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    hbmcracer's Avatar
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    The Future of Food

    Primal Fuel
    I just watched this documentary on genetically modified crops:

    The Future of Food - YouTube

    What caught my interest is they seem to mention corn, rapeseed, wheat, and soybeans a lot. Makes me wonder if those crops aren't really bad for us, but the genetically modified ones are. Is this why the Primal Blueprint works so well for reversing diabetes, curing migraines, and just making us healthier?

    There was a researcher that was suspended for releasing his findings that rats fed genetically altered potatos had depressed immune systems, and another found that 40% of caterpillars died prematurely after being fed genetically modified corn.
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    non-GMO rapeseed is extremely toxic

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    There are some things that make industrial food sources worse:
    GMO may cross various plant lectins together (that is why the caterpillars died)
    Phosphorus rich fertilisers increase phytic acid
    Minerals striped from the soil due to intensive farming
    Increasing the total protein and gluten in wheat
    And who knows what effect destroying the microorganisms in the soil will have

    All of those foods are bad even without being GMO and industrially farmed: antinutrients, poor nutrient density and low bioavailibility, high PUFA, high omega 6

    and yes, the eruric acid (not uric acid) is in rapeseed and is toxic. Rapeseed has been turned in canola

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    Quote Originally Posted by hbmcracer View Post
    What caught my interest is they seem to mention corn, rapeseed, wheat, and soybeans a lot. Makes me wonder if those crops aren't really bad for us, but the genetically modified ones are.
    Corn, rapeseed, wheat and soybeans are mentioned repeatedly as they are the world's primary "commodity" crops, and the first generation of genetically modified traits were designed to appeal to the agriculture industry itself (better yields, reduced weeding costs, etc...)

    This is changing however...
    Quote Originally Posted by ib4student View Post
    non-GMO rapeseed is extremely toxic
    non-toxic varieties of rapeseed oil (AKA Canola) were developed using selective breeding techniques (not modern genetic engineering) decades ago, and are commonplace

    modern GMO varieties of canola also exist, and I've also read of both toxic and non-toxic GMO varieties with varying fatty acid ratios bred from rapeseed itself (the toxic eruric acid has industrial uses)
    Quote Originally Posted by Stevenhamley View Post
    Phosphorus rich fertilisers increase phytic acid
    Minerals striped from the soil due to intensive farming
    ...
    All of those foods are bad even without being GMO and industrially farmed: antinutrients, poor nutrient density and low bioavailibility, high PUFA, high omega 6
    You'd be surprised at the next wave of GMO crops. Some potentially interesting ones:

    GMO low-phytic acid barley & corn (improves phosphorus/calcium absorption when fed to livestock, reducing excess phosphorus in waste/runoff)
    GMO soybeans that produce omega 3s (SDA/EPA/DHA)
    GMO traits for nitrogen-fixing in various plants (like beans can, improving soil nitrogen)
    A whole slew of GMO oilseed plants with very interesting fatty acid compositions:

    High Oleic acid Soybean - high smoke point, low PUFA, low omega6, very stable, hydrogenation unneeded (still unavailable)
    High Oleic Canola - high smoke point, lower omega6 & ALA, very stable (this one's already in fryers in restaurants that switched to "trans fat free" formulas)
    High Stearic High Oleic Sunflower oil - pretty much all Oleic & Stearic acid, semi-solid at room temp (very new)

    Certainly not primal, but replacing hydrogenated oils with oils that are stable in an unprocessed form seem to have the opportunity to make the... crap? "normal" people eat slightly more nutritious
    Last edited by Fury; 10-04-2011 at 02:13 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fury View Post
    Certainly not primal, but replacing hydrogenated oils with oils that are stable in an unprocessed form seem to have the opportunity to make the... crap? "normal" people eat slightly more nutritious
    That's interesting...so you think the manufacturers of the veggie oils out there know their products are poison?
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    Catherine's Avatar
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    they make a product. They only care how much they sell and at what profit.

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    Wait, the government-subsidized crops are going to be around for a while? Who would have thunk?

    "It tobacco were spinach the government would have outlawed it years ago, and no one would have given a damn."

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    Meanwhile, studies are consistently showing that organic farming is better for the farmer and the environment; it is just more expensive for the consumer. Hopefully someday the rest of America will start looking at something beyond the price tag when purchasing food.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hbmcracer View Post
    That's interesting...so you think the manufacturers of the veggie oils out there know their products are poison?
    Yes, and no. I think "poison" is a bit strong, but oil manufacturers certainly are aware of the various shortcomings of their products (poor shelf life, rancidity, oxidation, etc...) and the health consequences of both these and the refining & hydrogenation used to combat them. Not only that, there is intense pressure against trans-fats from both legislation and on a marketing basis ("trans fat free" claims are valuable selling points on packaged products)

    Even from a pure economics standpoint, the ability to replace crops of 1st gen GMO Soy (roundup ready) grown for oil and then hydrogenated with 2nd gen GMO Soy (high oleic & roundup ready) means added steps of refinement and hydrogenation can be skipped while maintaining hydrogenated oil's high smoke point, stability, shelf life and versatility in processed foods

    The result is a considerably healthier end product (no trans fats, less breakdown at high heat and a fatty acid composition more akin to "healthy" oils like Olive) that could potentially even be manufactured using expeller pressing techniques and sold as Virgin oil
    Last edited by Fury; 10-04-2011 at 05:24 PM.

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    Fury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfreaksho View Post
    Meanwhile, studies are consistently showing that organic farming is better for the farmer and the environment; it is just more expensive for the consumer. Hopefully someday the rest of America will start looking at something beyond the price tag when purchasing food.
    There are aspects of organic farming that I admire and find useful, but it's not all water, sunshine and love.

    I for one would much rather see improvements made to conventional farming practices to improve nutrition and decrease environmental impact than a wholesale adoption of organic farming with its considerably lower yields and phobia of science. The agricultural revolution of the past 100 years has produced many useful innovations, and discarding them all in an attempt to combat the worst practices of industry seems foolish.

    Fish meal, blood meal and bone meal are extremely common fertilizers on "organic" farms, and used in vast quantities. I for one would rather have pesticide-free hydroponic greens fertilized by isolated & blended mineral salts than I would cheap "organic" greens grown in a medium laced with bone & blood meal of unknown quality. How about you?

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