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Thread: Cold weather = faster exhaustion?

  1. #11
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    I actually think the cold makes exercise easier. So much of the circulatory system is used in cooling off the body and shedding heat generated by the mucscles. That being said, it's much easier to shed heat when it's 50F or 20F or colder with low humidity than it is when it's 85F and high humidity. Heart rate will be lower even with much harder effort than when it's hot and humid.

  2. #12
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    Last edited by Chapstick; 11-13-2011 at 08:42 AM.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chapstick View Post
    No. Hemoglobin releases more oxygen in higher temperatures, and less oxygen in colder temperatures. In cold temperatures, your muscles aren't getting enough oxygen, so your heart rate increases to compensate.
    I still don't get it. Maybe it's the activity. I've got 6-years of personal heart rate data logged. Same thing every year. It gets colder, my average run pace gets faster and my average heart rate for the workout is lower. It get's hot with humidity, I run slower and the heart rate is higher.

  4. #14
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    Last edited by Chapstick; 11-13-2011 at 08:43 AM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Texas
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    I usually will wear pullover sweater/jacket with sweat pants...apply some tigerbalm or woodlock to warm up the muscles and tendons...when I'm about to break a sweat, then I go out to train.

    This seems to help me.
    Primal (2013)
    Locavore (locally grown foods when possible)
    Training consists of Muay Thai, BJJ, weight training, and mountain biking

    Would like to be in good shape by my 36th Birthday (07-07-2013)

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chapstick View Post
    No. Hemoglobin releases more oxygen in higher temperatures, and less oxygen in colder temperatures. In cold temperatures, your muscles aren't getting enough oxygen, so your heart rate increases to compensate.
    This is only true if your muscle temperature drops with air temperature. Once you have been exercising for more than a couple of minutes, your muscles are plenty warm. The fact that you can overheat while exercising even in freezing cold weather shows this pretty plainly. If your body is making so much heat that you have to work to dump it to the environment, you do not have a problem with cold hemoglobin, LOL.
    Today I will: Eat food, not poison. Plan for success, not settle for failure. Live my real life, not a virtual one. Move and grow, not sit and die.

    My Primal Journal

  7. #17
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    Last edited by Chapstick; 11-13-2011 at 08:43 AM.

  8. #18
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    Oct 2010
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    So does the body adapt?
    Steak, eggs, potatoes - fruits, nuts, berries and forage. Coconut milk and potent herbs and spices. Tea instead of coffee now and teeny amounts of kelp daily. Let's see how this does! Not really had dairy much, and gut seems better for it.

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