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  1. #21
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    None of this rings true for me. Hooray! There's an actual eating disorder I do not have!
    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    ED-NOS is also the current diagnostic category for orthorexia as well as binge eating (although this will probably change in the DSM-V to separate binge eating disorder),chewing and spitting, and other forms of disordered eating. It's pretty broad.
    Yes, this is looking more and more likely to actually happen. DSM-V can't come out soon enough, if you ask me.
    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigerLily View Post
    Yes, this is looking more and more likely to actually happen. DSM-V can't come out soon enough, if you ask me.
    I'm of two minds about the DSM. I don't like that everything has to be diagnosed and categorized--I think people's mental health is far more complex than diagnostic categories can accommodate and that labels can be stigmatizing sometimes--but I also think that having a name to put on something can be comforting for some folks and that those categories often make it easier for people to get appropriate treatment (and for mental health professionals to choose appropriate interventions).

    The history of the DSM is an interesting way to trace how we've constructed mental illness over the years.
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  4. #24
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    alright liets do this shit:

    Do they spend more than 3 hours a day thinking about healthy foods?

    Nah i don't think so, not anymore at least. I was definatly like this at one time. I was CONSTANTLY thinking about eating healthy and it was bad...since then i've loosened up alot. It helps that I don't worry about carbs or calories anymore, just focusing on whole foods.

    When they eat the way they're supposed to, do they feel in total control?

    Yes, again nowadays I do. Before I'd sit through a meal thinking about bread, rice, desert....

    Are they planning tomorrow's menu today?

    Nah I wing it, it's too much trouble

    Has the quality of their life decreased as the quality of their diet increased?

    Most important question here, IMO. Nowadays? Nope, there's a positive correlation between diet and quality of life these days. I will say that when I stray i still feel kinda guilty though

    Have they become stricter with themselves?

    Not really, but you kind of have to be when eating healthy...who wouldn't want to eat doughnuts for breakfast, Peanutbutter and banana sandwhiches for lunch and Pizza for dinner if it was healthy? We're naturally attracted to tastier foods and alot of time processed foods are unnaturally ultra tasty. After dinner I might not want an apple but there's always room for cake. This is a bad question IMO

    Does their self-esteem get a boost from eating healthy?

    No

    Do they look down on others who don't eat this way?

    No I never did, its your body and your life, do what your want...it does bother me when people are obviously trying to get healthy and are doin it wrong

    Do they skip foods they once enjoyed in order to eat the "right" foods?

    Sometimes, but too much of this induces binging in me so i've loosended up on this too. I try to stick to my old favorites that I know are healthy.

    Does their diet make it difficult for them to eat anywhere but at home, distancing them from family and friends?

    Nah I learned to adjust and simply aim for the least processed foods on the menu. I don't ask for my burger without the bun or anything akward like that.

    Do they feel guilt or self-loathing when they stray from their diet?

    A little, won't lie.

    For those of your who don't think Orthorexia is real, I disagree. I definatly had issues when I started trying to eat healthy but I think they were tied into my General Anxiety, which I belive is tied to my depression which is tied to recreational drug use, which i've stopped.

    Since i've layed off the drugs things have defintaly improved. I wouldn't have openly aswered these questions like this 6 months ago...

  5. #25
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    My turn! My turn!

    Do they spend more than 3 hours a day thinking about healthy foods?
    Well, including time spent eating and cooking, and then noticing my digestive patterns, yes. Probably about three hours. And?

    When they eat the way they're supposed to, do they feel in total control?
    In control of food and many risk factors for disease? Yes. But nobody is ever really in control, and is fooled if they think they are.

    Are they planning tomorrow's menu today?
    I plan out the week when I buy my groceries. It's called being poor. Every penny must be allocated efficiently.

    Has the quality of their life decreased as the quality of their diet increased?
    Uh, no. I can run, climb trees, and walk around with no shirt. I am only growing younger. Life is 10x better when I eat this way.

    Have they become stricter with themselves?
    That could mean absolutely anything to anyone. Not a real point for criteria.

    Does their self-esteem get a boost from eating healthy?
    Shouldn't everyone?

    Do they look down on others who don't eat this way?
    In sympathy and with love and frustration, I see my brothers and sisters die by their own hand. Down? No. Across.

    Do they skip foods they once enjoyed in order to eat the "right" foods?
    You mean I don't eat poison anymore? What a concept. Foolish criteria again.

    Does their diet make it difficult for them to eat anywhere but at home, distancing them from family and friends?
    I should hope so. Friends? What's that? Oh, that's right. Those things with two legs that come into your house to steal things and create problems. I don't keep them anymore. Too much maintenance, very dangerous creatures to have around.

    Do they feel guilt or self-loathing when they stray from their diet?
    No, there is no profit in stressing out about what has been done. Just jump back on the horse. And eat it.


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  6. #26
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    I think the answer to those questions will be different depending on what stage of adopting a new style of eating a person is in. At the beginning, a lot of time will be devoted to planning and thinking about the diet. As time goes on. less brain time should be devoted to all that. It should become a natural part of daily life.

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  7. #27
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    As someone with a family member who suffered form anorexia and bulimia for a couple years (still struggles sometimes during times of stress, but has recovered for the most part), I can tell you that there is a huge difference between trying to eat healthy and an actual eating disorder. If a way of eating is causing massive stress, creating nutritional deficiencies, and essentially ruining your life and health then it is a disorder. It's the difference between counting calories and being so obsessed with calories that you can't even nibble on something without knowing exactly how many calories it will be (and being terribly stressed by the whole activity).

    A quest for healthy eating should enhance one's life, not destroy it.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    As someone with a family member who suffered form anorexia and bulimia for a couple years (still struggles sometimes during times of stress, but has recovered for the most part), I can tell you that there is a huge difference between trying to eat healthy and an actual eating disorder. If a way of eating is causing massive stress, creating nutritional deficiencies, and essentially ruining your life and health then it is a disorder. It's the difference between counting calories and being so obsessed with calories that you can't even nibble on something without knowing exactly how many calories it will be (and being terribly stressed by the whole activity).

    A quest for healthy eating should enhance one's life, not destroy it.

    + 9999999999
    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
    If a way of eating is causing massive stress, creating nutritional deficiencies, and essentially ruining your life and health then it is a disorder. It's the difference between counting calories and being so obsessed with calories that you can't even nibble on something without knowing exactly how many calories it will be (and being terribly stressed by the whole activity).
    Exactly. It's not that "eating healthy" makes you feel good about yourself, it's that what you eat defines your worth as a person. Accidentally eat an "impure" (the "purity" of foods is a common concern in orthorexia) cookie? You're a worthless pile of shit and don't deserve to continue to breathe. Don't have access to "safe" foods? Panic attack. Yeah, I've got some experience with this.

    As for the DSM, the last time I saw an update, they were increasing the minimum weight for anorexia/bulimia nervosa as well as ditching the amenorrhea thing (both out of concern for women and to help suffering men get treatment easier), and adding COE/BED as disorders separate from the EDNOS umbrella.

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