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Thread: RE: Diet impacts gut flora page

  1. #1
    jammies's Avatar
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    RE: Diet impacts gut flora

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    I saw this paper today and thought it was pretty interesting. A great deal of our health, in particular immune health, is dependent upon the gut microbiota. This study shows that the macronutrient ratio in your diet has a very large and pretty rapid impact on which bacteria thrive in the gut. They did not have any data to say one way was better than another, but they indicate that would be an important future study.


    ABSTRACT

    Diet strongly affects human health, partly by modulating gut microbiome composition. We used diet inventories and 16S rDNA sequencing to characterize fecal samples from 98 individuals. Fecal communities clustered into enterotypes distinguished primarily by levels of Bacteroides and Prevotella. Enterotypes were strongly associated with long-term diets, particularly protein and animal fat (Bacteroides) versus carbohydrates (Prevotella). A controlled-feeding study of 10 subjects showed that microbiome composition changed detectably within 24 hours of initiating a high-fat/low-fiber or low-fat/high-fiber diet, but that enterotype identity remained stable during the 10-day study. Thus, alternative enterotype states are associated with long-term diet.

    Published Online September 1 2011
    Science 7 October 2011:
    Vol. 334 no. 6052 pp. 105-108
    DOI: 10.1126/science.1208344
    REPORT
    Linking Long-Term Dietary Patterns with Gut Microbial Enterotypes
    Gary D. Wu1,*, Jun Chen2,3, Christian Hoffmann4,5, Kyle Bittinger4, Ying-Yu Chen1, Sue A. Keilbaugh1, Meenakshi Bewtra1,2, Dan Knights6, William A. Walters7, Rob Knight8,9, Rohini Sinha4, Erin Gilroy2, Kernika Gupta10, Robert Baldassano10, Lisa Nessel2, Hongzhe Li2,3, Frederic D. Bushman4,*, James D. Lewis1,2,3,*
    + Author Affiliations

    1Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
    2Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
    3Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
    4Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
    5Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás Goiania, GO, 74001-970, Brazil.
    6Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
    7Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
    8Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
    9Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
    10Division of Gastroenterology, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
    *To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: gdwu@mail.med.upenn.edu (G.D.W.); lewisjd@mail.med.upenn.edu (J.D.L.); bushman@mail.med.upenn.edu (F.D.B.)

  2. #2
    Ferti's Avatar
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    I was writing a paper for a biology class about gut bacteria, which made me think about what to eat to make my gut happy which brought me to GAPS and then to Paleo/Primal. Really interesting stuff.

  3. #3
    jammies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ferti View Post
    I was writing a paper for a biology class about gut bacteria, which made me think about what to eat to make my gut happy which brought me to GAPS and then to Paleo/Primal. Really interesting stuff.
    It is really a very hot topic in the world of immunology right now. It looks like some very important immune cells actually go to the gut to be "educated" as to how they should behave in the rest of the body. The resident bacteria there are a critical part of determining how the cells are educated.

    I think many people have problems with digestion or bloating for years before larger health issues hit. I know I had serious GI issues for a decade before I got severe rheumatoid arthritis. Sometimes I think if I had found a primal diet and stopped all the gut inflammation earlier I would have avoided a LOT of pain and suffering.

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