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Thread: Yet another bone broth question... page

  1. #1
    VeloCity.X's Avatar
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    Yet another bone broth question...

    Primal Fuel
    So over the past week I've managed to gather carcasses from a chicken, a duck, and a turkey. Now I know I *can* combine all 3 to make a bone broth.... but *should* I?

    I've read a lot of things about how awesome duck and goose fat are for cooking, so I did save the duck fat when I roasted it. Would the same hold for the bone broth? Would the duck bone broth be yummy enough that I should make it separately from the rest?

    Does my duck play well with others?

    Thanks in advance.
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  2. #2
    DarthFriendly's Avatar
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    Naw, just toss 'em all in.

    Duck soup is amazing if you have enough bones to make it like that, but if not it'll be fine with the other bones. Enjoy.

    (Now I want duck soup made by chinese aunties.... dammit!)

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    The difference will be in the flavor. If you do the carcasses separately you will get chicken broth, duck broth and turkey broth. They do taste differently -- chicken broth is probably one you do know the flavor of -- it is the mildest and blends with darn near anything. Turkey is a bit richer and duck richer still (sort of goes with the amount of dark meat found on each animal.) Duck makes great duck soup. Turkey makes great turkey soup. But you can use any of them as a basic broth.

    I am going to try a chicken/turkey combo this weekend -- more turkey, since I have two turkey carcasses and just some extra chicken pieces. I'd say do what is easiest if you don't have a lot of time, or if I was separating, I'd separate out the duck, tho you won't get as much broth from a single duck carcass.

    I usually add about 1/4 cup or so apple cider vinegar to the crockpot -- to much vinegar makes the broth a bit acidic. I usually throw in a couple of stalks of celery and carrots as well. For the last several hours, I usually put in a bouquet garni -- I wrap a teaspoon or two of Herbs de Provence and some dried parsley in a bit of cheesecloth and tie it up securely. It adds a bit of flavor to the broth which I enjoy.

    Enjoy your broth.
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  4. #4
    JeffC's Avatar
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    I would be wary but I can only base that on the one time I tried to do a stock with bison and lamb bones and it tasted odd, I am sure it was the lamb. Maybe some things are just not meant to be mixed?

  5. #5
    otzi's Avatar
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    turducken bone broth sounds wonderful! i'm 18 hours into an experiment of my own...turkey and ham bones in the crockpot along with the turkey stuffing (celery, oranges, onions, and apples) . House smells better today than yesterday!

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    Meadow's Avatar
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    I guess my thought is if you haven't made stock before, you might want to do them separate so you can figure out what flavors you like and don't.

    I usually make chicken stock with 2-3 chicken carcasses and a 12 qt stock pot or one medium to large turkey. So maybe you could do the duck and chicken (since chicken has a mild flavor), and the turkey separate.

  7. #7
    VeloCity.X's Avatar
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    Ok, just for the time factor, I ended up doing all the carcasses together. I was a bit worried that the turkey, which was smoked, would be overpowering, but that does not seem to be the case. Tasted pretty good, I think, but definitely needs salt. And I thought the carcasses had been picked fairly clean, but I ended up with a 2 qt sauce pan chock full of small bones, veggie bits, and meat. I pulled out the large bones before straining. Unfortunately I no longer have a worm farm, compost pile, or garden to dispose of the meat and especially bones. Gues they are going in the trash.

    Ended up simmering it for about 13 1/2 hours. Since it was on the stove I didn't feel comfortable letting it go over night.

    So now the big question is.... What do I do with it? I've got 6 1/2 quarts of undoubtable rich cloudy stock. Any good ideas? Do people really just drink it straight? Regularly? I could use some recipe help. Obviouly I won't be making dumplings or noodle soups like I have in the past...
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  8. #8
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    If it's strained really well (through a cheesecloth or jellybag or clean tea towel...or in my case some kitchen roll..) then boil the bejesus out of it, reduce it right down and freeze in small pots, maybe 100/150ml, 1 cup?? So you can add the concentrated stock to any soup or stew you fancy. When you're waiting for it to cool, if it goes to jelly with a layer of fat on top then you've got a damn good stock

    It goes well in vegetable soups, not only for taste but to bump up the nutrition.

  9. #9
    otzi's Avatar
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    I warm up a cup full of bone broth and drink it straight about 30 minutes before I eat dinner. Or, sometimes an hour before bed.

  10. #10
    Linny's Avatar
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    Can I ask a question about bone broth too? Do people remove the fat? I made some beef bone broth a few weeks ago and I made 8 cups but 1/4 of it ended up being just fat. I couldn't bring myself to drink it.

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