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  1. #1
    Goldstar's Avatar
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    Yogurt Question

    Primal Fuel
    I am able to buy locally farm-made yogurt with live cultures in it (although the milk is pasteurized in the process.) I understand that most store bought yogurts are not fermented long enough to eliminate lactose and I like the idea of yogurt that has been fermented 24 to 36 hours. I cannot get an answer back as to how long the farm ferments theirs but I am having some slight digestion issues with it.

    Is it possible for me to put my locally made live culture yogurt into a yogurt machine and ferment it longer on my own? Has anyone done this? If so, I'm going to ask for a yogurt machine for Christmas!

  2. #2
    Diana Renata's Avatar
    Diana Renata is offline Senior Member
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    Hmm... this might be something you'd be interested in then...

    Cultures for Health: Yogurt Starter, Sourdough Starter, Kombucha, Kefir Grains, Cheese Making and more | Supplies for a Real Food Lifestyle

    And for what it's worth, yogurt is pretty easy to make- especially Kefir.

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    Roary's Avatar
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    Yogurt is very easy to make. I use a cheapo yogurt maker to re-enact the European style yogurt I first had in Bali. I find it superior to any store-bought yogurt I've ever purchased.

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    Goldstar's Avatar
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    Thank you for your replies. I have read that yogurt is fairly simple to make. I thought my idea would be even easier since the yogurt is already started and I am thinking I can simply bring it home from the store and make it ferment longer once I get it home. Any reasons why this might not work?
    Last edited by Goldstar; 11-23-2011 at 04:34 PM.

  5. #5
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    The only reason I can think that it might not work is if the cultures have died. But since most recipes for MAKING yogurt say just to use a few spoonfuls of plain live store bought yogurt I'm guessing that might work. I'd say try it!

    The recipe I played with this week said to incubate the yogurt at 50 C (122 F). I just filled a cooler with hot enough water and put the jar of yogurt in there and left it overnight. Seems to have worked.

    Let us know what happens if you try it!

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    Roary's Avatar
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    Diana Renata, that website is fabulous! I'm going to order a few different cultures for compare-and-contrast. Thanks!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roary View Post
    Diana Renata, that website is fabulous! I'm going to order a few different cultures for compare-and-contrast. Thanks!
    Indeed! That is an awesome website! Thanks Diana!

  8. #8
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    I make large quantities of lactose free yoghurt. I invested in a yoghurt maker, and use 4 teaspoons of live yoghurt starter to 1 litre of milk. If I leave this to ferment for 24 hours, it is lactose free, and you can use the result as a starter for your next batch (you'll get about 6 batches). What I also do is to freeze the yoghurt I used initially as a starter in an ice-cube tray (2 teaspoons per cube), and then defrost the appropriate amount when needed. It works really well, and doesn't kill the culture! Saves a shed-load of money, too!

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