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Thread: European/Northern Hemisphere page

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    European/Northern Hemisphere

    Primal Fuel
    I can't really find anything about this but i have a few questions.

    I'm white and live in the uk, what would my diet look like 10,000+ years ago? I'm pretty sure i wouldn't have had coconuts and sweet potatoes (or potatoes at all).

    So i guess my question is, what food stuffs are native to the UK/Europe?

    Thanks

    Sorry if this has been discussed before, cos i'm pretty sure it will have! Any links would be great cos the search function on the forum isn't very good :/

  2. #2
    Leida's Avatar
    Leida is offline Senior Member
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    Try looking up Nordic Diet, it can be easily adopted to Paleo style, by substituting cold tubers such as beets and potatoes for sweet potatoes, and making emphasis on cold crops like cabbages, nordic fish, meats and dairy (including animal fat) and, if, wanted, buckwheat and millet (instead of rice). I am planning on doing Paleo-Nordic this winter.
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    I grew up in Germany with my mum growing a lot of her own veg. What you'd be able to grow on your own without the aid of greenhouses etc is probably a good starting point. Some things like potatoes are indeed imported, but I am not terribly up to speed what those are (other than nightshades).
    Something like eat the seasons could probably help in terms of looking at some lesser known foodstuff. Although the focus is on time of year, they do tend to stick with local as well.

    As for animals, the UK was pretty much one big forest, so deer, game of any kind, boar, and lots and lots of fish, seafood and seaweed I imagine. The coast is never very far. A few days trip for some easy fishing would be well worth it to nomadic or even somewhat settled Grok.

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    dado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grouchos_tash View Post
    I can't really find anything about this but i have a few questions.

    I'm white and live in the uk, what would my diet look like 10,000+ years ago? I'm pretty sure i wouldn't have had coconuts and sweet potatoes (or potatoes at all).

    So i guess my question is, what food stuffs are native to the UK/Europe?

    Thanks

    Sorry if this has been discussed before, cos i'm pretty sure it will have! Any links would be great cos the search function on the forum isn't very good :/
    You're what? Race doesn't exist. Stop being a racist.

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    jfreaksho's Avatar
    jfreaksho is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado View Post
    You're what? Race doesn't exist. Stop being a racist.
    I think he was talking about his skin color, not his race. Like albino, or something. Some people have darker or lighter skin than others, even among family members sometimes.

    Relax, dado.

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    Legbiter's Avatar
    Legbiter is offline Senior Member
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    During that time Northern Europe was inhabited by the Maglemosian culture. So basically Groks living in bands subsisting on hunting and fishing.

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    Ingvildr's Avatar
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    I'm a viking age re-enactor and have studied the norse time period which isn't quite as far back but definitely before you could ship anything anywhere in a few days. Root vegies: beets, carrots, parsnips, turnips(rutabagas are a modern cross), onions. Most cabbage family plants although less refined. A multitude of green leafy plants that aren't commonly eaten now-I would look up a local wild forage or bushcraft group. Hazelnuts, acorns, plums, sloes, cherries, pears, apples. I believe the UK also has quite a few berries, that I wouldn't be familiar with living on the northwest coast of the US. There would be fish, shellfish and game, foraged eggs(mostly a springtime food). You would not see any nightshade family, tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant. Cucumbers would be unlikely and squash not at all. Most beans are new world except fava, lentils and peas, as is corn(maize). Grapes are iffy, depending on how warm the climate is at the time. The viking age was warm and grapes grew in England far to the north of where they grow now. The vikings had barley, oats and rye and were aquainted with wheat but couldn't grow it. Honey would be a rare treat. This is hardly a comprehensive list and a lot of fruits and vegies were bred intensively to get what you see today. For viking age foods, the 'viking answer lady' website is good.

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    no suggestions, but..

    I think it's a really valid question, and one I've wondered about in the past too. It seems more than possible that just as our skin adapted to climate (paler skin absorbing low levels of vit D better) so our bodies may have adapted to the available diet. Or perhaps, we didn't adapt to some things that other ethnic groups may tolerate better, such as the nightshades. I've always wondered whether it's really a good idea to stock up on so much coconut oil, turmeric, etc. when these cannot possibly have been part of our evolutionary diet (at least, not for a very long time). It would be very interesting if Mark could cover this some time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dado View Post
    You're what? Race doesn't exist. Stop being a racist.
    Sorry if i didn't explain myself very well. I meant that because i have white skin, I'm obviously quite far removed from my original African brothers and sisters and so, if my skin has had time to evolve so could my dietary adaptations.

    Obviously I don't have any way of knowing who my ancestors are or where they were hanging out over 10,000 years ago. My mother has dark curly hair and olive skin, which to me could suggest the Mediterranean and my dad looks like a Viking (tall and broad with ginger/blond hair). So where does that leave me? Choosing between beets or tomatoes? Haha!

    Thanks for the replies everyone, they've been really interesting! I might start experimenting with my diet again!

  10. #10
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    sunnysara is offline Senior Member
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    I have wondered about this too! I eat quite a bit of coconut (oil or butter), which I obviously would not have had access to way back when!

    I am of (mostly) Danish descent, but American living in the Northwest...

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