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Thread: Crockpot - what do I do with it? page

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    Corvidae's Avatar
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    Crockpot - what do I do with it?

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    So last year (well before I went paleo) my mom basically made me take this old crockpot of hers. I didnt really know how to use it and wasnt a fan of stews in the past, so it gathered dust in the garage of the last two houses I lived. Now, though, times have changed, and as the weather gets colder I find myself perusing savory primal stew recipes and eyeing my ancient crock-pot skeptically.

    I assume that a crockpot is the same as a slow cooker? And can I REALLY just throw all the ingredients in and let it sit for hours on end? Can I leave it on when I go out or go to work? Any other interesting tips, tricks, or techniques?
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    Yep, a crockpot is a slow cooker.

    Some meats don't hold up too well to hours and hours of cooking.
    I make whole chickens, 'roasts' of various meats, stews, stocks and corned beef in my slow cooker. I've had more than one whole chicken go stringy because I cooked it for too long. They aren't quite the same texture as an oven cooked roast, but good enough.
    If you're making stews, I recommend browning the meat first, otherwise I've found the meat is a bit... meh.

    I've heard that some brands cook differently to others (higher temperatures or whatever), so you might want to keep an eye on it during your first use.

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    Dan208's Avatar
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    Yep, just throw stuff in.

    With something like chili, I know a lot of people that put the hamburger in raw, but I tried that once and didn't much care for it. I prefer to brown it first. Just tonight I made the chili recipe from The Primal Blueprint Cookbook, but instead of cooking it all in a pot, I browned the bacon and hamburger, threw in some onions, peppers and garlic, and then mixed that all with the spices and other ingredients in the slow cooker. I let that cook on high for a few hours, then turned it to low for another couple of hours. Turned out awesome.

    Try Googling slow cooker recipes or tips and I'm sure you'll find quite a bit of good stuff.

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    You put your meat in it. heh...heh...

    Seriously, just put a hunk of meat in it, some red wine, some chicken stock (preferably homemade), some carrots, celery, onions and a bay leaf and let it rock all day without you.

    Come home to the scrumptious aroma of a perfectly cooked tender batch of goo. Perfect food.

    Mine I can set for low and it cooks it up while I'm at work. As noted above, not all are equal and it is possible to overcook.

    ~rc

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    Brown a pork roast or tenderloin, put it in crockpot, dump in quartered potatoes, onion, a bunch of carrots. Throw in a bay leaf and whatever seasonings you like -- some garlic, whatever. Cook on low all day (or high for a couple hours and then low for couple hours). In the last hour add salt/pepper, any more seasonings, sauerkraut (if you like it). SO EASY, so good, and so primal.

    You can get way more creative than that, but a roast is one of my favorite crockpot meals, as is a whole chicken -- rinse and pat dry, rub with spices (dry), cook on low for about 6 hours. Do not add any liquid or oil or anything. Chicken cooked like this is SOOO tasty, easy, and NOT messy (like it is in the oven).

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    or you could always just mail it to me....
    Trying a journal. We'll see how long that lasts....

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    Goldstar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angieh View Post
    Brown a pork roast or tenderloin, put it in crockpot, dump in quartered potatoes, onion, a bunch of carrots. Throw in a bay leaf and whatever seasonings you like -- some garlic, whatever. Cook on low all day (or high for a couple hours and then low for couple hours). In the last hour add salt/pepper, any more seasonings, sauerkraut (if you like it). SO EASY, so good, and so primal.

    You can get way more creative than that, but a roast is one of my favorite crockpot meals, as is a whole chicken -- rinse and pat dry, rub with spices (dry), cook on low for about 6 hours. Do not add any liquid or oil or anything. Chicken cooked like this is SOOO tasty, easy, and NOT messy (like it is in the oven).
    These are awesome ideas, Angieh. I like simple. Seriously? I can put a chicken in without any liquid and just cook it dry? If I put big chunks of carrots underneath would that work with the same cooking time or do carrots take longer? What spices do you rec for the chicken, maybe poultry seasoning or rosemary?

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    Seriously, a crockpot is a Blueprinter's BFF! Its possibilities are limitless.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldstar View Post
    These are awesome ideas, Angieh. I like simple. Seriously? I can put a chicken in without any liquid and just cook it dry? If I put big chunks of carrots underneath would that work with the same cooking time or do carrots take longer? What spices do you rec for the chicken, maybe poultry seasoning or rosemary?
    Here is almost exactly what I do with the chicken, except I do buy a free range one from Trader Joe's, and I rub the old gal all over with spices. I think my spice mix is a little different every time. I get a small bowl and put some shakes of garlic, thyme (I like on chicken), paprika, sometimes oregano, or whatever really. And yes, NO liquid. The crockpot will be about half full of liquid when it's done. My husband is kind enough to pick it all off the bone -- we eat a big portion with vegetables for first meal, and then after that I use it for chicken salad (homemade mayo if I have it prepared), put it in salads, take it as leftovers to work for lunch, etc. SO GOOD AND EASY. I discovered this only in the last year ago and can't believe I didn't know how to do it before. I made some very messy roast chickens in the ovens, turning it up high to try to crisp the skin, etc. This is WAY easier, at least for me.

    I do make the broth too, but I store it in mason jars (I am funny about using plastic). I don't fill them too full because I freeze them for use in later cooking.

    Oh, and if you added carrots or other vegetables, I think the cooking time would be the same. If I am more rushed, do high for couple hours and then low for 2 or so. Same as low for 6-7 hours.
    Last edited by Angieh; 10-27-2011 at 07:38 PM.

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    I prefer a whole chicken roasted, so I haven't done that in my crockpot, but it is awesome for big, cheap cuts of meat like chuck roast. Lately we've been on a Mexican kick, and I'll roast and peel various chilies and throw those in along with onion, tomatillos, garlic, and maybe some cilantro. Mushrooms and onions are always good, too, for a more traditional sort of pot roast. This site isn't primal, but many of her recipes work for the primal crock pot: A Year of Slow Cooking
    My Primal Journal with lots of food pr0n

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