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Thread: Giving Blood? Paleo/beneficial? page

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    Primal Fuel


    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/fashion/10caveman.html?ref=style


    This was an excellent article. Nothing really new to me except the blood donation reference. Putting aside the social benefits of regularly donating blood, and the cool philosophical nexus with Paleo ("Grok got cuts and bled now and then"), are there any health benefits to someone giving blood?


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    I don't think I buy the "Grok got cuts" argument. You don't lose a pint of blood from minor cuts. With injuries serious enough to result in the loss of a pint of blood, I want to know (1) what stopped the bleeding? and (2) how did he keep the wound clean enough to avoid bacterial infection?


    The fairly common genetic disease hereditary hemochromatosis (iron overload) is treated via blood letting, but I've not heard of any other health reason for blood donation. So if your hemoglobin is consistently on the high side, along with your ferritin, regular blood donation might be prudent.


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    Eades wrote in "the 6 week cure for the middle-aged middle" something about giving blood: It might be beneficial if you lost much weight. Fat cells store toxins and when you are on a diet the fat cells will release them. So giving blood will reduce the amount of toxins in your body.

    I don't have the book at my fingertips to look it up at the moment.


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    And it seems Drs Eades mentioned on the Protein Power blog, that donating blood under a fasted state also puts more fat-stored toxins into the blood stream to be removed with a blood donation. Heck, a pint weighs a pound, so that is a pretty significant amount of material being lost!


    Not so sure if this is based on a real common Paleo issue, or just tweaking modern availability of blood donation to our advantage (and if it is?)


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    Thanks for the quick and informative tips.


    Here's a result I found from Dr. Eades who gives blood every 8 weeks due to iron consumption concerns (apparently): http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/uncategorized/low-carb-diets-and-copper/


    "If you’re worried about the iron, do as MD and I do and donate blood every couple of months.


    Cheers–


    MRE"


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    I was able to read the bit on blood donation via Amazon's Look Inside Now feature.


    Maybe someone who has the book could check the references, but he doesn't provide any concrete detail about these toxins and how long they're normally expected to hang out in your plasma. So I'm skeptical.


    And I don't care how he justifies it; donating blood when I believe my plasma to be at its most toxic is unethical. :-(


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    And I don&#39;t care how he justifies it; donating blood when I believe my plasma to be at its most toxic is unethical. :-( </blockquote>


    I don&#39;t know where you come from, but in my country they never have enough blood donations. So the few toxins are not really that harmful to a person who would die without the blood. And by the way: Every donation had been analyzed before they use them.


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    I am from the US. Blood shortages here are not rare, but the blood supply is rarely critically low.


    If you feel bad about a scarcity of blood, then go donate when you are at your healthiest! Why would you choose to perform an act of charity when you know your blood is at its least healthy and you also know that the intended recipient is at his/her most vulnerable?


    And by the way, they are not screening the blood for the toxins Eades refers to. They&#39;re screening it for blood-borne pathogens.


    Edited to add: as Eades mentions in his book, phlebotomy can be performed by your physician. In that case the blood would be discarded rather than donated. So if you&#39;re planning to load up your plasma with toxins and want to get rid of them, an ethical approach would be to arrange for phlebotomy. And if your conscience pricks you for throwing away blood, go and donate a couple months later when you&#39;re healthy.


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    Maybe you&#39;re right...


    Otherwise: What is right benchmark for healthy blood? Do I have to compare it with my blood when I&#39;m at the peak of my health or just with my average blood when I am not sick? Or should I compare it with the blood of the intended recipient? Or should I compare it with the blood of the average human?

    And if toxins in the blood are a problem for the recipient the screening would include this too, wouldn&#39;t it?


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    Intention is important. If your primary reason for donating blood at a given time is to rid your body of toxins, think again. Schedule an in-office phlebotomy session instead. If you believe those toxins to be harmful to your body, why would you deliberately give them to someone who is in much worse health than you?


    "And if toxins in the blood are a problem for the recipient the screening would include this too, wouldn&#39;t it?"


    So you are suggesting these toxins are not harmful? Then why would you give blood to rid yourself of them? Conventional medicine does not recognize a lot of things as harmful. Should you also eat whole grains and vegetable oils, simply because conventional medicine says they&#39;re fine for you? Of course not.


    Same with the alleged fat-derived toxins in your blood. If you believe they&#39;re harmful, then it is unethical to deliberately give yours to someone who is in poor enough health to need a transfusion.


    As the saying goes, when you know better, you do better. Just wait until you believe your blood to be squeaky clean and healthy, and THEN donate.


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