Page 387 of 415 FirstFirst ... 287337377385386387388389397 ... LastLast
Results 3,861 to 3,870 of 4146

Thread: Iodine Anyone? page 387

  1. #3861
    Owly's Avatar
    Owly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,823
    Shop Now
    [QUOTE=Paysan;911880]
    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    There's actually quite a bit of research (and I mean real scientific research, not forum posts or random websites) that illustrates significant risks from chronically elevated iodine doses. While iodine deficiency is not good either, it's a case where while some is beneficial, more is not necessarily so. I'm concerned when people say things like "well, I take a lot of it and feel fine" because long-term toxicity can take a while to emerge.

    I'm not telling people they shouldn't take iodine--I realize that there are reasons to supplement, and I've read some compelling evidence in credible journals for moderate supplementation particularly for those who don't use iodized salt or consume seafood/seaweed regularly. But it is vitally important to be aware that taking too much of something beneficial can become harmful. Long-term high doses of iodine may cause significant and potentially irreversible health problems, including permanent damage to the thyroid. endquote

    OK, I've only checked a couple of those quoted; so if my conclusions are offbase, point me again. However, the 2nd source listed compared kids of various ages from 5 continents including Japan. After going through the blahblah, I have some reservations with their conclusions. Quote: Conclusions: Chronic iodine intakes approximately twice those recommended—indicated by UI concentrations in the range of 300–500 μg/L—do not increase Tvol in children. However, UI concentrations ≥500 μg/L are associated with increasing Tvol, which reflects the adverse effects of chronic iodine excess.Endquote:

    OK, fine, but where are the goiter statistics? Supposedly high thyroid induces goiters. It is my understanding that LOW thyroid actions produce goiters. All I read is that they tested, arrived at a figure, and tell us to believe them. Surely the Japanese kids should have had the highest ratios and chronic iodine poisoning. That's not what they said. And the first quoted source had this to say: Quote:
    All animal species appear to have a wide margin of safety for excess I consumption. Dietary I levels of 500 to 1000 times the minimal dietary required level are generally well tolerated in rats, pigs, chickens, and ruminant animals (10). Among the species studied, horses seem to be most susceptible to I toxicity. Chronic consumption of diets with high levels of I, for example, kelp consumption by horses, markedly reduces organic binding of I by the thyroid gland, resulting in goiter in the offspring of mares (10).

    Studies by Arrington et al. (13, 14), Ammerman et al. (15), Wilgus et al. (16), and Newton and Clawson (17) in rabbits, hamsters, rats, pigs, and chickens suggest that rats, hamsters, pigs, and chickens can tolerate dietary I levels up to 500 mg/kg, but rabbits experience serious mortality in offspring when 250 mg/kg is fed to the dam in late gestation. Endquote.
    Finally I understand why rabbits aren't fed seaweed. But look at the sheer quantities involved for other animals -500 to 1000 times the RDA. Note that rats nd pigs, our closest animal models , tolerated 500 mg/kg. What? So an 80 kg person under that regime should be able to tolerate (80x500mg)= 4000 mg daily. And NOBODY is getting anywhere near those amounts, AFAIK.
    I'd suggest reading further down the first study to the human toxicity section (Iodine Toxicity and Its Amelioration

    "Well over half of adult I goiter patients have been found to ingest inorganic I for a prolonged period, with daily amounts ranging from 18 mg to 1 g (6). Withdrawal of I in these people usually produces a return to the euthyroid condition, and reintroduction of KI generally causes both goiter and hypothyroidism to reappear within 3 weeks (29, 30). Wolff (6) concluded that the relatively rapid reappearance of goiter after reintroduction of I therapy may be the most conclusive test of whether the goiter was, in fact, caused by excess I ingestion. "

    And:

    "A daily I intake of 10 times (i.e., 1.5 mg/day) the minimum daily adult requirement of 0.15 mg/d may cause I goiter in some people (6)."

    For the study of the Japanese children, please see the discussion section of the full text for a more in-depth explanation (High thyroid volume in children with excess dietary iodine intakes).

    Goiter simply means an enlarged thyroid, which may occur in hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  2. #3862
    Paysan's Avatar
    Paysan is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    247
    Quote Originally Posted by marcadav View Post
    thyroidmanager.org disagrees with your statement:
    The Iodine Deficiency Disorders – Thyroid Disease Manager
    So, what does this say from above source? Quote: t thus appears that IIH can be considered one of the iodine deficiency disorders, and it may be largely unavoidable in the early phase of iodine repletion in iodine deficient populations, particularly in those with moderate to severe iodine deficiency. Its incidence reverts to normal or even below normal after one to ten years of iodine supplementation (196).
    I read that as a lot of iodine all at once in iodine deprived individuals can cause havoc until iodine sufficiency (over 10 years) is obtained. As for the rest of the article, it's mainly talking about autoimmune thyroiditis, with effects occuring mainly in PREVIOUSLY IODINE DEFICIENT subjects. Hmmmm. Then it discusses cancer. And I do understand their overall conclusions: Quote: . The frequency of cytologically diagnosed chronic thyroiditis increased from 1.5 to 5.7% (214). Overall, it appears that correction of iodine deficiency decreases the risk of, and the morbidity from, thyroid cancer.

    Thus, the benefits of correcting iodine deficiency far outweigh its risks (215, 216). Iodine-induced hyperthyroidism and other adverse effects can be almost entirely avoided by adequate and sustained quality assurance and monitoring of iodine supplementation which should also confirm adequate iodine intake. Endquote.

    I guess the only real bone of contention here are the amounts given. (10 years to recover from deficiency and let iodine supplementation settle into acceptable levels??? I'm sorry, but I doubt if I can spare a decade at my age.)

  3. #3863
    Paysan's Avatar
    Paysan is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    247
    Quote Originally Posted by Pamsc View Post
    I haven't looked at all of these, but those I looked at don't leave me overly concerned. Many involve much more dangerous forms of iodine, like amiodarone. Others involve iodine causing (or exacerbating) autoimmune thyroid damage, which we know can happen if you take iodine without selenium. The Peace Corps workers were in Niger, which a quick google search suggests is an area of low selenium.
    Talking about dangerous forms of iodine, look what's happening in Fukashima now: quote:
    Accordingly, how can anyone estimate long term health effects when actual exposure rates are unknown?

    That said, scientists do have a well defined test group – the population of Fukushima Prefecture surrounding the stricken NPP.

    And the sixth report of the Fukushima Prefecture Health Management Survey, which was released in April, revealed after the survey examined 38,114 local children that 36 percent of Fukushima children have abnormal thyroid growths.

    The Fukushima Prefecture Health Management Survey revealed that 13,460 children, or 35.3 percent, had thyroid cysts or nodules up to 0.197 inches long growing on their thyroids and 0.5 percent of the children had growths larger than 0.197 inches. Endquote Radioactive iodine, anyone? from Oilprice.com
    Last edited by Paysan; 07-25-2012 at 05:04 PM. Reason: add'l info

  4. #3864
    Paysan's Avatar
    Paysan is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    247
    [QUOTE=Owly;911897]
    Quote Originally Posted by Paysan View Post

    I'd suggest reading further down the first study to the human toxicity section (Iodine Toxicity and Its Amelioration

    "Well over half of adult I goiter patients have been found to ingest inorganic I for a prolonged period, with daily amounts ranging from 18 mg to 1 g (6). Withdrawal of I in these people usually produces a return to the euthyroid condition, and reintroduction of KI generally causes both goiter and hypothyroidism to reappear within 3 weeks (29, 30). Wolff (6) concluded that the relatively rapid reappearance of goiter after reintroduction of I therapy may be the most conclusive test of whether the goiter was, in fact, caused by excess I ingestion. "

    And:

    "A daily I intake of 10 times (i.e., 1.5 mg/day) the minimum daily adult requirement of 0.15 mg/d may cause I goiter in some people (6)."

    For the study of the Japanese children, please see the discussion section of the full text for a more in-depth explanation (High thyroid volume in children with excess dietary iodine intakes).

    Goiter simply means an enlarged thyroid, which may occur in hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.
    The Wolff-Chaikoff effect was first postulated in 1948. Since then, there have been numerous studies, including this one from Endocrinology 1999, that show the effect is transient. In this article, titled "Escape from Wolff-Chaikoff, here are their conclusions: Quote: Hashimoto’s
    thyroiditis (19).
    In summary, we have shown that excess iodide, given to
    rats, chronically or acutely decreases both thyroid NIS
    mRNA and protein. Our findings are consistent with the
    hypothesis that the escape from the Wolff-Chaikoff effect is
    caused by a down-regulation of the NIS, resulting in decreased
    iodide transport into the thyroid. This would then
    lower the intrathyroidal iodine below a critical threshold and
    would allow organification to resume. The decrease in NIS
    is likely to be, at least in part, transcriptional. In addition, we
    have also found that excess iodide decreases TPOmRNAand
    that this decrease may contribute to iodide-induced hypothyroidism
    commonly seen in patients with Hashimotos’s
    thyroiditis. Endquote

    I dunno, seems like the hypothesis doesn't stand up to experimentation, and that the rats would have recovered in 6 days even with excess iodide (not simply iodine.) And on my ramblings, I read that one doctor never sees any problems arising with 9 drops iodine or less daily. Nor was I able to discern whether this was 2 or 5% Lugols. Nevertheless, I have scaled back my iodine intake to control detox symptoms.

  5. #3865
    sidewinder's Avatar
    sidewinder is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    69
    Thanks for the Seasnax tip, PaleoBird. I've recently gotten hooked on the Trader Joe's seaweed snacks but I didn't feel totally good about it because I believe they use an offensive oil for roasting. I will be ordering some of these!

  6. #3866
    Sceptic's Avatar
    Sceptic is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by Knifegill View Post
    I have fluoride-free toothpaste (available at any Super Supplements), and I do not drink tap water. I drive to the well to fill my 14 5 gallon bottles every month. And I do not ingest any bromide, either. THAT is the solution. Stop the poisoning and - amazingly - you stop needing an antidote. Imagine that!
    Interestingly, at least one of the celtic sea salts I looked at lately listed bromide in the list of minerals it contained.

  7. #3867
    Sceptic's Avatar
    Sceptic is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz View Post
    I think the Nit Pickers are all LIBERALS. The Hallmark of a LIBERAL is they demand that everyone do it THEIR way.
    For example, the conservative who doesn't like guns just doesn't buy a gun.
    The LIBERALS demand gun laws to prevent anyone from buying a gun.

    Conservatives who don't like Big Gulp Sugary drinks just don't drink them.
    Liberals pas laws to prevent EVERYONE from drinking Big Gulp Sugary drinks.

    Conservatives who don't like iodine just don't take it.
    Liberals try to outlaw iodine so NO ONE can have it.
    The Liberal/Conservative divide is a false dichotomy which doesn't really help anyone. It fosters stereotypes that help political parties to hide behind labels while acting in ways that are harmful to most of those who voted for them, and causes needless divisions amongst those who should have common cause.

  8. #3868
    Hawkward's Avatar
    Hawkward is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Kansas City area
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Sceptic View Post
    The Liberal/Conservative divide is a false dichotomy which doesn't really help anyone. It fosters stereotypes that help political parties to hide behind labels while acting in ways that are harmful to most of those who voted for them, and causes needless divisions amongst those who should have common cause.
    Well said.

  9. #3869
    Owly's Avatar
    Owly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,823
    Quote Originally Posted by Sceptic View Post
    Interestingly, at least one of the celtic sea salts I looked at lately listed bromide in the list of minerals it contained.
    That's because bromide is one of the minerals found naturally in seawater.

    Seawater - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  10. #3870
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    PrimalCon New York
    Quote Originally Posted by sidewinder View Post
    Thanks for the Seasnax tip, PaleoBird. I've recently gotten hooked on the Trader Joe's seaweed snacks but I didn't feel totally good about it because I believe they use an offensive oil for roasting. I will be ordering some of these!
    They are so tasty. I got them from an online site called Netrition.com which also carries Sea Tangle brand kelp noodles. Three ingredients, kelp, water, and salt. I made some for dinner tonight. (pics on my journal momentarily)

    Netrition.com also carries a lot of great coconut products and all at better prices than the local health food store. (No, I don't work for them.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •