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Thread: Cordain on Acid-Alkaline Balance: argument against zero carb? page 4

  1. #31
    Tarlach's Avatar
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    Grok didn't add salt to food and we didn't evolve eating it.


    The fist evidence of salt mining occurred less than 8,000 years ago.


    It's a Neolithic solution and it is not good for you.
    [quote]

    Conclusions: High salt intake is associated with significantly increased risk of stroke and total cardiovascular disease.
    </blockquote>


    http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content-nw/full/339/nov24_1/b4567/


    Diseases linked to salt consumption: Hypertension, stroke, osteoporosis, kidney stones, Menierre&#39;s Syndrome, stomach cancer, insomnia, motion sickness, asthma, exercise induced asthma.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  2. #32
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    Tarlach, the keyword is "high".

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  3. #33
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    If smoking a lot of cigarettes significantly increases your chances of lung cancer, you think that just having a few isn&#39;t doing you any harm?


    Read the studies, &#39;high&#39; isn&#39;t a lot.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  4. #34
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    Sodium is required from diet in some amount, so is potassium.


    I personally think the acid-base theory is a load of crap with no science at all to back it up.


    Blood/body acidity is tightly regulated at the kidneys.


  5. #35
    Tarlach's Avatar
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    I&#39;m only saying you can benefit from minimizing salt consumption. There&#39;s plenty of sodium already in PB food, without adding more to the diet.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  6. #36
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    Yebb most foods contain trace amounts which are probably enough.


  7. #37
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    @Tarlach, a sprinkle of salt on a steak for a nice taste is far from high. How is that even comparable to smoking a cigarette? You&#39;re making things complicated now. Besides, weren&#39;t you the one that said the body is able to regulate itself? I don&#39;t see how that can&#39;t be applied to sodium.

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  8. #38
    Tarlach's Avatar
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    One of the higher natural sources of sodium is eggs. One large cooked egg has 62 mg of sodium in it.


    Generally, a pinch of salt would be 1/16 teaspoon according to most chefs. One level teaspoon of salt contains approximately 6,200 mg sodium chloride, or approximately 2,400 mg sodium.

    So one pinch of salt contains 160 mg of sodium or nearly 3 eggs worth (with no other nutrients).


    Yes the body can regulate, but how much can it handle? Just one pinch of salt can make a significant difference to sodium intake. Bacon is about 50 times higher in sodium than the pork belly it comes from.


    That&#39;s a fair bit to ask your body to try and regulate. It&#39;s used to a decent balance, not massive orders of magnitude difference...


    * the 100mmol they are talking about in the study is about 2300mg (or 150g of bacon). Less than one teaspoon of salt significantly increased risk of stroke and total cardiovascular disease.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  9. #39
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    I&#39;m concerned about the acid/alkaline issue because I heard a doctor (MD, naturopath) talking about how an "acidic body" is host to all kinds of disease.


    When I go very low carb (<20g), I feel great, but when I test my urine, it&#39;s way high acidic. If I add a bunch of veggies, I can get a balance, but I&#39;d really prefer eating very low carb (mostly fish, meat, eggs).


    But I don&#39;t want to go so low carb if, in fact, I&#39;m courting medical trouble this way.


  10. #40
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    I dunno, I haven&#39;t seen anything conclusive on this one to convince me one way or the other. Cells do prefer an alkaline environment, so unless you are going to an extremely alkaline diet (unlikey if eating primal), then it&#39;s not going to hurt to increase alkalinity. And the hypothesis that there can be bone mineral loss from an acidic diet is disturbing (if it is true, again, I think there needs to be more study done).


    When I was laid up with a broken foot a couple years ago, I used a TENS machine to aid in the speed of the bone repair. There are studies in rabbits which showed a 40% increase in bone repair using this technique, and it&#39;s believed to work be creating a net alkaline charge in the area of the fracture.


    One thing you can do to increase alkalinity is alkaline water. My tap water comes from a watershed with a lot of plant matter, which creates fairly acidic water (ph 6.5, capilano watershed). You can buy water alkanizers for lots of $$$. Good machines often cost a few thousand dollars, although last year saw some drops in price, so you can get ones for $1,500 or so. Still a lot of money for most of us! Although it is also believed that many of the health benefits touted by this water may come from it&#39;s antioxidization properties than from it&#39;s alkalinity. I make alkaline water on the cheap using prill beads (aka magic hippie beads). You put a bag of prill beads in a gallon jug of water and it&#39;ll increase it&#39;s alkalinity. No idea how it works, they don&#39;t tell you how the beads are made, other than they came from a result of experiments trying to clean-up Lake Mead. But I got my bag for $20 and it&#39;s supposed to last for years, so it&#39;s certainly cheap. I measured the pH of my prilled water and it raised the pH from 6.5 to about 8, so it is doing *something* to the water ... although the water alkanalizing machines can crank the pH up to 10.


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