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Thread: Calling gardeners / veg growers! page

  1. #1
    NorthernMonkeyGirl's Avatar
    NorthernMonkeyGirl is offline Senior Member
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    Hi *waves*


    I've been given the go ahead to create a little veg patch. Woo! By little, we're talking 1m x 2m or thereabouts. Because of the size, I'm thinking about "square foot gardening" http://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/schools_organic_network/leaflets/SquareFootGardening.pdf


    The trouble is trying to work out what to grow in each section, as I don't know what grows in which seasons, different harvest times, and I know sometimes plants inhibit each other??


    Also, a lot of traditional allotment plants are beans and sweetcorn - not primal! So any suggestions / tips would be appreciated!


    So far, I'm listing the veggies I enjoy eating!

    - broccoli (cut and come again variety; the plant itself is very large)

    - carrot? (relatively cheap in shops; prone to pests?)

    - beets

    - parsnip

    - celeriac

    - salad leaves (I grow these indoors fairly easily; is it worth wasting outdoor space?)

    - pak choi (grow to baby-size indoors as well)

    - leeks

    - squash (too big for sq.ft. garden??) - butternut, acorn

    - various herbs


    The root veg seem fairly carb heavy and wintery... what do people grow for summer??


  2. #2
    Sherissima's Avatar
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    Homegrown cherry toms are usually much tastier than shop bought ones (that is, if we get any sun in the UK!). I wasn't that successful with peppers, but if you can provide cover (greenhouse or cloches/tunnels) you should be able to grow them, as well as aubergines I believe.


    Other summer crops: radishes, kohlrabi (easy to grow, hard to buy), courgettes (I love the flowers too, lightly fried in batter - have to think about a Primal version), peas (eating pea shoots in salads too), green beans, spring onions, garlic...


    I must admit I've never grown carrots or parsnips as the soil in my garden was rather stony and that leads to stunted roots/weird shapes. Not sure how deep your square foot compost has to be...


  3. #3
    chima_p's Avatar
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    You can grow squash. Just use a trellis and grow up!


    Cucumbers too.


    Swiss chard, wax beans, heirloom tomatoes, hot peppers, garlic, onions, edible flowers...


    Mel's book goes into planting timing and a bit on companion planting.


  4. #4
    NorthernMonkeyGirl's Avatar
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    Cool, thanks


    So far I think it will be 3 "squares" north-south, and maybe 5 "squares" across east-west, so hopefully room for squash to grow up a trellis on the back (north) row.


    Would anything fit between squash plants if I alternated them, or would they shade out the adjacent squares?


    Also:

    celery

    mini cabbages?

    shallots

    "perpetual spinach"?


  5. #5
    NorthernMonkeyGirl's Avatar
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    Oooo - are there any small / miniture berry varieties? The only ones I'm familiar with are the big raspberry canes etc. And strawberries are only "ok" - I prefer the raspberries, tayberries and similar...


    (thanks for putting up with the questions - google brings up such different versions and opinions I prefer real life people to annoy!)


  6. #6
    Tara tootie's Avatar
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    Zucchini?! It grows so easily and is awesome! I would grow radishes and cukes to pickle. Also would def try for some japanese eggplant.

    Life on Earth may be punishing, but it includes an annual free trip around the sun!

  7. #7
    Annika's Avatar
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    If you don't already have the Square Foot Gardening book, it's definitely worth buying. It has tons of info on when to start seeds, when to transplant outside, how long until harvest, etc. - all in these great charts in the back of the book. I started SFG raised beds last spring using the book. Most things were a great success, except onions and tomatoes (terrible summer for tomatoes, no sun or heat, plus almost everyone was cursed with the late blight).


    Kale and arugula are some of my favorites. They are super cold-hardy too.

    My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
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  8. #8
    NorthernMonkeyGirl's Avatar
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    Another thought hit me (ouch!) - even though I won't eat beans or peas, should I still plant some for the nitrogen fixing? Or for bartering perhaps? Or to feed to my as-yet-non-existing chickens...?


  9. #9
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    Different, but related question. What is the best seed catalog?

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  10. #10
    Tara tootie's Avatar
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    Seed savers is great.


    www.seedsavers.org

    Life on Earth may be punishing, but it includes an annual free trip around the sun!

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