Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Need advice on primal fitness:) page

  1. #1
    Mickie's Avatar
    Mickie is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    7

    Need advice on primal fitness:)

    Shop Now
    I live in South Dakota and the winters are horrible here so it makes it hard to do anything physical outside...I have been eating primal for about 6 months (switched from the Atkins Diet bacause it made more sense) and so I have been wanting to get a toned body. The PB way of eating has made me very happy, and I plan to do it forever. I just need some insight on what workouts to do around my house since I am not a fan of the gym. I am more than willing to work out and have been for a month now but I feel like I need more options. I enjoy free weights and sprinting and definately love using my own body weight to do my work outs. Any help on this would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    primalrob's Avatar
    primalrob is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Manchester, NH
    Posts
    2,142
    take a look at primal blueprint fitness right here on this site. the only equipment you need is a pull up bar. i've been doing it for a while, and i enjoy it way more than anything i used to do in the gym.

  3. #3
    iniQuity's Avatar
    iniQuity is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    5,683
    Quote Originally Posted by primalrob View Post
    take a look at primal blueprint fitness right here on this site. the only equipment you need is a pull up bar. i've been doing it for a while, and i enjoy it way more than anything i used to do in the gym.
    Yep.

    Get a pull up bar, for door frames there's two options and both present their own set of options:

    - The one that goes on the frame (most popular model, so you're likely to find this one in any sporting good store) can also be used as push-up handles, and to do static holds such as L-sit and tuck-planche (which you should be doing)
    - The "straight bar" is something I just purchased (but it hasn't arrived and I'm beginning to think I got took on amazon....) I got because I want to be able to set the height where I want it. If for instance you put it at hip level or below, you could do tricep extensions on it, the lower you set the bar, the harder these become. You can also do australian pull-ups by having the bar lower, you can hop on the bar and do straight-bar dips, or put it higher and do regular pull-ups. As you progress, you can try to do muscle ups on this bar, something you cannot do on the door-frame bar.

    Getting both would run you upwards of $50 which I think is money very well spent. Aside from that, use a book-bag with books or plate weights for additional resistance, and read about leverage in order to increase resistance in bodyweight training WITHOUT having to add weight (ie: regular push-up too easy? elevate your feet)

    would also highly recommend building a sandbag or simply buying a 50lb bag of sand from Home Depot for $5 (but breaking up the sand into smaller bags and throwing those in a duffle bag is much more challenging than just using the packed sand, it's the motion of the sand that makes sandbag training so fun/engaging) for squats, thursters, overhead presses, etc.

    good resources:

    books:
    Never Gymless // Ultimate Training for the Ultimate Warrior - Ross Enamait (hit me up for a PDF of 'ultimate warrior')
    Convict Conditioning - Paul Wade

    websites:
    Al Kavadlo – We're Working Out! (convict conditioning 2 model)
    Beast Skills (convict conditioning 1 model)
    Gymnastic Strength Training - Gymnastics Exercises (just a great community)
    Sandbag Fitness (free e-book)

  4. #4
    Mickie's Avatar
    Mickie is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    7
    thanks guys! i appreciate the advice! going to start looking on amazon and purchase those. thanks again!

  5. #5
    jfreaksho's Avatar
    jfreaksho is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,962
    That was a really good post, iniQuity.

  6. #6
    iniQuity's Avatar
    iniQuity is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    5,683
    Quote Originally Posted by jfreaksho View Post
    That was a really good post, iniQuity.
    Thanks, during winter I also train almost exclusively at home, so I guess I've had some time to experiment. I also love DIY workout equipment, here's a few more things I forgot about...

    - Tuck-jumps: For conditioning work when you can't/don't want to brave the weather and sprint, these are fantastic. Start in a low squat and jump up explosively, bring your knees to your chest as if you were to cannonball into a pool, as come down don't land standing up but rather absorb the impact by squatting again and jump up explosively one more time. 3 sets of 10 is a good starting point, it's awesome for your quads and will get your heart racing. I don't train with kettlebells, and I'm not really crazy about burpees, so this is what I do mostly. It can certainly be combined with burpees to make them more explosive.

    - Bed sheet, towels, rope etc over your pull-up bar. These can be used to work grip strength and to do things you can't really do with a door-frame bar such as tricep extensions (unless you get the adjustable straight bar), inverted rows/Australian pull-ups, flyes, etc. Towel pull ups are awesome for the entire upper body, do them slow and feel the pain. For jiu-jitsu players (i'm a beginner) this type of grip work is great. I've gotten compliments on my grip strength at the gym. I don't know dick about BJJ yet, but I never let go of a hold once I have it. I have started hanging my gi (kimono) from my bar and doing pull ups on it too, it's brutal but very important.

    - Rings, either build your own or buy a set (I think these are such a great tool that it justifies a purchase of upwards of $80 for a good pair) everything is intensified by these. I could barely do a few dips on these at first, even though I could easily do 15+ on regular parallel bars or dip stations. Also practicing planche and front/back lever progressions on these is much more challenging than on anything else.

    I think that's all I got. This winter I'll mostly workout outside to do deadlifts and other stuff that requires a barbell.

  7. #7
    Derrick89's Avatar
    Derrick89 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6
    "Bed sheet, towels, rope etc over your pull-up bar".
    Can you elaborate it. I mean, I'm a newbie and don't have necessary stuff. So, if you could
    me.
    regards

  8. #8
    iniQuity's Avatar
    iniQuity is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    5,683
    Quote Originally Posted by Derrick89 View Post
    "Bed sheet, towels, rope etc over your pull-up bar".
    Can you elaborate it. I mean, I'm a newbie and don't have necessary stuff. So, if you could
    me.
    regards
    I hope you're a real person Derrick (so many fake bot accounts lately...)

    Grab a towel and roll it up longways so that it resembles a rope, throw it over your bar and do pull ups/tricep extensions, etc using the "handles"

    Same thing applies to the bedsheet, but the sheet allows you to get deeper into things such as tricep extensions, which makes the exercise much harder.

    I made this crappy video for the "Worldwide Pull Up" thread on this site, it's shitty but it explains how to use the sheet and stuff. Keep in mind this video was made with beginners in mind, and most of the people on the thread I mentioned are women looking to achieve their first pull up.

    Skip to 2:20


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •