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Thread: Does Anyone Just Not Care? page 3

  1. #21
    pace2race's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigerLily View Post
    And, you know, not to be all Debbie Downer, but there ARE real health implications from all that running. I can't tell you how many hip replacements I've seen in the course of my job on runners only in their 40s. If you've ever seen a fairly young person trying to walk with a new hip replacement, it is at best sobering .... at worst, alarming. Hopefully, the absence of grains and other inflammatory agents and running barefoot will lessen the wear and tear for the runners here.
    I've ran 17,639 miles since 2006, none of it barefoot. The implications for me have been a lower heart rate and blood pressure. My hips are just fine. I took part in a bone study of men who exercise that ran over the course of a year. My lower spine is osteopenia and my hips are normal denisty as shown by the dexa scans. I do weight training and supplements to improve the lower spine density. I'm 49 years old. I have met hundreds of people many masters age running since I've started back up and more on the internet. I know two men personally in their 70's that run nearly every local race. In 2010 at Pikes Peak Ascent and Maraton there was an 81 year old man that I saw do both events. I don't know any of them that have needed a hip replacement. The long term consequences for most of us include increased pleasure through socializing with a common interest and a shared joy of competition for many a good charitable cause.
    Last edited by pace2race; 11-25-2011 at 04:44 AM.

  2. #22
    Blah's Avatar
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    Running is not chronic cardio, running is not all bad, stop spreading this bullshit.

    What makes it chronic is prolonged running at a high intensity eg. 90% max for 2 hours.

    A sprint is just a very fast run.
    www.back-to-primal.blogspot.com or on Facebook here

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  3. #23
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    A 100 year old man finished the Toronto Scotiabank Marathon this year. I ran the half when he was running the full at age 92, then ran the half with him when he was 93. He's a wee Sihk man with a huge yellow turban, probably weighs 100 lbs. Amazing. Three days before the marathon, he went to a track and broke 8 world records for shorter distances for his age group! His advice as to how he does it?

    "Ginger curry, cups of tea and being happy. Be stress-free. Be grateful for everything you have, stay away from people who are negative, stay smiling and keep running." Fauja Singh

    Check out his story here: 100-year-old sets record with marathon finish - Toronto - CBC News

    You should do what gives you joy. If running gives you joy...run. When it stops being joyful, stop. That should keep you healthy.

  4. #24
    marthat's Avatar
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    A 100 year old man finished the Toronto Scotiabank Marathon this year. I ran the half when he was running the full at age 92, then ran the half with him when he was 93. He's a wee Sihk man with a huge yellow turban, probably weighs 100 lbs. Amazing. Three days before the marathon, he went to a track and broke 8 world records for shorter distances for his age group! His advice as to how he does it?

    "Ginger curry, cups of tea and being happy. Be stress-free. Be grateful for everything you have, stay away from people who are negative, stay smiling and keep running." Fauja Singh

    Check out his story here: 100-year-old sets record with marathon finish - Toronto - CBC News

    You should do what gives you joy. If running gives you joy...run. When it stops being joyful, stop. That should keep you healthy.

  5. #25
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    Boy, marthat, that story was so good it was worth saying twice!

    I agree with what a lot of people are saying here... it's a question of attitude. If you love just getting out and going for a run, very unlikely you will be hitting cronic cardio. If you've 'got to get your miles in' it's a lot more likely to be chronic cardio.

    Just my though but the more running on a treadmill, the more likely it is to be chronic cardio. The more obsessed with the numbers and the heart rate and the grade, the more likely it is to be chronic cardio.

    Ironically in some ways, though, the more fit and accomplished the athlete, the higher the workload they can sustain and not be in chronic cardio mode. I know from my own experience (mainly cycling) that the vast majority of my riding, and even much of my racing, was below that threshold. It was more a question of being able to call on those reserves - sprinting or just a sustained high effort - when required. The more fit I was the more often and longer times I could utilize them.

    But now, I mainly just go out and ride 'cause it's fun. I'm not afraid of the effort of racing, but just not sure how that fits in my goals anymore. I'm trying to run again, but more focusing on transitioning to barefoot/minimalist type forefoot stride.

    Yep, follow your bliss.
    Trying a journal. We'll see how long that lasts....

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread37152.html

  6. #26
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    I don't think there is any real controversy here - long distance running definitely causes health issues. If you do it, then do it. Mark's whole "chronic cardio" thing is not saying "don't run" - he's saying, "don't believe it's healthy to run lsd every day". Personally I'd need a bear chasing me to get the motivation to run more than a 5k max. I can't imagine a more boring sport - even baseball is more exciting to me.
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfarny View Post
    I can't imagine a more boring sport - even baseball is more exciting to me.
    The half marathon I ran was so damn boring, I want to do a marathon but I know it will be even worse.
    www.back-to-primal.blogspot.com or on Facebook here

    My training journal if anyone is interested

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  8. #28
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    Who cares if anyone cares

    I'm with the runners. I used to do lots of running and got burned out. Now I just jog for 45 - 60 minutes a couple of times per week. It gives me a nice high without beating my body into the ground. Although I have to admit that last weekend I did a 5K and one of the sponsors was "Chick-fil-a". There was a very annoying guy dressed in a chicken suit running along making rude comments. I just had to run him down. Couldn't contain the competitive urges. Oh well...

  9. #29
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    I have been running for over 20 years. Mostly long slow distances. I just got bored putting 6 miles in a day, 5 days a week with a long run on the weekends. It was my social life. My friends were runners. Now I take a boot camp class every day. It is inside an Olympic style gymnastic gym. The floor is padded and on springs. We run barefoot, and utilize the equipment as an obstacle course. I do very well at mud runs now. I get a kick of the surprised look on the faces of the kids around me when I beat them up and over slippery walls. Do what makes you happy...and that runners high?...Well, that is not a myth

  10. #30
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    I actually hate running. I'll never do it, but if you enjoy it then just be sensible about it and carry on.

    I rode 50k on a bike yesterday, 4 hours or so. It was over tough terrain and was very taxing by the end. However, i only do this every week or usually every two weeks. I feel it is very beneficial for me to do this because it's outside, demanding, varied and above all fun. I would never do it more than once a week though, during which i do o'lifting(though not that heavy) and gymnastic exercises.

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