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Thread: Bone broth geletin page

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    Bone broth geletin

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    I made chicken bone broth last night and I noticed, this morning, after it had been in the refrigerator all night, the gelatin wasn't as firm as it normally becomes. When I poured it out it did "glop" and mound somewhat. Since I drink this for health, I want to know if I can expect the same vitamin and mineral etc. benefits as when I get a firmer gelatin. If not, I'll freeze it in some quart bags and use it for cooking and make a new pot. I'm try to get back to walking after breaking my thigh bone. Healing took longer than expected and I need to build strength besides. I feel like my energy has increased a great deal since I started about 2 months ago plus I simply feel better. (also noticed I misspelled gelatin in the title, don't know how to fix it)
    Last edited by Rosemary 231; 12-15-2011 at 09:46 AM.

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    Ajax's Avatar
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    What makes chicken stock gel? I usually make it from roasted chicken carcasses and it has never, ever gelled up. Should I be adding raw parts? Something else?

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    Farfalla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ajax View Post
    What makes chicken stock gel? I usually make it from roasted chicken carcasses and it has never, ever gelled up. Should I be adding raw parts? Something else?
    Don't you put too much water for too little chicken? And how long do you let your broth simmer?

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    Rosemary 231's Avatar
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    Since I started drinking bone broth I've made it from roasted chicken carcasses. It has always gelled beautifully. Did you add about 2 Tbls of Apple Cider Vinegar to the water? I don't know if that helps it gel but it's supposed to help draw all the good stuff out of the bones. I usually chop up an onion, add a couple of garlic cloves, chopped up a little and a stalk or two of celery. The vegetables are just for flavor and you don't have to add them at all. Considering how expensive the roasted chickens are, about $8, I am seriously going to learn how to roast a chicken correctly so it's moist and tender. I love the convenience of getting a hot one from the store but it is pricey.

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    Farfalla's Avatar
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    For whatever it is worth, I almost always use raw bones and meat, and my broth is always delicious and beautifully gelatinous. I don't think vinegar helps it gel - I started adding it a couple of weeks ago because I read about it here, but there's no change in this respect.

    Off to set up another broth - this time with 1/4 of a hen (if you use just chicken, you don't know what you are missing out on) and one turkey upper leg bone. And root vegetables, as usual.

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    Ajax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farfalla View Post
    Don't you put too much water for too little chicken? And how long do you let your broth simmer?
    I usually put just enough water to cover the chicken (and the pot is just big enough for the chicken) so I don't think it's an issue of too much water. I simmer for 2-3 hours. Should I simmer more? I also hadn't heard of the vinegar tip.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ajax View Post
    I usually put just enough water to cover the chicken (and the pot is just big enough for the chicken) so I don't think it's an issue of too much water. I simmer for 2-3 hours. Should I simmer more? I also hadn't heard of the vinegar tip.
    I never cover the chicken all the way with water. I cook it in about 1.5 cups of water until the chicken in all cooked through. I pull off the meat and then put the bones and skin back in the pot with 1-2 cups more water and then cook for 4-12 hours. Sometimes I add some onions and veggies too.

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    I let one batch go in the crockpot overnight and it didn't gel much. The second batch I did at least 24 hours and it gelled up great in the fridge! The ACV is to help leach minerals and vitamins out of the bones.

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    i simmer mine for 10 hours minimum with apple cider vinegar. i finally got it right! but yeah, i let the last batch evaporate pretty low and poured it into a mason jar, when it cooled it wound up being all gelatin
    beautiful
    yeah you are

    I mean there's so many ants in my eyes! And there are so many TVs, microwaves, radios... I think, I can't, I'm not 100% sure what we have here in stock.. I don't know because I can't see anything! Our prices, I hope, aren't too low!

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    Farfalla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ajax View Post
    I usually put just enough water to cover the chicken (and the pot is just big enough for the chicken) so I don't think it's an issue of too much water. I simmer for 2-3 hours. Should I simmer more? I also hadn't heard of the vinegar tip.
    Yes, I would try doubling the time. Or, if you have a crockpot, try 10-12 hours on low. And I would definitely add some raw meaty parts (can be from another animal) like necks, stomachs, hearts, but not liver - it's kind of gross when it is overcooked.

    To sum up: bones, meat, one carrot, one celery stick, a slice from the celeriac root, one parsley root, one average-sized unpeeled (but clean) onion, one unpeeled garlic clove, the dark green leafy top of a leek, a couple of parsley stems, water, salt, a splash of apple cider vinegar, at least five hours.

    I've just strained the broth I made overnight. Although it's still hot, it is visibly thick and kind of gelatinous.

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