Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Mountain Biking and Kayaking page

  1. #1
    Moose's Avatar
    Moose is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    18

    1

    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    Im looking to incorporate mountain biking (more specifically cross country/trail riding) and kayaking into my life. The kayaking will be much less frequent, but the cycling I want to do more often.


    Any experienced members of those sports have any tips for beginners. Both general tips for the sports and tips on incorporate them into a primal lifestyle.


  2. #2
    jpippenger's Avatar
    jpippenger Guest

    1



    Not exactly an expert, but I would say don't skimp on the bike and learn how to do basic maintenance on it. I.E., changing a flat, straightening a bent rim, etc...


  3. #3
    grandma's Avatar
    grandma is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    64

    1



    I've done a fair amount for Mtn Biking. Generally, I would start easy -- look for fire roads or well worn trails. Once you get more confident you will start to look for more technical (rocky) and single track (narrow trails) it's a lot of fun. I would recommend being careful with down hills. The tend to be washed out and rocky, it's pretty easy to go over the handle bars, so go slow until you get comfortable and learn how to handle that.


    Gear:


    Bike: I have not paid attention to the latest -- But I have always liked Specialized bikes.


    Pedals: I think opinions vary on this one, but I feel much more comfortable and confident with my feet clipped into clip-less (SPD) pedals. Others worry about not being get out, but for me I feel more connected to the bike.


    Bar ends: I like to have them so that you can use your arms on the uphills.


    Hydration: use a camel back or similar -- it's not easy to get at a bottle on the go when you are bouncing around.


    Helmet: Duh! Rocks, trees etc are hard.


    Regarding primal: Mtn Biking is all about the sprint -- you can move a long at an easy pace until you have to get up rocky hill, then you need to grit your teeth and push. As you learn you won't make it up that hill, but each time you will get farther and it's all about the personal best. Mtn Bikers are cool like that.


    Not sure what else you are looking for.

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  4. #4
    bruce.b's Avatar
    bruce.b is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    32

    1



    I've done a ton of mountain biking, starting in 1983. Like Mark did with his running, I did it to excess. I raced cross country for years and did very well but mostly rode for fun. I'm now doing a much more balanced exercise program following the general exercise rules Mark explained in The Primal Blueprint.


    I still love riding. I ride a 29er singlespeed, rigid mountain bike with pinned BMX platform pedals and wear thin soled sneakers. No suspension and no clipless pedals. Why? I find it much more fun and satisfying this way. I think it's also much healthier. On a singlespeed mountain bike you're essentially doing intense intervals with lots of easy aerobic efforts between them. It's much less about the bicycle and technology and more about your skills and fitness. It's about maintaining momentum and flow. It's more primal, stripped of all unnecessary technology. It's feels a lot more like riding did when you were a kid. It's more about fun and play. It's a healthier workout and it fits in better with the primal philosophy of this website.


    I've been riding offroad singlespeed for something like ten years. At first it's going to seem really hard, but it gets a lot easier. I just started trail running so I'm still working on fitting this all together. I do a lot of hiking, bicycling and now trail running and trying to keep it within the context of the primal exercise rules. I also do running sprints and on my weight training days I do kettlebells and bodyweight exercises. Seems like more than it feels like.


    bruce b.


  5. #5
    AmyMac703's Avatar
    AmyMac703 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Northern Idaho
    Posts
    461

    1



    I usually go kayaking about two to four times per season.

    Are you meaning whitewater or sea kayaking? I've only done whitewater.

    The best tip I can give is that it's pretty imperative that you get your roll down before you try anything serious (Class III or higher for whitewater). Also, keep in mind that rolling in moving water is a whole different ball game than rolling in still water. Some boats will be easier than others -- creek boats are easier cuz they have a nice rounded hull.

    Have you kayaked before at all?

    Subduction leads to orogeny

    My blog that I don't update as often as I should: http://primalclimber.blogspot.com/

  6. #6
    grandma's Avatar
    grandma is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    64

    1



    bruce I've never tried a single speed or a 29. I'd like too. My Stumpjumper is from the early 90s and those concepts didn't exist back then. I disagree on the bmx pedals. I've tried both and much prefer the spds. I find that using the up stroke can be helpful when cruising and I find that on descents I feel connected to the bike and can surf around rocks when I am connected. Not to mention bunny hopping over and around things. To each his own.

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  7. #7
    bruce.b's Avatar
    bruce.b is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    32

    1



    Granny,

    It took me a while to get totally comfortable with pinned BMX flats. A big reason for me is I've hated stiff soled shoes my whole life. I love riding in flexible, thin soled sneakers. I also like being able to move around on the pedals and not be stuck in one position. I like it for all the reasons I like VFF's for hiking, trail running and working out. It's also somewhat of a singlespeed thing, a big part of going SS is to get rid of all unneeded technology and make the bike as simple, light and reliable as possible. It's also really nice to be able to instantly hop on and off the bike which you do a lot more of SS. It eliminates the possibility of going down and getting injured if you don't get unclipped, something I've seen happen many times.


    It's like all this stuff, you just have to discover what works for you.


    bruce b.


  8. #8
    grandma's Avatar
    grandma is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    64

    1



    bruce,


    I've probably fallen due to not being able to unclip about as many times as I have the bmx pedals bloody my shins. The falls tend to happen at low speeds when things slow down too quickly, while the shins happen at high speeds when things get a little off balance. Anyway I'm intrigued by the SS, might have to look at one.

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  9. #9
    jostle's Avatar
    jostle is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    110

    1



    Mtbing and kayaking are awesome for fun workouts. I try and get a lunch mtb ride in once a week. I would suggest going into a local bike shop and trying out a couple bikes, since everyone has a diff body/riding style. Make sure when you test the bikes out to ride off curbs, some quick stops, hops, and accelerating in and out of the saddle. Some of the bike shops around here actually have wooded trails to do test rides, which would be the best situation. I ride a Gary Fisher and recommend the bikes to a lot of new riders due to the geometry of the frame making it feel more comfortable on steep inclines/declines. I would suggest to start off with just the pedals and once your more comfortable with the bike you can graduate up to cages or a clip in system.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •