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Thread: Is Intermittent Fasting appropriate for beginners? page 2

  1. #11
    gregandbeaker's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    I didn't do any IF until several months after starting a primal eating style. However, I can say without a doubt that IF put the final nails in the coffin of my lifelong food addiction. Once you learn you don't *have* to eat, making the right choices becomes infinitely easier.


  2. #12
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    Hi Jokaman,


    Some quick and dirty information about IF:


    - More frequent, smaller meals do not increase metabolism or thermogenesis over fewer big meals a day of equal calories.


    - Studies show that Intermittent Fasting actually increases metabolism up to 48 hours and even up to 72 hours... contrary to popular belief. The mechanism responsible for this increase is likely the release of catecholamines, such as norepinephrine and growth hormones.


    - Catecholamines stimulate fat release from storage.


    - If you're new to fasting, the hormone ghrelin is released, which stimulates hunger, but only temporarily and dissipates after a few minutes. But after using IF for a period, the body seems to adapt and suppresses ghrelin.


    - IF helps to decrease insulin resistance and increase insulin sensitivity, thus improving nutrient uptake. This may trigger positive nutrient partitioning, where the calories you eat are shuttled to lean mass rather than fat mass.


    - IF does not necessarily cause hypoglycemia. The body has a robust system that prevents a drop in blood glucose -- it will first draw on stored glycogen to maintain blood glucose level, and, if needed, on stored protein (but this does not necessarily decrease long-term muscle mass because muscle mass is dependent on gene expression and average turnover balance, and not necessarily on acute protein turnover to meet immediate needs.)


    - IF may help you re-establish your recognition of true hunger, rather than being fooled by psychological and habitual hunger.


    - IF has been said to increase mental focus, and due to the release of catecholamines IF'ers may experience increased energy.


    - IF helps protect the brain by stimulating the release of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factors).


    - IF can have an appetite-suppression effect, despite occasional but transient hunger.


    - IF can free you of obsession about food, or of thoughts about when the next meal is coming in three hours. It can also free up time otherwise taken to prepare frequent meals and to eat frequently.


    I don't see why you shouldn't give IF a try, whether you have only 10 pounds to lose or 100. Having said this, IF may not be for everyone -- but you cannot deny the accumulation of research showing the many benefits of IF.


  3. #13
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    I've been doing daily 20 hour IF's (Warrior Diet style) and I'm looking to bulk up regardless of fat gains... So is IF suitable for bulking?

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  4. #14
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    Raphael,


    So long as the minimum calories are met to support basal metabolism and physical activities, and sufficient mechanical stress is applied to muscles, then you should experience hypertrophy, regardless of meal schedule.


    However, it may help to lift weight right before the end of a fast, and then consume your first meal after the workout. The increased insulin sensitivity induced by the fast may improve protein uptake and protein synthesis.


    But, according to some great info on Brad Pilon&#39;s blog, increased protein uptake does not necessarily result in more muscle mass.


    My recommendation, however, is that you still give IF a shot, making sure you eat sufficient calories within the feed window, and eat your first meal after a workout.


  5. #15
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    Yep, doing all that for two months and so far everything is great. I was just wondering if I was going the right direction. My calories are very high; in fact, I gained a lot of fat, but I don&#39;t care.


    Thanks.

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  6. #16
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    Lean Saloon, what advice would you give me? I workout first thing in the morning after a cup of black coffee. Afterward I don&#39;t eat, merely because I&#39;m not hungry. I usually eat late in the day, and sometimes even more towards the evening. I&#39;m trying to "balance" my body out by eating only when I&#39;m hungry. I find eating this way fairly easy, and not forced at all, but not sure what it would do. So far I&#39;ve lost a few inches off my waist, and my strength seems to be steadily increasing. Thoughts?


  7. #17
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    Hi Kaizen,


    I wouldn&#39;t worry too much about not eating after your morning workout to continue the fast. As I mentioned, while a post-workout meal may increase protein synthesis, it doesn&#39;t necessarily equate to increased muscle mass, as muscle mass has a lot to do with the overall protein turnover rate (or the balance of anabolism and catabolism) as influenced by gene expression induced by mechanical stress placed on the muscle from your workout, and by your genetics.


    Also, continuing the fast after your workout allows your body to enjoy a prolonged state of increased fat mobilization, especially helpful if you&#39;re seeking to lose some fat.


  8. #18
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    A bit technical for me, but thanks a lot for the info Lean saloon. Yes I&#39;m looking to lose some fat, I&#39;ll keep going this way until I can.


  9. #19
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    @The Lean Saloon


    What about eating 3,500 calories within 2 hours? Is that bad? Can your body process all that stuff? You seem to know a lot about this topic, I hope you can answer me.


    Thanks.

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  10. #20
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    Kaizen,


    Although the stomach does not "shrink," it is, however, highly elastic and rebounds to its naturally smaller size when there&#39;s no food content or blood flow for digestion. As such, it is generally difficult and downright uncomfortable to over-stuff yourself with food in one sitting.


    But in a 2-hour period, you can probably put down 3500 calories without much discomfort. Is this bad? As long as you don&#39;t chronically exceed your daily requirement (but that would mean you have an energy regulating impairment, which the Paleo Diet helps prevent or even repair), I don&#39;t see any reason why this is bad. The stomach content will simply take longer to digest.


    There are cultures that typically eat the majority of their food in one meal, and I&#39;ve known people who take their entire day&#39;s calories in one meal (a popular bodybuilder from the 80s also ate all of his calories in one single meal -- definitely ahead of his time).


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