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Thread: freeweight squat question page 3

  1. #21
    adamm's Avatar
    adamm is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekron View Post
    Just do Deadlifts with the heavy weights and do some of the 10000 sandbag/dumbbell/bodyweight squats posted here before.

    €: And i have never seen anyone do classic compound lifts superslow. Everyone who ever used this slow stuff effectively was using machines for it (and was pumped with all the joys of modern pharmacy anyway).
    Interesting. I mean, I'm certainly no top athlete, but the slow stuff has given me measurable benefit in gardening, sport (ok, just hiking, karate and baseball - with occasional pickup soccer) and muscle mass. Whether it continues to do so or stops working after a while remains to be seen. If I ever feel like I stop making good games, I'm sure I'll try something else.

    As for the benefits of modern pharmacy, I don't even take protein powder. I'm also allergic to machines, so do body weight or free weight exercises only.

    --Me

    P.S. Convinced wife to let me get a squat rack... Yay!!!

  2. #22
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    BSW
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    Slow lifts can make you stronger.

    In martial arts, we say to train the way you fight. Lifting is the same way. Lifting slow and making gains still makes you stronger. It won't develop your fast twitch muscle though, which is the stronger fiber. Consider mixing it up.

    You will definately need a squat rack.

    And you are right, you do not need whey, but if you want to get to posting HUGE numbers one day, you will either eat a tonne of real food, or concentrated protein like whey. Both will work. Many power lifters go for raw milk in great volume if they can get it. So do bodybuilders.

    Another aspect of squatting not often appreciated is that it is largely skill based. A lot of it is learning to deal with that heavy load. High reps at a lower but challenging weight can also help. Also variety and use of overhead squats will help your core adjust. This will be important when you hit bigger numbers.

    Do not stick to "one way to squat" and "one speed to do it", the body thrives on a bit of variety.

    All the best and good luck!
    Original wt: 375, Current, 246
    Total weight lost, 130 pounds (Took 2 years)
    Weight lost first week of low carb, 7.1 pounds
    Current: Deadlift 450, Bench 255, Squat 365, Run 4 miles daily, boxing and conditioning work
    Goals: Deadlift 502 (5 plates a side with bar), Bench 312 (3 plates/bar) squat 402 (4 plates/bar), run 10 miles, bw 200 lbs
    Cows have 4 stomachs to make grass digestible, we have one stomach to make cows digestible, and with that, neither can eat grain and become healthy!

  3. #23
    adamm's Avatar
    adamm is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfarny View Post
    ...[snip]...
    Since you weren't doing any squats at the start,and can't provide numbers, I have to assume that all the gains you've achieved via this method could have also been achieved via a standard method - my first month of real squatting, my squat went up by 50 lb. That's the novice effect at work.

    Coach, if you can clean and press a 90kg sandbag, you are pretty far ahead of the rest of us! Well done.
    Well, that isn't quite accurate. I saw measurable gains in pushups, pullups/chinups, and shoulder presses which I had been doing prior to this Slow Burn method, so no newbie effect there. Only the squats were new exercises added to my repertoire, and those, yes, would obviously improve due to the newbie regardless of what I did.

    Quote Originally Posted by BSW View Post
    And you are right, you do not need whey, but if you want to get to posting HUGE numbers one day, you will either eat a tonne of real food, or concentrated protein like whey.
    As for BSW's comment, well, I'm certainly not trying to be a power lifter or competitor. I'm hacking my exercise program. How can I minimalize effort and maximize gains. I have a job, a wife, kids, etc. Obviously I enjoy being fit, the family goes for 5k walks 4+ times a week, I like hiking, play karate, etc. But lift for its own sake? No thanks

    --Me

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