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Thread: Almond flour pasta? page 3

  1. #21
    Artyfact's Avatar
    Artyfact is offline Junior Member
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    A little late, but yes...it is delicious and nutritious

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    Quote Originally Posted by zbg935 View Post
    Has anyone ever tried making pasta out of almond flour? You could top with meat sauce for protein.
    I noticed your post when looking for recipes myself. I have done it twice now, with some quantitative adjustments to the second batch. Current recipe as follows:

    500g raw almond flour
    250 grams tapioca flour
    1 tblspoon xantham gum
    8 beaten eggs

    Knead the whole lot together, roll it out thin as possible, slice into tagliatelle or lasagne sheets and hang out to dry.

    Boil for 5-10 minutes to cook.

    That's a big batch by the way, so halve the amounts depending on how many mouths you have to feed! It can be kept in the fridge for weeks though, or frozen forever.

    I hope the original poster sees this. If I were him/her I'd welcome an actual response to my question, rather than a raft of ill-informed and judgemental opinions relating to the nutritional value of almond flour, or why I should just try and forget about pasta (I refer largely to the first page of replies, and not to any of the useful or inquisitive replies that followed). The alternatives I've tried are all nice and tasty, but this is actually like pasta. It has a beautiful nutty aroma, an 'al dente' texture, and only a fraction of the carbs found in other pastas. Good luck, and diet for your health and pleasure, not to be part of an extremist club.
    Last edited by Artyfact; 01-10-2013 at 02:30 PM.

  2. #22
    j34k25ozug's Avatar
    j34k25ozug is offline Junior Member
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    Hey zbg935! I have some great recipes to make your own pasta with almond flour and coconut flour. Very simple recipes just using flour, eggs and seasoning. Don't listen to these other people telling you not to eat it. Almond flour and coconut flour are healthy in moderation. My recipes are awesome. I have made my own sweet potato gnocchi, spaghetti and ravioli, and have a recipe for making ricotta cheese out of macademia nuts (dairy free). If you want pasta, you should have it! Check out my blog keepcalmandpaleoon.blogspot.com for some recipes! Hope this helps :-)

  3. #23
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artyfact View Post
    I noticed your post when looking for recipes myself. I have done it twice now, with some quantitative adjustments to the second batch. Current recipe as follows:

    500g raw almond flour
    250 grams tapioca flour
    1 tblspoon xantham gum
    8 beaten eggs

    Knead the whole lot together, roll it out thin as possible, slice into tagliatelle or lasagne sheets and hang out to dry.

    Boil for 5-10 minutes to cook.

    That's a big batch by the way, so halve the amounts depending on how many mouths you have to feed! It can be kept in the fridge for weeks though, or frozen forever.

    I hope the original poster sees this. If I were him/her I'd welcome an actual response to my question, rather than a raft of ill-informed and judgemental opinions relating to the nutritional value of almond flour, or why I should just try and forget about pasta (I refer largely to the first page of replies, and not to any of the useful or inquisitive replies that followed). The alternatives I've tried are all nice and tasty, but this is actually like pasta. It has a beautiful nutty aroma, an 'al dente' texture, and only a fraction of the carbs found in other pastas. Good luck, and diet for your health and pleasure, not to be part of an extremist club.
    Xanthan gum is an easy thing to add to gluten-free substitute foods, because it give handling properties that are similar in some ways. However, lots of people are sensitive to it, especially those who are already sensitive to gluten. This recipe uses quite a large quantity, relatively speaking, which would cause me multiple symptoms, not to mention that with that much xanthan gum the eater would have to ignore the slimy mouth feel it gives everything.

  4. #24
    Artyfact's Avatar
    Artyfact is offline Junior Member
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    No worries gum wise

    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    Xanthan gum is an easy thing to add to gluten-free substitute foods, because it give handling properties that are similar in some ways. However, lots of people are sensitive to it, especially those who are already sensitive to gluten. This recipe uses quite a large quantity, relatively speaking, which would cause me multiple symptoms, not to mention that with that much xanthan gum the eater would have to ignore the slimy mouth feel it gives everything.
    I've tried this without the gum and it still works, with a little more effort on getting it all to stick together. However, it's worth noting that it definitely doesn't impart any slimy texture when used in this recipe. The pasta is solid. A sauce with Xantham often has an unappealing texture, but that's because it's sauce! As I mentioned, the pasta has an al dente texture, like guess what....PASTA! If you're not sensitive to it medically speaking you won't notice it. I'd recommend and welcome criticism from the point of view of experience rather than speculation, since the word slimy might put off inquisitive minds who may otherwise have tried the recipe and enjoyed as much as I do on a regular basis. I can now eat pasta (and all the wonderful sauces that go with it) with the rest of my family and friends, regardless of whether they're on the same diet as me.

  5. #25
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    s-piper is offline Senior Member
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    You could do it I guess, although it sounds like a hassle.
    Personally, I like kelp noodles as a replacement for pasta. Yes, the texture is crunchy and all the cooking in the world won't make them soft, but an acid will so really they're perfect for marinara sauce.

    Spaghetti squash is okay too.

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