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Thread: Running in Vibrams- why are my adductors sore afterward? page

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    Luckylis's Avatar
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    Running in Vibrams- why are my adductors sore afterward?

    Primal Fuel
    Currently training for a half-marathon and using Vibrams for the first time in my training. On my long runs, my adductors are completely sore and it hurts to move them at times. Why is this? They hurt more so than my hamstrings or calves do.
    Will the soreness go away after a while?
    Any good stretching excercises to recommend after my long runs to alleviate the adductor soreness?

    Thank you!

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    Because your legs are telling you to stop running. Mark posted about something like this not too long ago. When he ran marathons in his ultra lux, highly cushioned shoes, he could run forever. When switching to Vibrams, or barefoot running, you lose all of the science and are running with nothing more than what God gave ya. We are not intended to be long distance runners. Your legs hurt because you shouldn't be runnning that far.

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    Mike Gager's Avatar
    Mike Gager is offline Senior Member
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    or... you are using different muscles to run in your vibrams and they just arent use to it yet
    Primal Chaos
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    marteen's Avatar
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    Do your toes point straight ahead when you walk/run or do they point out a bit?
    Makin moves. Makin money. Makin bacon.

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    Luckylis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marteen View Post
    Do your toes point straight ahead when you walk/run or do they point out a bit?
    I haven't paid full attention to this detail, but I'd say perhaps they point out a bit.

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    marteen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luckylis View Post
    I haven't paid full attention to this detail, but I'd say perhaps they point out a bit.
    Bio-mechanically efficient running form becomes mandatory when running any significant distance barefoot/minimalist. I've had a lot of success improving my running form following the methods in "Chi Running" by Danny Dreyer. There are other methods, and a local running coach could help you even more. I went from giving myself somewhat serious plantar fasciitis running 5 miles in VFFs, to running 14 miles in them no problem. Just a little sore the next day, but no acute injury.

    I also ice bath my feet after *every* run now... no exceptions. :-)
    Makin moves. Makin money. Makin bacon.

  7. #7
    Chaloney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrimalJewishAmericanPrincess View Post
    We are not intended to be long distance runners. Your legs hurt because you shouldn't be runnning that far.
    Totally wrong. Don't listen to bs like this. The people who spout (I used to be one of them) are either too taken up with the primal dogma that they can't think anything else could be right, or they are looking for affirmation of their choice not to run long distances (this was me). I still don't run very far and don't currently have plans to, but we evolved to do a lot more than people give the human body credit for. Is it good to do a lot of long distance running, probably not, most especially at super high intensities. (PrimalJewisAmericanPrincess--I hope you don't take offense to the above, it was not meant as an attack against you, rather against the idea that the human body is somehow not "supposed" to run. You can have the soapbox back now, I'm done

    Back on topic, I agree that your shoes have led to a change in your gait that is requiring greater use of these muscles, and if you take it slowly, you will adapt. This (adapting) is exactly what your body was designed to do.

  8. #8
    critta's Avatar
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    It is not uncommon for your body to go through multiple phases of adjustment when making the transition. The starting points are generally the same for most runners "Oh dear lord my calves" at first then you will move past that and the problems will manifest themselves in other areas. You are simply finding the next weakest link in your chain. As a previous poster mentioned its all about running form. Most people focus on distance/speed but many experience minimalist/barefoot runners will tell you to focus only on your form because all of the rest will follow. It can take a year or more for your body to re-adjust since you were likely in shoes for a much longer portion of your life than you have been in minimalist/barefoot shoes.

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    Perhaps your gait has become "scissored" after a few miles? Butterfly stretches!
    Proud Bangmaid since August 2009

  10. #10
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    Your body IS used and ment to run long distances..
    your muscles are sore because for the first time of your life they actually work like they should and not supported by big fancy running shoes and because (i hope for you) you are forefoot striking for the first time and not heel striking.. and they need to get used to it.. dont try to push through it.. switching to barefoot/minimal running takes time and progression. try running 5 minutes a day for a week or so.. then 10 minutes a day.. or else you will injure yourself..
    Your muscles are sore because they are weak.. the shoes been doing the job for them..
    and btw, in nature your leg muscles are getting used to walk/run barefoot when your actually learning to walk and to run at early age.. this is why its naturally progressive..but when you do it at older age.. you need to stop yourself from doing too much/too soon/too fast.

    BTW feel free to youtube/google "Tarahumara".. it is an mexican tribe known for his people to be "super athletes", running hundreds of miles barefoot or with very thin sandals called "huaraches", and they do it for years and years from early age to very old age.

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