Page 294 of 415 FirstFirst ... 194244284292293294295296304344394 ... LastLast
Results 2,931 to 2,940 of 4145

Thread: Iodine Anyone? page 294

  1. #2931
    Grizz's Avatar
    Grizz is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,879
    Primal Fuel
    T2T,

    You are Da MAN ! You showed up just in the niche of time to rescue me from a TOUGH question by Jaye ! What do I know about female temp swings with cycles ? DUH !

    You came through with an impressive answer!

    Grizz

  2. #2932
    t2t's Avatar
    t2t
    t2t is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    98
    @Grizz, I don’t think I quite gave the answer, that jaye seeks?

    @jaye, At first glance I would say during a given point in time during the cycle but the more I researched it, the more I would say the monthly average would be the way to go.

    This site really will open your eyes and shut down brain function, regarding the best time to get an exact true reading on a fertile lady.

    It has some tidbits of gold for all people too. 5 hours after being asleep seems to be the best time of night to get a true reading but as to several days before the period, or after it seems a crap shoot.

    Despite the fact that 158 years passed since Von Fricke`s
    study on vaginal temperature this basal body temperature is
    still probably the most widely used aid in the
    identification of the ovulation day. However, it seems that
    there was not much attention paid to the best hour of
    temperature recording after the onset of a nocturnal sleep.
    Based on recent studies it seems that 5 hours after
    nocturnal sleep onset can give a better basal body
    temperature recording that will more reflect the ovulatory
    effects upon the other factors.

    However, until more sleep studies are performed in women in
    a controlled manner, it will be difficult if not impossible
    to make any conclusive remarks about the appropriate time
    for BBT measurement.

    BBT, nocturnal sleep and ovulation
    Last edited by t2t; 06-14-2012 at 07:23 PM.

  3. #2933
    jaye's Avatar
    jaye is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by t2t View Post
    @Grizz, I don’t think I quite gave the answer, that jaye seeks?

    @jaye, At first glance I would say during a given point in time during the cycle but the more I researched it, the more I would say the monthly average would be the way to go.

    This site really will open your eyes and shut down brain function, regarding the best time to get an exact true reading on a fertile lady.

    It has some tidbits of gold for all people too. 5 hours after being asleep seems to be the best time of night to get a true reading but as to several days before the period, or after it seems a crap shoot.

    Despite the fact that 158 years passed since Von Fricke`s
    study on vaginal temperature this basal body temperature is
    still probably the most widely used aid in the
    identification of the ovulation day. However, it seems that
    there was not much attention paid to the best hour of
    temperature recording after the onset of a nocturnal sleep.
    Based on recent studies it seems that 5 hours after
    nocturnal sleep onset can give a better basal body
    temperature recording that will more reflect the ovulatory
    effects upon the other factors.

    However, until more sleep studies are performed in women in
    a controlled manner, it will be difficult if not impossible
    to make any conclusive remarks about the appropriate time
    for BBT measurement.

    BBT, nocturnal sleep and ovulation
    Yeah. I'm thinking the monthly average makes the most sense, too. Thanks T2T!

  4. #2934
    Owl's Avatar
    Owl
    Owl is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    309
    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz View Post
    @@owl,
    @@lizzy,

    I would LOVE to hear what excuse your doctors give for directing you not to take iodine, and what they will mumble when you tell them iodine is required for human health. Make them explain themselves.
    My doc is also a DO, who specializes in thyroid. He's open to most of what I suggest. But when I first went to him for my thyroid and told him I had just started on iodine, he said that the meds he was putting me on had some iodine in them. He didn't want me adding more to it - he persuaded me to hold off on it. Of course, the meds don't have very much. It sounded like he just wasn't knowledgeable about iodine, like most docs. I don't think he'll be upset with me, I got the feeling that he didn't think it was necessary to take much iodine.


    As far as taking temps for women, from STTM:

    WHAT ABOUT MENSTRUATING OR OVULATING WOMEN? Your internal body temperature can be very reactive to your female hormonal state, making it lower or higher than normal. So knowing what is going on within is important to evaluating a temperature. Check your temps before days 19 22 of your cycle, with day 1 being the day you started your period.

  5. #2935
    Owl's Avatar
    Owl
    Owl is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    309
    Quote Originally Posted by lizzychan5 View Post
    I think my doc is just pretty ignorant on the subject of iodine and it relating to the thyroid. He's a DO and deals a lot with holistic medicine, which is kinda why I went to him in the first place. I thought he might know a bit more then a typical MD general practitioner. When I first told him my symptoms he was sure I was hypothyroid too, but the tests came back normal (normal TSH, free t4 and free t3) and I came back negative with hashimoto's and graves disease. He didn't say I shouldn't take iodine, he kinda left me with the impression that he thinks it'll probably not help me with anything, but he gave me the go ahead to experiment with it. He actually thought lugol's solution was only available via a prescription, and was shocked I could just order it off amazon.
    Did he test ReverseT3? That can inhibit T3 from being utilized by your cells. So the T3 labs look great, but it's not doing anything for you. RT3 must be tested at the same time as FT3, and a ratio of the two is calculated.

    Also, according to STTM, FT3 should be at the top of the lab range, FT4 should be mid range or higher.
    Optimal Lab Values–how to interpret your results | Stop The Thyroid Madness

  6. #2936
    Grizz's Avatar
    Grizz is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,879
    All of this talk about female temperature reminds me of the tour we just completed at the Tennessee Amish Farms.

    The Amish live life as people did 150 yrs ago. No birth control and with large families. We visited several farms with > 12 children. Midwives deliver the babies. Women there are either nursing or pregnant, or both nursing AND pregnant.

    They still use the 1 room school houses, where young girls teach grades 1 through 8. After grade 8 it is off to the field to WORK. Between graduation & marriage, young ladies teach school. They cook on wood stoves, no TV, no computers, no telephones, no electricity. There is 1 shared telephone in each square mile of land. Washing machines? Old fashioned wringer washers powered by a diesel engine with driveshaft & pulleys.

    Very interesting how they power their saws & drills for woodworkig. They are allowed to use diesel or gasoline engines to power belts & pulleys to spin the drills & saw blades. They are not allowed to use gasoline powered generators to create electricity to power anything.

    Grizz

  7. #2937
    jaye's Avatar
    jaye is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by Owl View Post
    As far as taking temps for women, from STTM:

    WHAT ABOUT MENSTRUATING OR OVULATING WOMEN? Your internal body temperature can be very reactive to your female hormonal state, making it lower or higher than normal. So knowing what is going on within is important to evaluating a temperature. Check your temps before days 19 22 of your cycle, with day 1 being the day you started your period.
    Thanks for that!

  8. #2938
    lizzychan5's Avatar
    lizzychan5 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    177
    Quote Originally Posted by Owl View Post
    Did he test ReverseT3? That can inhibit T3 from being utilized by your cells. So the T3 labs look great, but it's not doing anything for you. RT3 must be tested at the same time as FT3, and a ratio of the two is calculated.

    Also, according to STTM, FT3 should be at the top of the lab range, FT4 should be mid range or higher.
    Optimal Lab Values–how to interpret your results | Stop The Thyroid Madness
    I was kinda pissed my reverse t3 was not examined, I'm going to my doc next week so I can ask him about it. What you say about ft3 and ft4 scares me. I have my labs right here, my free t3 was only 2.4 (ideal range is 2.3-4.2), so I'm literally only 0.2 points away from being below normal. My ft4 is about in the middle 1.2 (ideal 0.8-1.8).
    Last edited by lizzychan5; 06-15-2012 at 10:04 AM.

  9. #2939
    Owl's Avatar
    Owl
    Owl is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    309
    Quote Originally Posted by lizzychan5 View Post
    I was kinda pissed my reverse t3 was not examined, I'm going to my doc next week so I can ask him about it. What you say about ft3 and ft4 scares me. I have my labs right here, my free t3 was only 2.4 (ideal range is 2.3-4.2), so I'm literally only 0.2 points away from being below normal. My ft4 is about in the middle 1.2 (ideal 0.8-1.8).
    Since your FT4 is in the mid range, but FT3 is at the bottom, some of your T3 is probably being converted to RT3. Most doctors don't believe in RT3. You may need to print out some info on it to make your case.
    The lab ranges may be "normal" for some people, but they are not optimal. That's what we're after here.

  10. #2940
    t2t's Avatar
    t2t
    t2t is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    98
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Hi all,

    Heck. I too, learn something new every day. We are all made a little different. Normal body temperature for most is 98.6. But like everything else in life there are some exceptions to the norm. (rule) Of course those female hormones are truly the wild card also!

    Many people think that a "fever" is any temperature above 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit (equal to 37.0 degrees Celsius).
    It turns out, though, that our temperatures change constantly during a normal day. We tend to be cooler when we're asleep (especially at night), and warmer when we're awake and active. The "thermostat" in our brain, which controls blood flow to the skin (more when we're warm, less when we're cool), sweating (also more when we're warm and less when we're cool) and shivering (we shiver when we're too cool), tries most of the time to keep our temperatures between 97.5 and 99.5, and usually does a pretty good job of it.

    We define "fever" as a temperature of 100.4 F or higher. Unless your doctor suggests it, you shouldn't give anything for fever unless your child's temperature is 100.4 or higher (and possibly not unless it's higher than 101). (As always, remember that not all doctors do things the same way; if your doctor gives you different advice, you should follow it -- after all, your doctor knows your child better than I can.)

    Fever

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •