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Thread: What do I do with pig's trotters? page

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    Hilary's Avatar
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    What do I do with pig's trotters?

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    Found pig's trotters on a market stall, and found courage (and 70p) and bought a couple. So far I've hidden them in the freezer. What do I do with them? (Is there a way to get stock and crispy bits?)

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    breadsauce's Avatar
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    I don't do the crispy bits! But they a great added to a chicken carcass to make stock. Very gelatinous and yummy.

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    Hilary's Avatar
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    Ah - I have a freezer full of chicken bones (not literally); I could do that. Just seems a shame to have skin of pig and not scratchings, doesn't it?

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    Is it just the feet, or do have ham hocks? If you've got ham hocks, you can cook it in sauerkraut and they'll both come out even more delicious. For feet about the only option I can think of is to use them for stock.

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    i tend to give trotters to my fave pigdog as a treat. they would make very gelatinous stock if you just wanted stock. or you could prob boil them up an make some kind of soup. just cook them forever till the flesh comes off the bone. throw in veges and herbs some way into the process and you will have soup. if you wanted crispy skin, you could either cut it off with a very sharp knife and grill it or fry it till crispy. then stock the rest. or you could try roasting? are they fresh or smoked?

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    Hilary's Avatar
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    Fresh, and just the feet. Would they roast, or would everything just come out gristly and horrible?

    (This is a great forum, btw. Never expected so many suggestions for getting the most out of my 70p.)

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    Got some in the freezer myself. I had thought to add them to a stew, but stock sounds lovelier still.

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    seaweed's Avatar
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    i dont know how they would roast but you wont know till you try! I imagine they'd be like cow shin. the theory is the closer to the bone the meat is, the sweeter it is. so maybe a long slow roast or a long slow boil up. pork bones, as in boil up pork bones, are divine. you need decent waxy potatoes to boil with them. i guess you could sub with swedes and parsnips too. boil them up for ages. throw in cabbage, watercress, puha etc when it is almost done. most of these stews are even better reheated the next day.

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    seaweed's Avatar
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    bumping this coz i found a recipe here for twice cooked pork belly
    Cuisine - Food & Recipes
    it's about 3 or so recipes down the page but i think the principle would work with pig's trotters and you could prob get some stock off from boiling them for an hour first.

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    breadsauce's Avatar
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    This looks good - all bar the breadcrumbs!!

    Slurp & Burp: Pig trotters - pied de cochon

    And you can always boil the trotters for 3 hours, carefully remove the skin, put the shredded meat in a bowl with the chopped gelatin bits, add enough of the stock to moisten well, flavour with salt, pepper, a touch of ground cloves and mace and herbs of your choice, tip into a terrine and allow to set. Pour any of the fat left over the top. Serve as a cross between a pate and rillettes.

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