Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: making beef stock page

  1. #1
    adamm's Avatar
    adamm is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    323

    making beef stock

    So does anyone make their beef stock with the marrow intact? I mean, the way I've been familiar with it was always just bone (no marrow) and whatever left over bits of tendon/cartilage/whatever and boil it for hours (obviously with some onions, carrots, etc).

    Would marrow just make the stock all thick and opaque? Or does it clear out?

    --Me

  2. #2
    lev96's Avatar
    lev96 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    philadelphia, pa
    Posts
    96
    i just recently picked up 5lbs of bones from a nearby grass fed farmer (along with 50 lbs of meat! So exciting!!! ok back to topic...) The bones have marrow in them, but I have yet to make the stock. So, I too have a similar question about how it affects the taste/flavor/appearance. But, I do remember that Mark had posted something about him not caring about cloudy stock, but that may have been about the foam on top. Still, I don't think I would care about the appearance either, just whether it tastes good.

  3. #3
    lev96's Avatar
    lev96 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    philadelphia, pa
    Posts
    96
    here is Mark's posts on cooking with bones and another on bone marrow. he doesn't mention how the stock would be affected by marrow, but maybe one of the many comments has some hints in there (just haven't had time to read all the comments yet.)

    Cooking with Bones | Mark's Daily Apple

    Bone Marrow: Delicious, Nutritious and Underappreciated | Mark's Daily Apple

  4. #4
    adamm's Avatar
    adamm is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    323
    Quote Originally Posted by lev96 View Post
    here is Mark's posts on cooking with bones and another on bone marrow. he doesn't mention how the stock would be affected by marrow, but maybe one of the many comments has some hints in there (just haven't had time to read all the comments yet.)

    Cooking with Bones | Mark's Daily Apple

    Bone Marrow: Delicious, Nutritious and Underappreciated | Mark's Daily Apple
    So I was reading this, and I noticed that Mark recommends you don't cook chicken bones for more than 20 hours because they are light and small. 'Ello? I traditionally have simmered them for 3 hours, maybe 4. What am I missing? And beef bones for more than 24 hours? Really? How much more nutrition comes out of them after the initial 3 or 4 hours? I mean, I would assume it is law of diminishing returns?

    --Me

  5. #5
    TBywaters's Avatar
    TBywaters is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    12
    I got about 5 lbs of bones from the butcher and they cut them up for me. It was mostly "knuckles" or joints bones. I cooked mine overnight on a very low simmer after I brought it to boil. You may need to experiment with the lid so you can vent it but keep it simmering without boiling over.
    My broth came out very good. It formed into a solid gelatinous mass in the fridge, I think that is the marrow coming out of the bones. It is cloudy, but who really cares. The cloudy is the free floating minerals as far as I am concerned. Getting some more bones on Wed from our local grass fed cattle company. Yum!

  6. #6
    jammies's Avatar
    jammies is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,518
    I used to make beef stock with marrow bones, but I don't like it as much. Now I roast the bones, eat the marrow by itself and then use the bones for stock. For plain stock for drinking or quick soups I used chicken bones - which does have the marrow still in it.

  7. #7
    Primalest's Avatar
    Primalest is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    110
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Why not make it with the marrow? Alternatively, you could give the bones a good roasting, eat the marrow because it's delicious, then throw the bones into the pot to simmer and make the broth. Try it both ways! It can be fun.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •