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Thread: Thoughtful reviews of "Wheat Belly" page 3

  1. #21
    teach2183's Avatar
    teach2183 is offline Senior Member
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    I read Wheat Belly, dumped wheat, and then found PB. I was active on the WB facebook page for a while but started to feel it was too narrow a focus (everyone should severely limit carbs) and Davis was getting to extreme. I can see the conspiracy theory, but he's getting too into that for my liking. I've found PB to be a much more well-rounded idea and lifestyle.

  2. #22
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    Crabbcakes is offline Senior Member
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    I read Wheat Belly as well. I wasn't aware of the whole modern hybrid wheat thing, so for this nugget of information alone, it was worth reading. I got my copy from the library.

    I have a celiac daughter AND a daughter who has been all-grain-free for 6 years now, so he was really preaching to the choir in a way (in my case), but I had never thought to extend the ditch-the-grains thing to myself. The book was worth reading for this aspect as well.

    Like another poster related, I too found Primal soon after Wheat Belly. For folks who cannot see through the SAD (and how long ago was it that many of us were Something Else as far as diet went?) the popularity of the book breaks the ice in a major way re grains / wheat. I'll take that, too.

    In many cases, I would recommend it further. Now, if you are already living Primal well, heavy into Paleo studies, etc., I would not - it would be like giving a middle-school text to a college student. But at this point in time, how many are we (Primal or Primal-and-heavy-into-studies)? Certainly not the majority as far as all WOE's are concerned. Any resource that points to a better direction can be useful.

  3. #23
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    I read `Wheat Belly`and it led me to `The Food Lover`s Make it Paleo`cookbook and that indirectly introduced me to PB, I loved the foreword by Mark Sisson.

    I did enjoy `Wheat Belly`even though at times I found Dr. Davis banging me over the head about why wheat is bad but it did convince me to look further into this new way of living. I credit the cookbook however for convincing my husband to also switch over and our children are all for giving it a go, they love that bacon and steak are the new staples in their diet

    I would loan the book to friends who are interested in learning why carbs are not good for us but I would also send them to this site to learn more about the primal lifestyle.

  4. #24
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    Two things about "Wheat Belly":

    1. Yes it can be a stepping stone to "greater things." I read it. Then looked around and read "Everday Paleo" and then the "Primal Blueprint."

    2. Dr. Davis does a FANTASTIC job of explaining diabetes. He did it FAR better than I learned in nursing school. Even then I knew there was something wrong with what we were being taught. I was getting steadily fatter in nursing school and was STILL alarmed by the amount of processed food and carbs allowed on the ADA diet.

  5. #25
    EmeraldRose's Avatar
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    I have to admit, this book has been sitting on the shelf since shortly after I went primal. My mom purchased it for me to read, I think in reaction to my new lifestyle. I haven't read it, as it is so much more for me than just not eating wheat.

    Even after all the progress I've made since April, my mom still keeps asking me if I've read that book. I haven't got the heart to tell her I don't need to...
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    Starting: 207lbs | Current: 176lbs | Mini-goal: 172lbs | Ultimate Goal: 130lbs


  6. #26
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    He's a bit of a one trick pony like Dr. Lustig and sugar. At least Davis has addressed his own underlying issues with his own advice unlike Lustig who could stand to lose at least 50#'s.

    I also have but did not read the book. A central premise in his blog however is that the most effective tool for weight loss is a glucose meter and self testing even absent diabetes. On balance I think following his advice would be better than any conventional wisdom.
    Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

  7. #27
    Neckhammer's Avatar
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    I enjoyed the book. And neither of them are "one trick pony's". Just cause you are unfamiliar with their other work doesn't mean that they do nothing else but sit back and rake in the revenue from one book and one famous youtube lecture.

    I think there are plenty of places where you could pick at it, but the premise is correct.

  8. #28
    IvyBlue's Avatar
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    I actually got a chance to question Dr. Lustig at the Tedx kickoff to his anti-sugar tax and control crusade and he does not want to even acknowledge the holistic approach or effectiveness of paleo (or anything else for that matter judging by his response to other questioners) and in fact dismissed it out of hand. I can't speak to the body of his published work but publicly it's sugar, sugar, sugar.
    Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

  9. #29
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    I read the book, joined the TrackYourPlaque program and posted on their forum a few times. Overall, its not bad, and most of what the book states is parallel to primal life.

    What I didn't like though is the dogma, in the book, on the blog, and on the forum. "Wheat is bad and will kill you." "All carbs are bad and lead to glycation and cardiovascular disease." Really? Do carbs have the same effect on Usain Bolt after 4 hours of sprint training as the same amount of carbs on a 400 pound couch potato? Of course not. For one, Usain Bolt would be carb depleted. And that's one thing I particularly disagree with in the book.

    Dr. Davis asserts that wheat (and all carbs, but especially wheat) convert into triglycerides through DNL (de novo lipogenesis). These trigs then lead to small particle LDL's which are the direct cause of arterial plaque. Ok, that sounds good to me. He concludes therefore, that to prevent plaque, cut the wheat and all the carbs. For most of his patients, especially elderly on heart meds, or very obese people, the discussion ends there and I can understand why that's his message.

    However, they're missing something. In athletic individuals, DNL never happens. (The athlete would need to be glycogen full for several days before DNL would begin.) Ok, maybe this applies to a miniscule percent of the population--like males under 12% bodyfat. That's still an important distinction. The enemy isn't carbs per se--its DNL. And atheletes who are constantly depleting don't have to be afraid of carbs.

    The trackyourplaque program rather focuses on a simple straightforward message of no wheat. After spending all that time evaluating what they had to offer, I've concluded most of it didn't apply to me at my level of fitness (I'm at 10% bodyfat, primal 90/10, Leangains IF).

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