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Thread: Iodine Anyone? page 293

  1. #2921
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    Owl
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizzychan5 View Post
    I told my doc, who's a DO, that I was just starting to supplement with iodine and following Dr. Brownstein's protocol. My doc had actually heard of Dr. Brownstein and had a few of his other books but yet thought me supplementing with iodine was crazy. He was actually kinda mad that I was diagnosing myself.

    Ironically, after I posted what I did I just took my evening temperature and it read for the first time 98.0. I guess I am making progress, its just going real slow.
    My doc didn't want me on iodine, either, when I first went to him for my thyroid. I waited for months while we got my thyroid levels up, and then went on it. He still doesn't know. I will tell him the next time I go in.

    Your temps will fluctuate during the day. The basal body temp used for comparison is your temp first thing waking up, taken as you lay in bed.
    From Stop The Thyroid Madness:
    "HOW DOES MY TEMPERATURE DIAGNOSE HYPOTHYROIDISM? Generally, the average temperature of an adult with a healthy thyroid and a healthy metabolism is 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit or 37.0 degrees Celsius, and that occurs around mid-afternoon or 3 pm. So if you take your mid-afternoon temp and find it in low 98′s or even in the 97′s, you have been given a strong clue that you may be hypothyroid. And a few report their mid-afternoon temp being in the 96′s. BRRRR.

    Another temperature clue occurs first thing in the morning before you raise from your bed. Dr. Broda Barnes, a doctor who paid attention to clinical presentation and prescribed the pre-reformulated Armour, found that a healthy before-rising morning basal temp should be between 97.8 – 98.2. If it’s higher, you may be hyperthyroid, and if it’s lower, you are most likely hypothyroid. He also recommended under-the-arm temperature testing, but patients have found oral to be just as effective."

    Quote Originally Posted by breadsauce View Post
    So right. Which is why I use fluoride free toothpaste, don't swim in pools, eat organic when possible, don't use fabric conditioner or hair dye, no detergents with bleach, no sunscreen - in fact, about the only ready made thing I do use is ... wine. Goodness knows what is in that, but it can only be a small amount. And I have no pets. Our tap water has 0.1 parts fluoride per million, so I'm happy with that.

    I prefer trying really hard to avoid nasties than relying on taking large, large doses of anything else.
    Why not test yourself to see if and how much you need to supplement? I did.
    You'll need the 24 hr. Iodine Loading and Bromine tests.
    Hakala Research - Home

  2. #2922
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owl View Post
    My doc didn't want me on iodine, either, when I first went to him for my thyroid. I waited for months while we got my thyroid levels up, and then went on it. He still doesn't know. I will tell him the next time I go in.

    Your temps will fluctuate during the day. The basal body temp used for comparison is your temp first thing waking up, taken as you lay in bed.
    From Stop The Thyroid Madness:
    "HOW DOES MY TEMPERATURE DIAGNOSE HYPOTHYROIDISM? Generally, the average temperature of an adult with a healthy thyroid and a healthy metabolism is 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit or 37.0 degrees Celsius, and that occurs around mid-afternoon or 3 pm. So if you take your mid-afternoon temp and find it in low 98′s or even in the 97′s, you have been given a strong clue that you may be hypothyroid. And a few report their mid-afternoon temp being in the 96′s. BRRRR.

    Another temperature clue occurs first thing in the morning before you raise from your bed. Dr. Broda Barnes, a doctor who paid attention to clinical presentation and prescribed the pre-reformulated Armour, found that a healthy before-rising morning basal temp should be between 97.8 – 98.2. If it’s higher, you may be hyperthyroid, and if it’s lower, you are most likely hypothyroid. He also recommended under-the-arm temperature testing, but patients have found oral to be just as effective."[/url]
    I find my late evening (just before bed) temp to be usually the highest of the day, I took it right before I brushed my teeth so the hot water from that wouldn't effect my temperature. I'll take my mid afternoon around 3pm-ish on the weekends but during the work week I'll take it around 6pm once I get home from work, that temp has never been very high and is usually lower than my morning or late evening temp.

    Grizz, I'm hoping I don't need to go on any thyroid med's. Those things scare me, I don't want to be on a prescription med for life. I'm only 29, and pretty healthy besides some hypothyroid symptoms, so I don't think I'm that far gone. Hopefully I've caught this thing in time.

  3. #2923
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    @@owl,
    @@lizzy,

    I would LOVE to hear what excuse your doctors give for directing you not to take iodine, and what they will mumble when you tell them iodine is required for human health. Make them explain themselves.

    Grizz

  4. #2924
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz View Post
    @@owl,
    @@lizzy,

    I would LOVE to hear what excuse your doctors give for directing you not to take iodine, and what they will mumble when you tell them iodine is required for human health. Make them explain themselves.

    Grizz
    I think my doc is just pretty ignorant on the subject of iodine and it relating to the thyroid. He's a DO and deals a lot with holistic medicine, which is kinda why I went to him in the first place. I thought he might know a bit more then a typical MD general practitioner. When I first told him my symptoms he was sure I was hypothyroid too, but the tests came back normal (normal TSH, free t4 and free t3) and I came back negative with hashimoto's and graves disease. He didn't say I shouldn't take iodine, he kinda left me with the impression that he thinks it'll probably not help me with anything, but he gave me the go ahead to experiment with it. He actually thought lugol's solution was only available via a prescription, and was shocked I could just order it off amazon.

  5. #2925
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizzychan5 View Post
    I think my doc is just pretty ignorant on the subject of iodine and it relating to the thyroid. He's a DO and deals a lot with holistic medicine, which is kinda why I went to him in the first place. I thought he might know a bit more then a typical MD general practitioner. When I first told him my symptoms he was sure I was hypothyroid too, but the tests came back normal (normal TSH, free t4 and free t3) and I came back negative with hashimoto's and graves disease. He didn't say I shouldn't take iodine, he kinda left me with the impression that he thinks it'll probably not help me with anything, but he gave me the go ahead to experiment with it. He actually thought lugol's solution was only available via a prescription, and was shocked I could just order it off amazon.
    lizzy,
    that is so very interesting. That seems to be the general message we are getting about doctors. They are just not trained on iodine & simply don't know. Clearly a subject not covered in Med School?

    Grizz

  6. #2926
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owl View Post
    Another temperature clue occurs first thing in the morning before you raise from your bed. Dr. Broda Barnes, a doctor who paid attention to clinical presentation and prescribed the pre-reformulated Armour, found that a healthy before-rising morning basal temp should be between 97.8 – 98.2. If it’s higher, you may be hyperthyroid, and if it’s lower, you are most likely hypothyroid. He also recommended under-the-arm temperature testing, but patients have found oral to be just as effective."
    I am wondering about this. I chart my basal temperatures. An ovulating woman's temps change throughout her cycle. My lowest (pre-ovulation) are usually 97.6 and highest (post) are 98.8. How do you figure out your thyroid with those natural variations? Btw, I take mine vaginally, if that makes a difference.

  7. #2927
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    Wow Grizz,

    Your ther-"mom"-meter is such a fantastic find! One could never go wrong if your medical diagnoses instrument of choice is Mom approved.

    Women have some extra factors to consider when measuring their true temperature.

    Basal body temperature = BBTs

    The higher levels of estrogen present during the pre-ovulatory (follicular) phase of the menstrual cycle lower BBTs. The higher levels of progesterone released by the corpus luteum after ovulation raise BBTs. The rise in temperatures can most commonly be seen the day after ovulation, but this varies and BBTs can only be used to estimate ovulation within a three day range.[2]

    Basal body temperature is the lowest temperature attained by the body during rest (usually during sleep). It is generally measured immediately after awakening and before any physical activity has been undertaken, although the temperature measured at that time is somewhat higher than the true basal body temperature (see Fig. 1). In women, ovulation causes an increase of one-half to one degree Fahrenheit (one-quarter to one-half degree Celsius) in basal body temperature (BBT); monitoring of BBTs is one way of estimating the day of ovulation. The tendency of a woman to have lower temperatures before ovulation, and higher temperatures afterwards, is known as a biphasic pattern.

    Basal body temperature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    t2t

  8. #2928
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    Quote Originally Posted by t2t View Post
    Women have some extra factors to consider when measuring their true temperature.

    Basal body temperature = BBTs

    The higher levels of estrogen present during the pre-ovulatory (follicular) phase of the menstrual cycle lower BBTs. The higher levels of progesterone released by the corpus luteum after ovulation raise BBTs. The rise in temperatures can most commonly be seen the day after ovulation, but this varies and BBTs can only be used to estimate ovulation within a three day range.[2]

    Basal body temperature is the lowest temperature attained by the body during rest (usually during sleep). It is generally measured immediately after awakening and before any physical activity has been undertaken, although the temperature measured at that time is somewhat higher than the true basal body temperature (see Fig. 1). In women, ovulation causes an increase of one-half to one degree Fahrenheit (one-quarter to one-half degree Celsius) in basal body temperature (BBT); monitoring of BBTs is one way of estimating the day of ovulation. The tendency of a woman to have lower temperatures before ovulation, and higher temperatures afterwards, is known as a biphasic pattern.

    t2t
    Yes. Exactly. So how do you apply that healthy thyroid range of 97.8-98.2 (quoted above) to an ovulating woman's cycle? Is it the monthly average or do you take it at a certain point in the cycle?

  9. #2929
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    Hi jaye,

    I didn't see your post as I was typing mine at the time you posted. Anyway the thought about my wife who was going through menopause a few years back came in my head and it bothered me on a truly accurate measurement during menopause for her because her hormones were running amuck and she could have her cold foot on my back and suddenly it would heat up instantly. But for a premenopausal woman with the ovulation cycle... I don't know??? Oh. She is post now but even now her hormones get wild at times.

    I used to say "I'm sorry" once month for years. Now it seems like twice a week...

    t2t
    Last edited by t2t; 06-14-2012 at 01:57 PM.

  10. #2930
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    I used to say "I'm sorry" once month for years. Now it seems like twice a week...
    Not every day, like me?

    LJ
    Learning the intricacies of healthy eating and nourishing my body the right way.
    I am not bald, that is a Vitamin D collector. Time to Grok and Roll!
    Eased into a primal diet starting at Christmas 2011. Goal weight - 205 started: 240 pounds waist 40, now 227 pounds and waist 38 Summer 2012 - weight =215 and waist is actually still 39"
    ljbprrfmof = LJ = Little John = John

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