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Thread: what if a man chose to keep squatting bodyweight, never adding to the bar? page

  1. #1
    dado's Avatar
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    what if a man chose to keep squatting bodyweight, never adding to the bar?

    what if he squatted body weight every session for a year.

    what would be the result of this? would there be any benefit for this man's body?

  2. #2
    Dirlot's Avatar
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    He would be able to squat is bodyweight for as many reps as he practiced on.
    Better than sitting down all day but not very progressive. It would be much better for him to progress onto pistol squats etc
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    This probably isn't the answer you're looking for, but: Did Grok increase the weights of the things he carried weekly/monthly/yearly? Did he up the amount of time that he walked? I know, it was his life to hunt and forage and pick up whatever needed to be picked up - so it would vary, but I doubt he purposely 'built it up' as time and strength progressed.

    Pretty much, I know nothing, but that was my attempt at looking at it through Grok's eyes.

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    Once you go beyond function, you're just wearing out your body for nothing. It's one thing to be able to carry two people over your shoulders to safety, but I really doubt grok hauled a whole elk home by himself in one piece. In my book once you've reached a decent benchmark for health you should maintain it, not exploit your body.


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    that would be a noble pursuit! nothing wrong with bodyweight squats!

    maybe trying a goblet squat or two with weight wouldn't hurt though...

    pistol squats are really flashy. that's about it. kiss your knees & ankles good-bye. you can't convince me that that's a natural movement for our bodies, sorry.

  6. #6
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    He'd be good at squatting his own body-weight. Nothing more.

    The reason for increasing resistance is to cause adaptation to that increasing stimulus in the most efficient way, especially since the majority of people have (often very)limited time to use their body.

    The human body responds insanely well to progressive overload, which we use throughout our lives(sit, stand, walk, run) and which was likely used by Grok(children moved/hunted what they could, by trail and error, getting stronger in the process).

    Of course if you are hunting, fighting, etc on a regular basis(and never "cheating" since such a thing didn't exist for Grok) you might have less interest in progressive adaption for vanity.

    I'd imagine if you offered Grok the chance to be stronger, faster, and therefore better at those thing with minimal investment, he'd likely be interested.

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    F*(&*(&%#@ Grok!!!!!!
    What a hypothetical caveman did over his lifetime to maintain the strength he developed as a child,
    has VERY LITTLE relevance to helping formerly fat and unfit people get closer to their healthy potential.
    Knifegill: How do you define, "going beyond function" anyhow? What does that mean, in practice? Does it mean the same thing for everyone? Honestly, for my former life, I was quite functionally fit by that definition -teaching classes and doing research are not impacted by the # of pushups I can do, and I know that my life didn't require me to run a mile without stopping, because I definitely couldn't do it.

    OP: I dunno - ask cheapo on the forum, he did simplefit for like two years and ended up looking quite buff - no idea what his true fitness is, though. I'm pretty sure that program has just bw squats for the lower exercise.
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    There's no exact definition of functional health, I get that. But there are also very few realities where people need to keep picking up bigger and bigger things to survive. Granted, any healthy person should be able to run a few miles and climb a tree, and lift reasonable heavy things. But when you keep pushing it, the tissues of the body will suffer. Our joints are not designed for the kind of stress body builders put on them, and the stress on the kidneys and liver from getting the metabolites out of our bloodstream after a heavy workout add up to damage.


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    I used to squat over 500# and used to use 400+ pounds for my regular workouts. If I could take that back I would. I am convinced my back problems that began in my later 20's and have persisted are the result of my pursuit of heavy lifts.

    It's not worth it. You have to live with your spine for life. Heavy lifts are great for sports if you are getting paid something worthwhile for the sacrifice. When done for vanity and ego you regret it later in life. Do heavy squates work for strength and size gains? Hell yes! Do you really need that much strength and or size? At a certain point the mass gets in the way of running and jumping.

    Let's face it very few people become paid bodybuilders, pro football players or competetive strongmen. All of these categories have health problems and pain later in life but they make money in their careers that should be comensurate with the risk.

    I would give up all of my personal lifting records I made as a Marine in the early 90's to have a healthy back now.

    I think pistols are cool and I am working technique on them in my progressions.

    For more power do plyometrics such ass box jumps. Get an old tire and a rope and pull that SOB for sprint reps. Push a sled, or a car around. You can develop great leg strength without loading up your spine with disc compressing weights. You will be stronger as you age if you consider that.
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  10. #10
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    Grok fought other Groks - a lot - and often to the death. When the weapons of the day are up close and personal, there is no question that "excess" strength was an advantage. See no reason to assume that a safe and fed Grok wouldn't exercise specifically to get (even) stronger.

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