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Thread: SuperSlow training quesiton page 2

  1. #11
    szorn's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by dado View Post
    This is interesting. Time under tension, a new world for me now.

    Tell me, when I squat deep, how many seconds should my rep take?

    40-70 seconds for size/strength, does this mean an entire set of squats should take between 40-70 seconds?
    The rep speed can vary but if you want to follow a standard superslow program the rep speed would be 10/5 or 10/10. I prefer a 10/5 tempo as this was the original superslow tempo that has been providing results for well over 25-30 years. The original 10/5 was a 10 second positive (lifting) phase followed by a 5 second negative (lowering) phase.

    The TUT for the lower body is generally around 90 seconds. So, one set should last about 90 seconds before hitting muscle failure. That would be 6 reps at 15 seconds each.


    Steve

  2. #12
    szorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado View Post
    Wow my mind is blown. I might be doing my squats a little too fast. Where can I find more information about this subject? I will go through Starting Strength and Beyond Brawn again to see if there is any mention.
    Starting Strength is against slow rep training. Beyond Brawn talks about controlled reps but doesn't go into the details of rep speed. Just perform an internet search for "time under tension" and "time under load" for more information. It is covered in various books on the subject. Some of the better ones include "A Practical Approach To Strength Training" by Matt Bryzycki, "Total Human: The Complete Strength Training System" by Craig Nybo, and "High Intensity Training" by John Philbin.

    Steve

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado View Post
    Wow my mind is blown. I might be doing my squats a little too fast. Where can I find more information about this subject? I will go through Starting Strength and Beyond Brawn again to see if there is any mention.
    You won't find any support for this in Starting Strength - super slow training isn't concerned with improving Barbell lifts.

  4. #14
    dado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach Palfrey View Post
    You won't find any support for this in Starting Strength - super slow training isn't concerned with improving Barbell lifts.
    yea i didn't think so.

    man, i was feeling so angry, but now i feel good again.

    beyond brawn mentions a pause test, that you can perform once every few weeks or so, where you pause at any point in the motion and hold it there, to see if you're up to it. if you can pause at any point, you are a good man.

  5. #15
    dado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by szorn View Post
    Starting Strength is against slow rep training. Beyond Brawn talks about controlled reps but doesn't go into the details of rep speed. Just perform an internet search for "time under tension" and "time under load" for more information. It is covered in various books on the subject. Some of the better ones include "A Practical Approach To Strength Training" by Matt Bryzycki, "Total Human: The Complete Strength Training System" by Craig Nybo, and "High Intensity Training" by John Philbin.

    Steve
    many thanks to you, steve

  6. #16
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    Just some food for thought... super slow works almost entirely your slow twitch muscle... (red muscle)

    IIRC high weight low rep works both slow and fast (white and red muscle) and has been proven superior. Not to mention the added stress of the weight to your bones to encourage them to become stronger in reaction to the stress.

    If you like slow workouts more and keep with it. But I do think high weight low reps is better.

    Sorry I do not have citation maybe someone else will. (I am recalling from my old powerlifting days) Also Dr.K loves high weight low rep lifting.

    Cheers.

  7. #17
    otzi's Avatar
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    Something I started recently that I like: I was doing BW exercises 3-4 days a week, several sets to failure, 2-3 times a day. Somedays that would mean 50+ chinups, 50+ pullups, 50+ dips, and 100+ pushups. I hit a wall after several months and couldn't increase numbers and was having recovery issues. I've now taken to doing BW once a week, super-slow movements and only 2 or 3 sets of 10 pulls/chins/dips, and 25 pushups. After a few weeks of this I added 5 pullups to my personal best and recovery not an issue.

  8. #18
    szorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glockin Grok View Post
    Just some food for thought... super slow works almost entirely your slow twitch muscle... (red muscle)

    IIRC high weight low rep works both slow and fast (white and red muscle) and has been proven superior. Not to mention the added stress of the weight to your bones to encourage them to become stronger in reaction to the stress.

    High weight / low rep training also has the greatest potential for injury. Not worth the risk for someone just interested in improving health, fitness, and general strength. Powerlifters assume the risks in order to compete but health-seekers shouldn't be pointed in that direction without being given all of the facts.


    Steve

  9. #19
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    you can always try slow cadence training with body weight exercises too. mark had this as a Workout of the Week sometime in the past year. i don't know that you necessarily need to try 10 second counts, but slow can do you a lot of good. you can easily try pushups, pull ups, squats, inverse rows and some ab work like reverse crunches or dragon flags (crazy hard to do slow i'd imagine). just try and do 5-10 pull ups at 5 seconds up and five seconds down, and see how sore your lats are for the next couple of days.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by szorn View Post
    High weight / low rep training also has the greatest potential for injury. Not worth the risk for me

    Steve
    fixed

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