac

  2. #2
    MikkiB's Avatar
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    The link doesn't work for me...

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    cmac's Avatar
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    oops...sorry about that. Try this...

    Brain scarring may help explain obesity battle

    Thanks!

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    I would love to know the precise ingredients of that chow. Not only would I be curious as to the types of fatty acids, I would like to know the sugar content. I was listening to a lecture by Dr. Lustig a few months ago and he said one of the confounding issues in many studies of high fat diets was that they had to add sugar to the feed, often as much as 20% of the diet, to get animals to overeat.

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    Owly's Avatar
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    If it's like the high-fat chow used in other rat studies, it uses high-O6 vegetable oils that are already known to be damaging.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

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    Also, rats are not humans and have different nutritional needs.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    Also, rats are not humans and have different nutritional needs.
    This is what I came in here to say. Rat studies prove practically nothing.

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    It all sounds like a "It's not our fault we're fat" excuse.
    There are two wolves fighting within a man's heart, one is Love, the other is Hate. The one that wins is the one you feed.

    My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we'll change the world. - Jack Layton

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  9. #9
    cmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    If it's like the high-fat chow used in other rat studies, it uses high-O6 vegetable oils that are already known to be damaging.
    My thoughts exactly! Just curious if there was someone who might have more insight into the "high Fat, more palatable" diet...

  10. #10
    cmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaisyEater View Post
    I would love to know the precise ingredients of that chow. Not only would I be curious as to the types of fatty acids, I would like to know the sugar content. I was listening to a lecture by Dr. Lustig a few months ago and he said one of the confounding issues in many studies of high fat diets was that they had to add sugar to the feed, often as much as 20% of the diet, to get animals to overeat.
    Yeah..."high-fat and highly palatable chow" makes me wonder what was in it in addition to the mysterious high fats that made it palatable...

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