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Thread: Not a newbie to MDA, but I haven't made the progress I want........ page 3

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
    It occurs to me that as a Marine, you were accustomed to thinking in terms of the enemy to be defeated. You also mentioned that competition with your peers for promotion was a motivator. In my view, when we make a bad choice it is not a failure of character -- it is a failure of motivation.

    If poor health is not a big enough enemy to motivate you, maybe I can share mine. I am an ex-scientist, having spent over 20 years studying and researching infectious diseases. I was not a nutritionist, but I had studied a ton of biochemistry and physiology, so I thought I understood what the CW was telling us about low-fat, high fiber diets. I bought it. And, because I was not an exercise fanatic, I gained weight progressively. Now, having gotten acquainted with Mark's books, Gary Taubes' books and having watched the Big Fat Fiasco videos on YouTube (all definitely recommended), I am mad as hell.

    I am mad at the scientific establishment and the Congressional committee led by McGovern (whom I liked, a lot) for setting the whole country on a grain-based diet. I am mad at how dissenting voices were muzzled. I am furious about being duped. I am thoroughly pissed off at myself for not exercising my own intelligence. I am angry that I continued on that lethal path for as long as I did. I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore!

    You want enemies to fight, I'll give you enemies! Every time you eat your comfort food, you are yielding to big Ag, to the USDA and to the whole medical-nutritional establishment that brought you the deadliest food pyramid they could imagine -- all based on BAD science. Those enemies have put the health of most North Americans in danger. They have shortened the expected lifespan of the younger generation. They have added a crushing load of obesity-associated diseases to the health care system.

    Your mission is to use your body as the battlefield, to prove that those enemies do not control you: you will not let them keep those dangerous pounds on your body; you will not let them reduce your quality of life; you will not let them shorten that life. Every time you get up in the morning, eat a high-protein, high-fat, high-veggie breakfast, you're striking back. Every time you take a walk during your lunch hour, you're plotting strategy. Every time you stick to the Primal Fitness approach, you're building tactical strength.

    You win this battle and the people around you will take notice. They will ask you how you did it. And you will tell them about the enemies and how to vanquish them!



    ....I'm printing this out and sticking it on my mirror.

    BUT WHAT DO I DO THE THE JELLY IN THE FRIDGE NOW? D=
    Bunny trainer extraordinaire!

  2. #22
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    Love the signature.

    Flush the jelly.

  3. #23
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    Thanks!!

    Thanks all for the support and motivation, esp. the post by Northern Light. Very good and helpful. I do look at it as a personal battle and extreme failure on my part when I can't stick with the master plan. It is good to be motivated, but part of my self-destruction is being so hard on myself when things don't work out. tfarny said that successful athletes are blind to their mistakes. I think it is more like they don't dwell on mistakes to the point of self-destruction. An NFL receiver drops a pass in the end zone. He immediately feels disappointment, regret, shame, anger, etc., but he doesn't drop the rest of the passes because he failed. He uses the dropped pass as motivation to push on and get that touchdown. My problem is I drop passes on purpose out of disgust. Reading other's posts and writing my own is helping me think about these things and getting my mind straight. I need to get healthy and bounce back. Maybe the biggest thing I can change to do that is to take a chil pill and forget about yesterday and focus on today.

    Thanks again everyone!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 152 Sumo View Post
    My problem is I drop passes on purpose out of disgust.
    Disgust with what? Not yourself, I hope. You're here and you're trying, which is lightyears ahead of most folk! We're up against some powerful forces here and we are only human.

    Focus your anger and disgust outward, not inward. And soon enough you will start feeling the rewards of being primal. They did not take long for me -- more energy, less hunger (skipping meals because I do not even think about food for hours at a time), better sleep, more fun -- and I get to enjoy food that I have deprived myself of for years!

    It is not a promotion, but it is a clear sign that you are freeing yourself from decades of brainwashing and regaining control over your health. I swear I am a happier person today than I was a week ago! I am a true carb lover, historically, but now that I know what they have been doing to me (and who told me to eat them in the first place), I am happy to put them in my past in exchange for bacon and cream!

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 152 Sumo View Post
    Thanks all for the support and motivation, esp. the post by Northern Light. Very good and helpful. I do look at it as a personal battle and extreme failure on my part when I can't stick with the master plan. It is good to be motivated, but part of my self-destruction is being so hard on myself when things don't work out. tfarny said that successful athletes are blind to their mistakes. I think it is more like they don't dwell on mistakes to the point of self-destruction. An NFL receiver drops a pass in the end zone. He immediately feels disappointment, regret, shame, anger, etc., but he doesn't drop the rest of the passes because he failed. He uses the dropped pass as motivation to push on and get that touchdown. My problem is I drop passes on purpose out of disgust. Reading other's posts and writing my own is helping me think about these things and getting my mind straight. I need to get healthy and bounce back. Maybe the biggest thing I can change to do that is to take a chil pill and forget about yesterday and focus on today.

    Thanks again everyone!!
    What I'm trying to say is, don't make it such an emotional rollercoaster thing - so you eat some french fries, so what? Welcome to America. Forget about it because the next meal is a new set of choices to make. The whole emotional eating thing is a double-edged sword and it seems to cut a lot of people even when they are trying to eat well.
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfarny View Post
    What I'm trying to say is, don't make it such an emotional rollercoaster thing - so you eat some french fries, so what? Welcome to America. Forget about it because the next meal is a new set of choices to make. The whole emotional eating thing is a double-edged sword and it seems to cut a lot of people even when they are trying to eat well.
    I was agreeing with you in an off way. Double-edged sword is right. Comfort foods are usually the wrong ones to eat. But, like Mark posts about sometimes, it is healthy and beneficial to cheat a little sometimes (80% rule). My problem is that when I cheat, I cheat bad, then get down on myself and cheat more. That's what I meant about dropping passes out of disgust. I get disappointed and stressful. Stress makes me want to eat comfort foods. While buying/ordering the comfort foods, I consciously realize that it is bad and I will regret it in a couple hours, but still do it. I think that means that I have an addiction. The good thing is that I am still trending in the right direction, it is only taking me longer than I originally planned. Around the new year, I was 250 lbs. I am 225 now. I was hoping to be closer to 200 by now. Not the end of the world, I know, I just lost some momentum and realized that my bad habits run deep.

  7. #27
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    Hey, we could be twins ... or BFFS ... or something like that. We could start a self-destructive support group.

    My deal is, I know exactly -- for the most part -- why I fall off the wagon. I can even see it coming. And yet, I seem to be powerless to stop it. And I don't mean that as a cop out. "Oh, poor privileged American white woman can't stop eating too much." But the cravings and emotional hunger seem to take on a life of their own. And there's no journaling or enough walks around the block that can stop it.

  8. #28
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    Life is so much better now that I've discovered I'm imperfect. Funny thing is, I realized all of the people around me are too, so I'm not competing with them to be perfect either.

    Makes it much easier to accept mistakes (my own and those of others) and move on without beating myself up.
    My sorely neglected blog - http://ThatWriterBroad.com

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by 152 Sumo View Post
    I think that means that I have an addiction. ... realized that my bad habits run deep.
    This may sounds harsh, but only because I've had to deal with it myself. Don't tell yourself you have an addiction to whatever comfort foods. You are setting yourself up for failure. You will end up eating whatever it is and tell yourself that you couldn't help it, AND you'll feel like crap about it, stress out, then do it again in a vicious cycle, feeling helpless.

    Give yourself the option to have some freedom. Put yourself in CONTROL. Let yourself eat that bowl of ice cream, or get a small fry in the drive thru. Whatever it is, just eat it (a small portion, hopefully, and not vomit-inducing portions), be happy that you've satisfied the craving, then get back on track.

    I am recording my food intake daily on FitDay. Do you know that I've had to audacity to LIE to MYSELF about what I've eaten so that I can feel good about staying at a certain number of carbs? All I did was screw myself over for a week, while I pigged out on homemade applesauce. It might sound silly, but yeah, homemade applesauce (6 servings in a day!). I stopped recording my food that week because I didn't want to be honest with myself about it. And everything stalled. All my other foods were still the way they should be, and really, the applesauce wasn't going to hurt me.

    You know what? I looked myself in the mirror, realized that I was starting down the same trend I've done before whenever I tried to change my eating, and snapped out of it. I try to stay between 50-80 carbs per day. But you know what? If I feel like crap and I want a bowl of that yummy coconut chocolate So Delicious ice cream (40g carbs for 8oz!), or I want to eat the ENTIRE mango (33g carbs!) AND an apple (20 more!) one day, then you know what, I'm going to ask myself if I REALLY want it, and if I do, then I'm going to eat it. Eating 100 (or even 120!) grams carbs that day isn't going to kill me. Yeah, I'll be off track on my 50-80 goal, but the next day you can be damned sure that I'm going to stick to it.

    It's okay to have an off day. Set your goal, stick to it as much as you can, and give yourself the OPTION of a 20% non-primal or over-indulgent snack or meal, say twice a week. Work it down to one if you want. And don't beat yourself up about it! Just accept it and move on. I might sprint a little harder the next day, or lift a bit more when I'm lifting heavy things (myself!), but I have come to realise that if you make yourself feel helpless, you're going to fail. And it'll be your own little secret, and then you'll start asking why it's happening, and find an excuse somewhere.

    Bottom line is: YOU are in control. Don't make yourself helpless and set yourself up for failure. If you do that, you WILL fail. You do NOT have to be perfect.

    Love yourself, smile, and be happy when you look in the mirror each day.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfarny View Post
    You know, I think it's a good idea to forget about the whole "on track / off track" bandwagon thing and just take life for what it is - one damn choice after another. Make solid choices for the most part, and don't let a bad choice (cookies) become an excuse for a second bad choice (laying around all day). Don't get too high or too low. The best athletes are TOTALLY blind to their mistakes - quarterbacks will throw a boneheaded interception that nearly costs the game, then the next play they get out there and throw another tough pass - it's a new possession, gotta score. Getting sacked last time is no excuse for rushing your reads the next time. Gotta go, some good games on today....good luck.
    exactly.

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